Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Dismissed. —Peter Fagan was brought up on remand at the Court on Saturday, on a charge of lunacy from drink, and was dismissed.

Testing the Liquor. —We understand that the various hotels in town were visited on Saturday by an officer of the Government to obtain samples of whisky, for the purpose of being tested by the Government Analyst. Drunk and Disorderly. —A man was yesterday remanded till the usual Court sitting to-day on charges of being drunk, using obscene language in the streets, and otherwise misconducting himself. He had been chasing females in the street on Saturday night. “Star Combination.” A “star” combination company gave an entertainment in the Town Hall on Saturday evening to thirty people. The show had not been advertised, and nobody knew anything about it—hence the miserable account of empty benches.

The Cattle Yards Tenders. —The following tenders have been accepted by the County Council: —Fencing—A. R. Leask, £ls Bs. ; trimming fences —R. Rolston, £1 9s. Fencing Rakaia Gorge Bridge Road—a tender for this work has also been accepted—namely, that of Y. Soland, at £72 10s.

The Mails.— Mails for _ tha United Kingdom, &c., via Brindisi (for specially addressed correspondence only) will close on Wednesday, at 10.15 a.m., for despatch per express train, to connect with the Ro :orua at the Bluff. Money orders should be taken out the previous day. The Brindisi late of postage for the United Kingdom is 8d per half ounce. The Borough Election.— On the 9th September, the election of three persons will take place to fill the vacancies caused by the retirement by rotation of Messrs. St. Hill, Roberts, and Orr. These three gentlemen are eligible for re-election. Nominations will be received by the Town Clerk, who is returning officer, up till noon of Tuesday, the 31st inst. The Telegraph.— The telegraph lines destroyed during the recent gale have not yet been all replaced, and telegraphic communication between Christchurch and the north is still interrupted. It is expected that the gap will be stopped today, but meanwhile we must depend on the arrival of steamers from Wellington for such cablegrams as we are able to supply. Those we give to-day are the ones published in Friday’s Wellington Post.

“Cranmer and his Times.”— The above is the title of a lecture to be delivered in the Town Hall, next Mondayevening, by the Rev. Mr. McKee, Presbyterian minister, who is to preach in the Presbyterian Church next Sabbath, anniversary sermons, the occasion being the induction of the pastor of the Ashburton church. Mr. McKee will also preach at Wakanui. The proceeds of Monday’s lecture will be devoted to the repair of the church building. An Ungrateful Old Man. —A decripit old man, named Sullivan, was brought before his Worship on Saturday charged with being drunk and disorderly and usir.g abusive language to the arresting constable. Sergeant Felton stated that Sullivan had been brought up last November on a charge of vagrancy, but in consequence of being a paralytic, he had been accommodated with quarters at the Old Men’s home. Mr. Guinness inflicted a fine of 20s. on the culprit, in default to be imprisoned for forty-eight hours.

Entertainment. —Last night the panorama of New Zealand, which for some time past has been advertised in our columns, was exhibited at the Town Hall to a rather thin audience. The various views were described by Mr. Bevan, and the proceedings were enlivened hy the rendering of several ducts and trios, the parts taken by Mr. Bevan and two of his children, a son and a daughter. The views were good, the light giving them great brilliancy, and as a wind up some comic sketches were introduced. The panorama will be repeated at Rakaia to-night.

Kyle Concert. —Notwithstanding the unfavorable weather, the Kyle schoolroom was well filled on Friday evening, and everything passed off in a most sucessful manner. Mr. J. Lambie occupied the chair, and expatiated at some length on the importance of public libraries. He was of opinion that “ Library on the Brain ” was not a dangerous form of insanity. The several items on the programme were most successfully rendered, the glees and choruses going with great precision and effect. Mr. George Johns was very successful as a reciter, and Mr. G. Parker, who sustained the comic portion of the entertainment, was repeatedly encored. The real gem of the evening, however, was Mrs. Loudon’s song, “ ’Tis but a little faded flower,” which received a well merited encore. The instrumental pieces rendered by Miss Rogers and Miss Lambie were likewise very well received. Mr. Thompson sang “ Sad at heart,” and in response to an encore gave that musical gem “ The Arab’s farewell to his steed.” Mr. Blackburn’s singing was well appreciated. In the absence of Mr. Winter Mr. Hall gave a reading, Tennyson’s “ Northern Farmer,” new style. The style in which Mr. Hall delivered the reading fairly took the audience by storm, and he was vocferously encored, and responded with the “ Northern Farmer,” old style. The National Anthem, and a vote of thanks to the Chairman brought the concert to a close. Dancing was then kept up with great spirit till an early hour.

Borough Council. —A meeting of the Ashburton Borough Council was held last night. The business was not very important, and we hold over our report to make room for more readable matter. A Conundrum. —A humorous correspondent draws bur attention to a mixture that occurred in the notice, in our last issue, of Messrs Davies and Winter’:-; sale to-day at Eakaia, and asks for a key to the “conundrum.” The key is a very simple one—a careless compositor allowed a line to get astray from the Corn Exchange report, and it found a lodgment in the sale notice referred to. He regrets the mistake—much.

The Rivers. lias been blowing for the last few days has had the effects of causing a considerable fresh in the Ashburton river. The Mount Somers coach found the South branch high enough to be unpleasant and the driver was discreet enough to take Digby’s bridge in preference to crossing the usual ford, down which a considerable body of wafer was flowing, “ It’s an ill vind that blows nobody good,” and we may perhaps thank our late boisterous weather for assisting to bring on the much-needed water supply for the township, as not only will Uiere be a larger quantity of water coming down the race, but the fluid will bo of a denser nature than usual seeing that a considerable amount of sediment Is coming down the North branch in freshets. The Kaiapoi Woollen Factory.— Yesterday Mr. Wood, the manager of the Kaiajro: Woollen Factory, visited Ashburton on his journey south, with a view to Lying the proposal to form a limited liability company to work the factory more extensively and more profitably, before the merchants and business men of the town. The proposed capital of the company is LIOO,OOO in 4000 shares of L 25 each. 825 of these shares, fully paid up, go to the present shareholders, in exchange for the shares now held in the concern by them, and of the remainder only 1,600 are proposed to be placed in the market at present. Nearly one-half of the latter have aleady been applied for in and around Christchurch, and we learn that Mr. Wood’s visit to Ashburton has not been an unsuccessful one.. The promoters of the company do not desire to see the shares taken in large numbers in single lines by individuals, but would prefer to see a numerous proprietory of small holders, thereby spreading a personal interest in this native industry amongst the colonists. Intending shareholders and others are referred to an advertisement elsewhere. Ashburton Racing Club. — A meeting cf those interested in sporting matters was held at Quill’s Hotel on Saturday evening. There was a good attendance, Mr. John Carter being appointed chairman. The Secretary, Mr. Wilkie, stated that the meeting had been called to test the feeling of the public on the question of holding the usual spring meeting. The committee had not felt themselves justified in undertaking the responsibility of publishing a programme owing to the probability of not being backed up by public subscriptions, and he would therefor e ask that the meeting would take some steps in the matter. During the first three years the Committee had expended a large portion of their funds in permanent improvements on the course, and had consequently to give smaller prizes to be run for. As the cost of the course would not be an element in the present j-ear’s racing, it was therefore evident that a smaller sum would be needed to give for added money, and as they had had some eighty subscribing members last year, subscriptions and the amount realisable from the outside public and the sale of privileges should make up a sufficient sura to carry out their usual programme. Mr. T. Quill proposed, and Mr. Hay Smith seconded—‘ ‘ That the usual spring meeting be hold in November.” The motion was carried. It was further resolved that a meeting be held on Friday, September 3rd, at 1 p.m., at Quill’s Hotel, when the Committee would have a programme to submit to the public for approval ; and that notices be sent to all members, requesting their attendance. It was decided to call for tenders for leasing the course for a crop of turnips and a grain crop, tenders to he sent in by the 3rd September. The meeting then adjourned.

Over 12,000 of the unemployed are applying for Government work in Victoria.

A Good Sion. —There has been a great falling off in the number of applications for relief at the Christchurch Soup Kitchen during thii week. A Whirlwind. — At Westport on Friday last, a whirlwind, travelling E.N.E., passed over the town, unroofing several houses, and tearing trees up by the roots.

Sunday closing in Melbourne has proved a failure, as the hotel-keepers, by the connivance of the police, habitually evade the law.

Fish. —Herrings are stated to be very plentiful on the East Coast just now. Last week a couple of fishing boats with one net caught over 1,500 fish in one haul in Napier harbor. Cray-fish, on the other hand, are remarkably scarce. Quick Sailing. —The steamer Potosi, recently made the passage from Plymouth to Adelaide in thirty-six days and one hour, including all stoppages. This is the shortest passage from England to Adelaide on record.

Cheap.—A horse, such as Mark Twain described as a crate covered with hide, was sold from the Pound at Bulls for one shilling. It is said to have been purchased by a butcher, who, however, reassured his sausage-consuming customers by declaring that he only wanted the hide. An Offensive Cemetery. — So offensive have the odours become that arise from the Wellington cemetery and the drainage from it that flows into a neighboring creek, that steps are being taken by the City Council to have the burying ground closed in the interests of public health. Seamen’s Union.— Mr. George Songster, a delegate from the Yictorian Seamen’s Union, is at present in New Zealand, endeavoring to establish branches of his society in this colony. He has already planted a branch at Port Chalmers, and it numbers 200 members already. Te Whxti’s Great Anniversary.— The 17th September is the 12th anniversary of the ra o te taJcahanga, the day on which Te Whiti initiated his scheme for thebenefit of the Maori race. Those who are fond of anticipating something sensational from the “Prophet” on important anniversaries expect a coup d’ 6tat of an unusual character from him on that date. Saddling the Wrong Horse. —A most ludicrous incident occurred in connection with a recent inquest at Hokitika. The Coroner by mistake made out a warrant for the burial of the hotelkeeper at whose house the inquest was held, instead of the deceased. Strange to say Boniface did not appreciate the unsought attention, and in defiance of the Coroner’s warrant still remains above ground.

Gathering Up a Fragment. —Some considerable time ago a Wellington constable named McWilliams, in trying to arrest two “blue jackets” belonging to H.M. S. Sappho, was flung down stairs and injured for life. The officers of H. M. S. Raleigh, now in port at Wellington, interested themselves on behalf of McWilliams, and got him placed on the ship’s roll. He left in the Raleigh for England last week.

Recent Earthquakes. The earthquakes on the Ist and sth inst., which it will be remembered brought the members of the House up all standing in the thick of business and gave some of them an E3ea that the end of all tilings had come, [were felt at a distance of 150 miles off lland, where a marine disturbance was exjperienced, the shocks being felt most distinctly on board the Rodell Bay, in spite ph a heavy sea. I The Census Act.— The following is [the text of the Census Act Amendment [Bill introduced by the Government; —The [general account or census provided by [The Census Act, 1877, to be taken in the [year one thousand eight hundered and [eighty-one, in such month and, on such [day, not being later than the first day of [April in such year, as the Governor shall [appoint, shall be taken on the third day [of April in the said year. All the proIvisions of The Census Act, 1877, shall apply and extend to the account or census to be then takens

Submarine Volcano. —The people of Napier have been somewhat excited of late by a rumor having gained currency that a volcano under the sea has been discovered at a place called Blackhead, which is situated nearly 100 miles from that town. The phenomenon is on the coast near Porangahau, and the water is constantly being thrown at a great height. The earthquakes.that have been experienced of late may no doubt be attributed to this volcano. Should it be a very active one, earthquakes may occur more frequently in the future than they have done before.

A Would-be Dairyman. —The Taranaki Herald, of the 11th inst., has the following: “There are many ways of appealing for charity, but we imagine the one adopted yesterday by an able-bodied man was quite new and original. The person referred to, it seems, knocked at the door of a house occupied by a gentleman in good circumstances in New Plymouth, and requested to speak to the ‘ good lady’ of the house. When Mrs. appeared, the man produced a paper, and solicited a subscription to go towards the purchase of a cow, by way of encouraging him in his honest endeavours to establish a dairy. He stated that he was a hard-working man, and had succeeded in buying a cow out of his own earnings, and what he now wanted was sufficient funds to enable him to buy another cow in order to set up a dairy. Mrs. was greatly puzzled at the manner in which the appeal for charity was made, and, after serious reflection declined to become a subscriber.”

A Boil Over. —The following curious story is told by the Parliamentary correspondent of the Wanganui Herald: — “I have just heard of one of the most extraordinary affairs that has, perhaps, ever occurred in the history of officialdom, and I can vouch for every word I am going to relate. An officer of the Government, who is described as a Commissioner, addressed a few days since a telegram to Sir George Grey, in Maori, asking Sir George to take up his case against the Government, and promising some startling disclosures. Sir George handed the telegram to an interpreter, who translated it as if it had been written by a native, who signed himself an Assessor. Thinking it referred to one of the Native Assessors who had been dismissed, Sir George showed the telegram to Mr. Bryce, desiring to know the cause of the dismissal. The Native Minister replied that it was only one case out of twentyseven Assessors who had been relieved of office in order to promote retrenchment. Sir George Grey then asked the Minister if he would be good enough to state the reason on the telegram formally, so that he could reply. Mr. Bryce took away the telegram, and handed it to an interpreter, who brought it back with the startling information that it was from a Commissioner, not Assessor, and that the said Commissioner was a well-known Government officer. The Minister duly informed Sir George Grey of the discovery, whereupon Sir George observed that, considering the way the Minister had got the information, he should not take any notice of it ; bub the Minister sharply replied that, since it came before him, he woidd notice it. And so the matter stands. It is evident the officer telegraphed in Maori because of some lurking fear that the Telegraph Office could not tetain so great a secret as a high official intriguing against his Ministerial heads. It will be interesting to know the future career of this Commissioner.”

Potato Export. —There is an opening for our produce in J lhdia. The Madras Times of the 2nd May has an advertisement respecting the anticipated arrival of a trial shipment by the mail steamer of Australian potatoes for table and seed purposes. The potatoes were packed in 4cwt. boxes. Should the shipment prove a success, there will doubtless be a considerable demand for potatoes of Australian production, and there is no reason why those grown in New Zealand should not find as good a market. City of Glasgow Bank. —lt appears that among the assets of the City of Glasgow Bank was a gold reef in the Indian mines, to which public attention has lately been directed, and it now appears that this “claim” has proved very rich ; indeed, it is rumored that its product may possibly be of sufficient value to return a moiety of the Bank’s debts, the payment of which utterly ruined so many well-to-do shareholders. But those, and much the larger number, who have failed or compounded with the liquidators will have no share in this -windfall, which will go the very small, number who have been rich enough to., weather the storm, and retain their position on the roll.

Mr. Gladstone’s Correspondence The following letter recently appeared in the London Daily News: —“ Sir,—l am reluctant again to trespass on your columns for the purpose of asking the indulgence of my correspondence, but for some weeks past the daily arrivals at my door by post have exceeded 100, and I must trust to the kindness of very many, whose communications might well claim a distinct notice, to believe that they receive from me the best attention which circumstances permit me to give.—l have the honor to be, Sir, your obedient servant, W. E. Gladstone.”

The Cape Colony.—Now that the troubles with the Zulus and the Boers are at an end, there is no doubt (says the Home News) that the colonisation of South Africa will rapidly progress, especially as great inducements are held out by the Cape Government to surplus humanity to go to those parts. Any man with a few pounds can become a farmer there. This is what the Cape Government offers to respectable agriculturalists, married or single, not over 45 years old, desirous of emigrating to Cape Colony: —A free passage for the settlor and family, and land in the finest agricultural and grazing district of the Cape at 10s. per acre ; the payment to be made in ten years, at Is. the acre per year. In some districts, where the poor rates are heavy, the means of relieving the burden suggests itself to the advantage of all-comers. Perhaps the laborers will, however, want a sprinkling of diamonds in the soil guaranteed.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18800824.2.6

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 143, 24 August 1880

Word Count
3,303

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 143, 24 August 1880

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working