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ASHBURTON HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY.

The usual monthly meeting was held on Tuesday evening. There was a fair attendance, and Mr. Smith was voted to the chair. He introduced Mr. G. Broomfield, who at the previous meeting had promised to read a paper on ‘‘ Cucumbers, their growth and cultivation.” Mr. Broomfield, however, explained that, owing to a misunderstanding with reference to the night of meeting, he had not prepared a paper ; but, rather than disappoint those who had come together to gain some information, he would give some of his own

expedience on the subject, thinking the meeting would agree with him when he said that .practical experience would be of more use than the mere propounding of theories. At his request, Mr. Poyntz here read some extracts from “The Cottage Gardiner’s Dictionary,” descriptive'jof the different varieties of cucumbers and the modes of raising them. Mr. Broomfield then gave some valuable information relative to the raising of cucumbers by means of a properly constructed frame, and calling attention to the necessity of sheltering the young plants from the winds so prevalent here, as, in his opinion, they did more harm even than frost. The seeds should first be sown in pots . half filled with mould, and having a sheet of glass on the top, when they might be expected to come up in three or four days. After the appearance of tiro second leaves they should be transplanted direct to the hot-bed. It was a great mistake to. allow the plants to show fruit too soon. It would be much bettor to cut the fruit buds off, and further, if the plants are not allowed to carry too much fruit, they would keep in growth from six to nine months, bearing all the time. To those who had any intention of growing cucumbers, he would recommend as the most suitable for this country and climate “ Cox’s Volunteer. ” There were many others, such as “Duke of Edinburgh,” “Master’s Prolific,” “Telegraph,” &c., but to his mind the first named was the best. Referring to outdoor cucumbers Mr. Broomfield thought those present were well acquainted with the usual modes of propagation, and it would be unnecessary for him to go into the subject further. A number of questions were then put to the speaker, after which, on the motion of Mr. Jacobson,’ seconded by Mr. Poyntz, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mr. Broomfield for the very interesting information he had placed before them. It was stated that a paper for the next meetJJ ing had been promised by Mr. Sealy, the' subject to be announced in due course. The meeting then adjourned.

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ASHBURTON HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 135, 5 August 1880

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