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County Council. —The ordinary monthly meeting of the Ashburton Council will be held to-morrow. In Bankruptcy. — A meeting of creditors in the bankrupt estate of H. J. Edwards is called for to-day, at the offices of Messrs. Orr and Co.

The Rangitata Ferry. —Applications for the post of ferryman at the Lower Rangitata, for one year, are invited in the present issue.

Methven Pound. —Applications are invited by the Mount Hutt Road Board from persons willing to undertake the duties of pound-keeper at the Methven Pound.

Police Changes. —We learn that, following out the reduction policy, Constable Farmer leaves the police force, Trooper Gaffney removes, to Kaiapoi, while Constable Waring undertakes mounted duty. The district will thus be reduced by two men—one in each department. That Cab. —C. Ryle writes to deny J. W. M'Rae’s statement; to denyever having been accused of brothel keeping ; to accuse M‘R-xc of being spiteful ; and to say further that, after hiring the cab to John Newman, his own connection with or control over it ceased for the time. Acts of Parliament. —The Government Printer informs us by circular, that, with a view to suit the convenience of the public desirous of procuring copies of the Acts of Parliament as passed, without waiting for the completion of the volume, on payment of a subscription of 255. they will be posted by every mail as printed. Erratum.— “ Yorkshirebite,” in criticising Mr. Silcock’s paper, refers to the quantity of grain taken off the farm. The error was not Mr. Silcock’s, but was a misprint. The items should have been “ 200 acres wheat, at 15 bushels, per acre, 3000 bushels at 35., L 450 ; 50 acres barley, at 25 bushels per acre, 1250 bushels, at 2s. Cd., L 156 ss. ” Farmers’ Corn Exchanges. —We have received a reprint in pamphlet form of a paper on methods of utilising Farmers’ Corn Exchanges, read on the 15th May last by Mr. William Bateman, at the Canterbury Corn Exchange. The pamphlet, which has been printed at the Waimate Times office, is dedicated to Mr. Thomas Bruce, of .Christchurch.

The Pruning Knife. —The Board of Education gives notice to School Committees, teachers and others, that Government having intimated that the appropriations for educational purposes, under Section 8 of the Education Act, 1877, have been reduced, a corresponding reduction will be made in salaries and allowances in every department of the Board’s service. The reduction tabes effect from the first inst. Unclaimed Letters. —We are indebted to the Postmaster for the following list of letters from places beyond the colony, received at the Ashburton Postoffice during the month of June, and remaining unclaimed on Ist August, 1880 ; —Benham, W.; Brosnahan, James ; Buckley, Joseph; Daniel, Patrick Hayes; Devine, W.; Droney, M.; Hewitt, John A.; Kelly, Terence ; O’Connell, John ; Riky, B. P.; Sturgeon, Joseph; Tumbelty, M. E.; Williams, Edward.

Whales. —The New Zealand Herald says : —“ On the last trip of the schooner Medora from Whangaroa, the captain sighted no fewer than eight whales off that port. Some of them swam alongside the vessel, and kept it company, coming so close that they could have been struck with an oar. Whales have been very numerous on the coast this season, and stray ones have found their way into this harbor, and into the Firth of the Thames. The American whalers might do worse than cruise off the New Zealand coast, as our own people do not seem to have sufficient energy left to “ strike oil.”

The Maori Prisoners. —The number of Maori prisoners now in custody over the recent fencing disturbances amounts to fifty,—twelve more having been brought to New Plymouth from the Camp on Saturday.

Death in the Street. The dead body of a woman has been found in the street at Otahuhu, near Auckland. Her name was Rose Ann Stone, and she was forty-six years of age. She had been in delicate health for some time, and was seen intoxicated on Saturday evening.

An Old Settler.— Mr. John Cowell died at Auckland on Saturday, aged 60. He was one of the oldest settlors in New Zealand. He accompanied Mr. Houghton on his southern expedition, and Potatau on his expedition to Taranaki. He was obliged to leave Kawhai with other Europeans during the first Taranaki war.

Frightened to Death. —A lad in Wellington named Smith was concerned recently in an affair that ended in the police laying an information against four or five lads for using profane and obscene language on the street. Smith was so much afraid of being mixed up in the afiair that it brought on a severe attack of palnitation of the heart, from which he died. New Zealand Ploughs at Melbourne. —Messrs. Reid and Gray, of Dunedin, intend to exhibit in Melbourne at the coming Exhibition a beautifully made and finished double-furrow plough and a complete set of four-leaf harrows. Every part of the ironwork of the plough is carefully and highly polished, and the swingletrees and woodwork of botli plough and harrows are as carefully dressed and finished as coachmakors’ work. We venture (says a Dunedin paper) to predict there will not be a more creditable work in the Exhibition.

Malvern Coal. — The following information shows the rapid increase of the consumption of Malvern coal. Mr. Joseph B. Sheath, agent for a coalpit at the Malvern Hills, states that the pit he acts for sent away per rail in July, 1870, 345 tons, and this year for the same month 000 tons were sent away, showing the output to have nearly trebled itself. The sale of coals at the pit, for country and local consumption, is of course not included in the above. Thirty miners are employed in the mines.

New Zealand Woods at Home.— There is now on view at the offices of the Emigrants and Colonists’ Aid Corporation, at Westminster (says the European Mail), a table-top made from different kinds of New Zealand woods, which was brought over to this country by Mr. Haicorabe. We understand that one of the objects of the visit of this gentleman to London is to endeavor to open up a trade with Groat Britain for the export of some of the valuable timber of New Zealand, chiefly that used in the manufacture of furniture. Certainly there is a good opening for such a trade ; and from what we have seen of Mr. Halcombe, he is not likely to return to the colony unsuccessful.

The Volunteers. — When the item “ Volunteers—L42,G4o 3s. 9d.” came up in Committee of Supply on Wednesday evening, the vote was reduced by L 10,500 - L 9,000 from capitation, and L 1,500 from the Now Zealand Rifle Association. This means that only six months’ _ capitation will be paid to volunteers this year, and afterwards it will be discontinued. Tim annual prize-firing meeting will also have to ho discontinued, or else the amount of money required for its purposes must be contributed by the public or by the volunteers themselves. It is only proposed to give a capitation allowance to those volunteer companies which exist in the vicinity of disaffected districts. For some time, at least, there is a ju’ohahility that volunteers will have a rather expensive part to perform, but jthp stoppage of the capitation will probably iiqt impair the efficiency of the force.

Honey. —The production of honey is an important and lucrative industry too little attended to in the colonies. The American Government think so much of it that they allow queen bees to be sent by post in paper boxes, with aperatures for the admission of air. The holes are, however, not to be so large as to make it lively for the clerks.

The Unemployed. —Yesterday a meeting of the unemployed at which 300 attended, was held in Cathedral Square, Christchurch. A petition to the President of the United States was read, praying for assistance to emigrate, denouncing the Government of this country as one of misrule, and severely blaming the immigration agency at Homo. A petition to the Governor of New Zealand was also read, in which relief was supplicated, and a threat made of a serious disturbance if relief were not speedy and substantial.

The Loch Awe. —The New Zealand Shipping Company’s chartered ship Loch Awe arrived at Lyttelton yesterday from London, after a passage of ninety days. She brings thirty-six passengers, all of whom are reported as well. One of the Clydesdale entires coming for Messrs. Wilkin and Co., named Lucsall, died on June 30 ; the other, Chancellor, is in splendid condition. The West Coast Rush. —The Mayor of Ross thus advises His Worship of Christchurch :—“ Seeing by Christchurch papers that some persons have advised a trial shipment of the unemployed to this district, I beg to advise you that nothing could happen that would be more to be deplored. While not under-rating the value of the discovery at Mapourika, a large influx of people at present, without capital, would be disastrous both to the district and, more particularly, to the people coming here.” The New Generation. —The Bangitikei Advocate has the following :—For the multiplicity of his resources in a time of trouble a Colonial schoolboy cannot be excelled. Illustrative of this fact, we give the following conversation, as it occurred in one of our schools the other day. Master—“ Why did you not come to school yesterday ?” Boy—“ S’pose I must do what father tells me. ” Master—- “ You must obey my orders, sir.” Boy—- “ Then I must play truant from homo next time they want to keep me V’ Master —“ No, you must bring a note in explanation next day. Boy—(gleefully)—“ Then I must write it myself, ’cos father and mother can’t write a word.

Local Rope Making. —Mr. Seed, ofRangiora, has prepared a number of excellent exhibits of rope from phormium for the Melbourne Exhibition. The larger kinds are particularly well laid up, and the manufacturer is prepared to nave the same tested against the best Manilla. He also forwards twine of the kind which was so admirably adapted to the Deerihg reaping machine last year. This latter is subjected to a special process, which Mr. Seed is now applying for letters patent to protect. He further expects an importation of machinery, which will greatly facilitate him in the work of making ropes and twine of the better class from phormium. At the works, near Rangiora, about SOcwt. of prepared flax is turned out every week, a large proportion being used by the upholsterers.

Comparative Statistics. —ln a recent lecture on his visit to Australia, Dr. Roseby, of Dunedin, quoted statistics to show the condition of the people of New Zealand as compared with the other colonies: —“Just note, in passing,” observed Dr. Roseby, “ how high New Zealand stands. In Queensland and Few Zealand more people get married; in Queensland and New Zealand more children are born ; in ‘Victoria and New Zealand fewer people sign the marriage iv;tli a , rnarlc : in New Zealand public morality—in the particular above indicated—is higher ; and in New Zealand fewer people die, in proportion to the population, than in any of the Australasian colonies. ”

A Brave Priest. —Father Tierney, who acted so bravely at the burning of the Glenrowan Hotel, is the parish priest of Beechworth—a man (says the Manawatu Times ) who cannot be far from seventy years of age. The spectacle of a patriarch of three score and ten undertaking a perilous task while a posse of policemen stood around, and an enthusiastic crowd cheered the hero, must certainly have been a strange one ; and, although we believe a few of the constables were shamed into action, that they should require to be stimulated by such an example is by no means flattering to their courage or manhood. Father Tierney has been located in the Ovens district for the last quarter of a century, and, although now a weak and delicate old man, it. would appear he is a true soldier of the Gross in the strongest meaning of the term.

The Sand-Blast Novelty. —Among the wonderful and useful inventions of the times is the common sand blast. If raised letters, a flower or other emblem, are required on stone, cut the letters, flowers, &c. in wax, and stick them upon the stone ; then pass the stone under the blast, and the sand will cut it atvay. Remove the wax, and you have the raised letters. Take a piece of French plate glass, say two feet by six, and cover it with fine lace, pass it under the blast, and not a thread of lace will be injured, but the sand will cut deep into the glass wherever it js not covered by the lace. Now remove the lace, and you have every delicate and beautiful figure raised upon the glass. In this way beautiful figures of all kinds are cut in glass, and at a small expense. The workmen can hold their hands under the blast without harm, even when it is rapidly cutting away the hardest glass, iron, or stone ; but they •must look out for finger nails, for they will be cut off right hastily. If they put on steel thimbles to protect the nails, it will do little good, for the sand will soon cut them away ; but if they wrap a piece of soft cotton around them they are safe. The philosophy of this is that the sand cuts away and destroys any hard substance, even glass, but does not affect substances that are soft and yielding, like the head, the hand, wax, cotton, or fine laces. '

Irish Pharmacy. —The Medical Times prints the following as a copy of a label taken off a bottle of medicine supplied by a firm of druggists of Cork ;—“ Caution. —To all medicines for outward application this label is attached to the bottles, in order to distinguish it from others for internal use, but persons unablo to read should not be allowed to administer medicines, and never give or take a dose without first perusing the label.—Signed,

Preservation op a Favorite Minister. —’A minister was called in to. see a man who was very ill. After finishing his visit, as he was leaving the house, he said to the man’s wife, “ My good woman, do you not go to any church at all 1” “ Oh yes, sir, we gang to the Barony Kirk.” “Then why in the world did you send for me ? Why didn’t you send for Dr. Macleod ?” “ Na, na, sir, deed no ; we wadna risk him. Do ye no ken it’s a dangerous case o’ typhus V’ Out of the Pale. People’s ideas differ as to what constitutes “society.” For instance, the editor and proprietor of a newspaper in Tasmania was recently remonstrated with by a young clergyman, who pointed out to him that his organ of public opinion was chi oily made up of scurrility, blasphemy, and indecency. In the full fury of his zeal, the young ecclesiastic wound up by saying “In England man a who edited such a paper would be considered outside the social pale.” The editor calmly replied, “In Tasmania, sir, no man is considered outside the social pale until he’s hanged. ”

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18800803.2.5

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 134, 3 August 1880

Word Count
2,528

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 134, 3 August 1880

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