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The Ashburton Guardian, COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & SPORTING RECORDER. THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 1880.

The withdrawal of capitation from the Volunteers will doubtless cripple that patriotic body of men for a time, and have the effect, perhaps, of damping the ardour, to some extent, of not a few of the most enthusiastic members. There are those who look upon dur isolation in New Zealand frem the rest of the world as a commercial disadvantage, but who will, doubtless, set down as a per contra the immunity, real or fancied, which the same isolation gives us from the attacks of foes. They are welcome to their opinion, but we hope this faith in our immunity is not general, for it is quite possible we may find ourselves rudely convinced that this faith is not well founded. We are no more satisfied that a foe of England would think this small part of England’s empire too far away and too insignificant to look up, then we are satisfied that our isolation is a complete barrier to our entrance into the world’s market as merchants of produce. At any rate, it is quite within the bounds of possibility that at some future period of the colony’s history all our military and defensive ability may be wanted, and, though we do not counsel the maintenance of a standing army, nor urge New Zealand to stand armed to the teeth, and look out from our southern corner like a snarling bull terrier, ever ready to bite, still it is as well that our youth should learn the use of arms and some notion of military work. This can only be acquired at some cost to the colony, and to do it efficiently that cost is no small item. The full cost we cannot at present afford, and realising our povertystricken state, Parliament has wiped out the capitation grant. But there ought to be exceptions to the action of this wholesale wiping out. There are corps that have struggled into existence honestly and battled manfully against many difficulties, and the officers of these, trusting to Government-given aid, have become personally responsible for necessary liabilities incurred for their corps’ benefit. Some consideration ought to be had, and some allowance made for such corps. For the credit of the colony we hope that these ex; penses will not fall upon the purses of the officers, but that the liabilities incurred will be taken oyer by the Government. Then, there are corps, only formed a short time ago, comparatively speaking, but on whom money has been spent by the Government, and also to no small extent by the members themselves. A very small expenditure would suffice to enable these corps to meet their first and heaviest expenditure, and then be in a fair way to help themselves. The Government aid given to volunteers does not represent all the money that the movement costs, and we know that not a man in any corps holds his position without being in a greater or less degree out of pocket. In fact, volunteering is rather an expensive pastime, if it be looked upon as such; and looked upon as a duty, it takes the form, to most citizen soldiers, of a tax. Last November, at the annnal distribution of prizes to the Cheshire Rifle Volunteers, Lieut.-Colonel King, who is one of the oldest officers in the English volunteer service, said that, some time back, in obedience to instructions from the War office, he had collected statistics, showing the actual expenditure of his battalion for the year, and he was surprised at the result. The average excess of annua! expenditure of his battalion and staff over receipts amounted to 24. This was for seven companies, the eighth not having at that date reported ; but he was satisfied the return of the eighth company would bring the total up to ;£Boo. He assumed that the result would be found to represent the average in other corps over the kingdom, and at that rate was annually paid by the volunteers and their friends to keep up the force. We feel morally certain that a sum larger in proportion to the number of volunteers is annually paid by the officers and men and friends of the movement in New Zealand. It must be so, for the Government aid alone could never support the corps as they are now situated, and as a man’s willingness to put his hand in his pocket to pay is a sign that he believes in what be is paying for, we conclude that the volunteers are in earnest, and a sum sufficient to help the struggling ones to live as corps till better times dawn ought certainly to be voted.

We would once more draw the attention of our readers to the necessity of placing themselves, if they have not already done so, upon the electoral roll of the district. A farmer on the plains a few days ago pointed out to us that a large number of his neighbors, being leaseholders, had not registered, believing that, having been on the old roll, they would be placed on the new one as a matter of course. We would remind those gentlemen that there is no “of course” about it, but that if they do not apply for registration they will not be registered. The leasehold qualification is no longer recognised, and the only claims the registrar will listen to are those of freehold property and residence in the district. The mistake made by many residents in believing that they are “ electors” because they possessed votes under the old' system, and have neglected to register under the new law, has considerably reduced the roll of the district. We are surprised to notice how few, too, of those whom the new residential qualification has entitled to a vote have seen fit as yet to take advantage of the right conferred upon them.

Hinds School. —Tenders are invited in another column for the erection of a school at the Hinds. District Court. —The usual sitting of the District Court takes place on Monday next. Educational. — Miss Barratt announces her intention of opening a seminary for young ladies. The Ashburton Water-Works Bill.— This Bill was read a second time in the Legislative Council on Tuesday evening. New Firm. —The shop in Tancrcd Street lately occupied by Mr. J. Fowler, has been taken by Messrs. E. Hutton and Co., where they are prepared to dispose of their stock at “ astounding bargains."

The San Francisco Mail. —Mails for tile United Kingdom, Ac., via San Francisco, will close at Ashburton on Saturday morning at 9 o’clock. Money orders to go by this opportunity should be taken out on or before Friday.

Cart Accident. —Last night a carter, driving a three-horse dray from Cox street to the Great South Road, across the tussocks between Mr. Buchanan’s house and that of Rev. Mr. Westbrooke, mot with a mishap just as he reached the Great South Road. His shafts broke when the dray took the dip of the ditch, and for a short time the dray, laden with a plough and chaff formed a sort of blockade, but was soon drawn to a side. There was no damage done beyond the breaking of the shafts, and the horses were uninjured.

Tinkettlino a Bobby. Constable Rouse, with his newly made bride, having arrived at Rakaia by the last train from Christchurch, on Tuesday, the larrikins of the place, about twenty in number, assembled about half-past ten oclock in front of his house in Mackie Street, and serenaded the happy pair with the music usually obtained by beating empty tins, accompanying the music with songs and choruses. Failing to induce the constable to make his appearance the band adjourned thinking that he might not be at home. But they returned after some little time and re-com-monced their serenading. Ultimately the happy man came out and gave the musicians a sovereign to drink the health of himself and wife, when the band disappeared to the nearest hotel singing, “For he’s a jolly good fellow.”

The Fire Brigade. —Last night the members of the Fire Brigade to the number of fourteen turned out to practice. The deep well opposite Saundors’ Buildings was tried, and was found to contain over seven feet of water. Four lengths of suction hose -were attached to the engine and dropped into the well. Pumping commenced, and, working with a half-inch nozzle, it was found that an abundant supply was available. A threequarter inch nozzle was then screwed on, and the branchman was able, even with the greater volume of water thrown, to send a jet over the roof of the Commercial Hotel, and the office of this paper. This well had been set down as almost useless, hut it is now found to be a good serviceable source of supply, thanks, no doubt, to the Borough’s water supply scheme through the Domain, the perlocation from which is evidently helping the wells immediately below it. The members of the Brigade look remarkably well in their new uniform, but they would he all the better of a few more men on the pump handles, as the engine is very inefficiently worked with fewer than twenty.

Masonic. —An emergency meeting of the St. John’s Lodge was held in the Masonic Hall on Tuesday evening, which was largely attended. Although called under the dispensation of a particular lodge, this meeting was to all intents and purposes a general gathering of the masons of Ashburton, for the purpose of imparting and receiving instruction in the symbolic work of a masonic lodge. A very instructive lecture in the E.A. degree was given by P.M. Bro. Stevenson, also one on the principles of architecture as shown in King Solomon’s Temple, by Bro. Rev. Hands. For the purpose of illustration, Bro. Hands had a model of the Tabernacle as built by the children of Israel, also drawings of the Temple of Jerusalem. Bro. Guinness instructed the brethren in the secret work of the craft, which as an old and experienced craftsman, he was in a particularly good position to impart As the inaugural meeting of- its kind, this may be considered a success, and doubtless the masons in the district will not be slow to avail themselves of the opportunity afforded for working themselves up in the symbolic work of the craft.’ The next meeting is to be called by the Somerset Lodge, and will be held in about a month.

Ashburton School Committee. —The usual monthly meeting of the local School Committee was held on Tuesday, and was an unusually short one. There were present Dr. Stewart (Chairman), Messrs. Bean, Boyle, Jacobsen, Orr, and St. Hill. Master .Tunes, pupil teacher, wrote, requesting to be relieved from his duties, in consequence of his parents removing to Invercargill. Mr. Jacobsen moved, and Mr. Orr seconded, “ That, under the circumstances, the Board of Education be recommended to relieve Innes from his duties.” Considerable discussion ensued on the question, and members of the committee expressed their opinion that these kind of applications were becoming unpleasantly frequent. The motion was carried, but it was understood the recommendation was only made in consequence of the exceptional circumstances of the case. Several letters pertaining to the routine of the school were read from the Board of Education. The masters report showed that there were on the| roll at present-boys, 225 ; girls, 224 ; total, 449, To-day’s attendance —boys, 184 ; girls, 178 ; total, 362. Reference was made in the report to the contemplated removal of pupil teacher Innes, the master expressing his opinion that the vacancy could be filled without muck difficulty ; to the disadvantage which Mr. Mayo labored under through insufficient desk accommodation ; to the state of the small gate in front of the school ; and to the very satisfactory state of cleanliness in which the school was kept. It was explained by the Chairman that the desks had been ordered, and that instructions had been given to have the dilapidated gate repaired. There being no other business the proceedings terminated.

The Bariimd. —An information has been laid against Beattie, proprietor of the Palace hotel, in Christchurch, for keeping a barmaid at work after hours.

A Wealthy Swindler. —A man named Smith has been arrested at Auckland for issuing valueless cheques. He is of good English connection, a remittance man, and heir to L 20,000.

A Coaling Station. —The German Consul at Auckland intends to transmit a report to the German Admiralty as to the facilities of Auckland as a coaling station, with a view to causing them to direct vessels to that port for the purpose of obtaining supplies, instead of Australia.

Railway Accident.— At Papakura, a station in the Auckland Province, a man named Livingston, rushing to catch a departing train, slipped, fell, and was run over, without anyone knowing., lie was not killed, however, and when he returned to consciousness his cries attracted the stationmastor’s attention. Both of the injured man’s legs had to be cut off.

Business and Pleasure.— The readiness with which our senators welcome any opportunity of escaping from the dreary and monotonous duties pertaining to their position was illustrated last Friday when, in concluding an answer to a question put by Colonel Brett, re the ship Annabella. at Lyttelton, the Attorney General added “ Speaking of ships, I wish to say that members of both Houses will be taken to her Majesty’s ships Raleigh and Damn to-morrow afternoon, at 2.30, by the Stella.” This rapid and agreeable change of the conversation (says the Post) from such a painful subject of discussion as the propriety of risking sailors’ lives in alleged unseaworthy vessels was hailed with loud applause by the Council, who continued in a pleasant mood until they came to discuss the reductions made by the Lower House in the salaries of officers of the Legislative Council, whereat they expressed some dissatisfaction.

The Waimate Plains. — A telegram from Pungarehu states that four more natives were arrested on Tuesday morning, which makes tan more to be sent to New Plymouth. The Taranaki Herald states that the Surveyor-General has telegraphed to the Chief Surveyor, requesting him to meet him on the Waimate Plains, so that they may go over the land together, to make arrangements for surveying it.

Wild Deer. —The Wuirarapa Daily of a recent date has the following “ The deer that were turned out in tho Wairarapa district a few years ago have increased and multiplied at a marvellous rate. A gentleman who was passing through Wainuioru the other day informed the Times that he passed by droves of deer, amongst them stags with enormous antlers. The animals are said to abound from Wainuioru right across country to the sea at Rutherford. In another year or so venison should be a marketable article of diet.”

No Pay, No Teaching. —At a recent meeting of the Board of Governors of the Wellington College it was remarked that L 205 2s, Gd. was due to the treasurer on account of fees. Mr. Levin, M.H.R., said that in King’s College, London, it was customary when he was a boy for each student to present a ticket of admission at the commencement of the term. This ticket was virtually an acknowledgment of the receipt of the required fee, and without it no boy could be admitted. Ho suggested that in future no student should bo admitted who failed to produce his receipt, and tho proposition appeared to meet with favor.

A Knowing Horse. —A story is told (says the English correspondent of the Melbourne Weekly Times) that many years ago the famous trainer of racehorses, the recently deceasedTbomas Dawson, paid a visit to Swinton Park, thehome of his employer, Admiral Harcourt. The Admiral invited Dawson to accompany him to the adjoining paddocks in order to inspect the brood mares and foals. “ I will show you an old favorite of yours,” said the owner of Swinton Park, as they approached a cluster of brood mares ; “If Ellderdale is among them,” observed Dawson, “ depend upon it that she has not forgotten her old grudge against me, and {that she will run me out of the paddock,” The mare in question lifted up her head as the voice of her former trainer reached her ears, and after gazing upon him for a minute, she set off to pursue him, with ears laid back, and flashing eye and snorting nostril.

LI,OOO in Notes Burnt.— A few days since our Wellington telegrams contained the information that a fire had taken place on the station of Mr. H. Mace, completely destroying the whole of the buildings thereon. From files now to hand we learn that the most unfortunate part of the affair is the fact that a large sum of money—Ll,ooo in notes —was burnt in the fire. This money had been received in two large bundles of notes, in payment of a quantity of cattle which had been sold. From some motive or other these notes had not been banked, but was secreted by Mr. Simpson, one of the proprietors, in a portion of the roof, informing no one—not even his wife—where they were placed. On the morning following the fire, a quantity of calcined paper was found. This parcel was carefully taken up, put into a handkerchief, and sent to tho Bank of New Zealand at Wellington, where steps will probably be taken to ascertain by scientific aid if the bundle referred to actually consists of the notes left in the house.

“ Our Perambulator,” the funnyman of the Christchurch Echo, treats his readers to the following account of a Road Board Clerk's various positions : “ I happened to be down at the Wakaia lately. It is a pretty place, and the scenery most picturesque. I had occasion to visit the Road Board office, and I can assure your readers that I was in perfect dread of the gentleman I interviewed, as he appeared to me more like the Lord Mayor of London than a small pettifogging clerk. lam credibly informed that ho has a good salary, viz., L2OO per annum from the Road Board and LSO per annum from the Government, but ho has a soul above salaries, and he has therefore engaged himself to an Insurance Company, as their agent, for which he receives a very large remuneration. Our friend is not, however, content with that. He serves his own summonses from the Court, and gets his own servant to clean out the offices, although he has authority to employ labor for the purpose. The Hon. John Hall should not lose sight of such a valuable acquisition to the public service.”

A Wellington Brothel Burst.— A destructive fire broke out in a house of ill-fame in Wellington, occupied by Mrs. Baker, at 6.30 p.m. on Tuesday. When the fire was first discovered the front part of the building, which contained 12 rooms, was one mass of llamos, spending rapidly. The occupants soon made their escape, but were unable to saa c anything. The Fire Brigades worked well, but the flames having a firm hold, it was impossible to do anything but endeavor to prevent the spread of the fire. The strong wind, however, carried the fire to a fourroomed cottage occupied by the cook to Mrs. Baker, which was soon burned. The next buildings to catch were the cottage owned by Mr. Webb, and a workshop containing a quantity of tools owned by Mr. F. Pagon. The former was gutted, but the latter was completely destroyed. It was thought that a large number of houses would be destroyed, but the stroi g pressure of water from several streets got the flames under. Several narrow escapes occurred from burning flakes. The fire is supposed to have been caused through the bursting of the kerosene lamp. Mrs. Baker was insured for LIOSO. Hone of the other buildings were insured. A dotatchment of sailors from H.M.S. Raleigh did good service in saving property.

“Up in A Balloon. M. Javis, a French balloonist, is about to make an attempt to cross the English Channel in a balloon —of course, weather permitting. No date has been fixed for the ascent ; but, although M. Javis finds his own balloon and takes all the risk, the authorities have agreed to send the aeronaut the meteorological observations which will enable him to select the most suitable time for his voyage. A steamer will accompany the balloon as far as possible, and the ascent will probably be made at Boulogne some time this month.

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The Ashburton Guardian, COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & SPORTING RECORDER. THURSDAY, AUGUST 12, 1880. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 138, 12 August 1880

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