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PARLIAMENTARY

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. ; Thursday, July 29. The Treasury Bills. Bill was passed through Committee unaltered, the Hon. G. M. Waterhouse protesting that under the power given to issue treasury bills in London, the Government would be able to break their engagement not to borrow for three years. The debate on the appointment of a Committee to enquire into Mr. Taiaroa’s disqualification was resumed. The debate lasted nearly the whole afternoon. After a long an i personal discussion, a Committee was appointed to enquire into the subject of the disqualification. The debate on the cost of education was resumed by. The Hon. Captain Fraser, who said that the expense to the State might be lessened a third if children were kept away from school until the seventh; or eighth year, as was advocated by medical men and leading writers on education. The debate was adjourned, and the Council rose at 5 p.m.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. Wednesday, July 28. EVENING SITTING. The motion for recommittal of the Native Lands Court vote was negatived on the voices.

Mr. Tele brought up the case of a man named Edmonds who claimed compensation; ..from the Government for a vessel destroyed by the rebel natives fifteen years ago. ' Mr. Tole said the claim had been partlyi recognised' already, 1 and he asked that a reasonable sum by way of compensation should. be ; placed on the estimates, and moved accordingly. Mr. Bryce opposed the motion as it would open the way for a host of similar claims.

, Sir G. Grey supported the claim as it was different from; .most of the native disturbances claims. , . ■-

Mr. Hall would agree to an enquiry, but opposed the establishment of a precedent. , Mr. Sheehan favored the claim.

Mr. Macandrew opposed it, as claims to the amount of a million pounds would follow its recognition.. Still some of these claims might be well based, and their grand total might be ascertained. ; Mr. Gisborne spoke in a similar strain.. Major Te Wheoro was of opinion that claims of this kind should be considered on their merits, adding that there were a number of just claims on the part of Maoris, coming out of similar cases, which ought to be looked into Mr. Tole’s motion was put and negatived on the voices SUPPLY. An Imprest Supply Bill of L 250,000 was passed, as also a resolution authorising the issue of deficiency bills to the amount of L 200,000. Thp Estimates were then gone on with, when the following reductions took place ; —Survey Department—L93,476 3s. 4d., reduced by L 5,000. ‘ Volunteers—L42,64o, reduced ,by L 9,000. Constabulary and contingent defences—Ll3B,2l3 17s. 6d., reduced by L 9,000. Thursday, July 29.' The House met at 2.30. Mr. Kelly brought up the report of the Public Petitions Committee on the petition of Mr. Ehrenfried, complaining that the Licensing Bench at the Thames had refused a renewal of the licenses to five houses in that district. The Committee found that the Bench were authorised by the Act to judge whether or not it was in the public interest that such licenses should be granted or refused, and the Committee advised that the House should not interfere in the matter. , The Hon. J.; Bryce asked leave to introduce the Maori Detention .Bill. As it was a matter of urgency, he requested that he might be allowed to carry it through all its stages to-morrow.' Mr. Saunders gave notice of motion for the appointir ent of a Select Committee to consider and report upon the expense of the officials connected with both Houses of Parliament. ■ ' Replying to Mr. Masters, / ’ The Hon. R. Oliver said that Government recognised the importance, and next session would introduce a Bill to amend the Regulation of Mines Act, 1874, to provide for the issue within the colony of certificates of competency as managers of coal mines to those persons who are anxious to pass an examination to prove their fitness to hold such. The preference shown by coal owners to appoint certificated managers only was placing at a disadvantage those who, though thoroughly competent, cannot now obtain certificates in the colony. The Oamaru Harbor Board Bill was read the. third time, arid passed. TARANAKI SMELTING WORKS. The House went into Committee on the Taranaki Iron Smelting Works Land Act, 1874, Amendment Bill. The Hon. Major Atkinson protested against the Bill, as giving away the public estate, but as the House had decided on carrying the Bill, he would nol further oppose.it. He showed that' the company had not fulfilled the conditions of the: grant. They had not raised the requisite; capital, and to make good the deficiency they had granted a certain number of, shares to a man named Smith, on account of a patent said to belong to him. On asking the chairman if, in the event of the company being -wound up, they would be prepared to pay Smith the amount of, these shares, the reply was—“ Oh, no. He (Smith) would have no claim at all.” The company had never acted in good faith, and no effort had been made to smelt iron. It was simply giving away 5,000 acres of the public estate.

Messrs. Macandrew and Ballance denied that no effort had been inade to smelt iron, the former stating that he was present and witnessed a smelting experiment, and the latter that L6OO had been spent on appliances.

The Hon. W. Rolleston said he would vote in every way against the Bill, with a view of preventing, if possible, a fraud being perpetrated on the public. Colonel Trimble said the company’s capital was not bona fide. It was simply a loan, being put away until this claim had been asserted, and afterwards would be paid back-to the lender with interest. Mr. Murray said he had ascertained that shares had been bought up by speculators, in the hope of this Bill passing, and thereby making something out of them. The complexion of the transaction had changed materially in his estimation. Mr. Turnbull said that a goodly number of shares were held by residents in the South Island, and that the land was promised at the time the company was formed and the shares subscribed for. In that case, he considered it would be a hardship to withhold the land, simply because the affair had not, turned .out- successfully MW Kelly said'that there whs ho intention of making up the capital to work the sand. They had simply made it up to secure the land. The affair had not been a bona fide one. He contended that the company had neither complied with the letter nor spirit of the condition under which the grant was promised.

Mr. Stewart said that this was an attempt to deprive the company of its just rights. Their proceedings throughout proved a bona fide intention on the part of the company. They had spent more than twice the amount which by law they were bound to spend.

The Bill passed through Committee, and was reported without amendment. The House adjourned at 5.30.

evening sitting.

The House resumed at 7.30. The Hon. Major Atkinson moved that the House meet to-morrow morning at eleven o’clock, to dispose of Bilteof anonpolitical character, more especially the Revision of Statutes Bill. Nothing but unopposed Bills would be taken, and if they found any Bill opposed, they would agree to its postponement. The motion was put and carried. The District Courts Act, 1858, Amendment Bill was withdrawn. The .Municipal Corporations Act Amendment and Friendly Societies Act Amendment Bills were The Fire Brigade and Hospital and Charitable Aid Endowment Bills wore reported with amendments. Mr. De Lautour moved the second reading of the Education Reserve Actj -1877, Amendment BilL

The Government agreed : to the taotion on the understanding that a full discussion would take place on committal, and the motion was carried. '

The Justices of the Peace Act, 1866, Amendment Bill was discharged; and the Mines Act, 1877, Amendment Bill postponed. •_ '■ _ “ The House went into Committeeon the New Zealand University and University Colleges Bill. Sir 6. M. O’Rorke expressed surprise that no notice had been taken by the Government of the , recommenda,tjqij by the Commission of higher education. He had seen the advantage that the South Island obtained from its university, and he earnestly desired to see the North Island enjoy similar advantages. After every possible allowance for the straightened circumstances .of -the colony, he hoped the Government would make the concession sought for‘in the cause of higher education in the - North Island. Whatever the issue might be he felt sure that the present state of matters in the North Island would not be tolerated much longer. ' On clause 2 being proposed, The Hon. W. Rolleston moved that progress be reported. Sir G.: Grey said that' their primary education required to. be supplemented by education of a higher order. . He believed that the establishment of four colleges in New Zealand,' all teaching different branches of education, would turn out men of varied knowledge and attainments. He saw an objection to only four being established, as they ; would have one at Dunedin, one .at Christchurch, one at Wellington, and the fourth at Auckland. That would place them all on the 5 East Coast. He would like to see one established say at Taranaki, and one on the West Coast of the Middle"lsland; ’ 13

Mr. Montgomery agreed with what had been said as to the desirability of the establishment of colleges in the,.North Island. - ' Mr. Macandrew said, that the BilLproposed to spend L 30,000 on buildings, and LBOOO per annum on professors... .That was more than the colony could at present afford. The North could if it liked take advantage of the South Island Universities. There were valuable.endowments,.in. the North Island, and they might he devoted to the purpose, at all events, of establishing at least one University. -\- Mr. Moorhouse said, that, if education or religion were worth having) they ought to be paid for by those getting them. Public propriety ought to recogriise/ita duty of maintaining both'its religious-rind educational institutions without , making them a charge oh the' state., He didinot believe in endowments'. The _ best way was to sell thern, pay the debts, and make the public pay for these arid other advantages. ‘ V i / 7 \ Mr. Hurst was afraid that the j colony was in danger of falling into. the extreme of over-educating. The result was that the professional walks.of life,'those of barristers, &6., ‘were being crowded, ffi to the detriment of other pursuits more directly of a reproductive character.' V* Mr. Moss cautioned them against-the superficial style of education followed put in some of the colonial universities'. • ’ S The motion for reporting progressicvriis carried. 5 > Mr. Hutchison moved the second reading of the Chinese Immigration, Bill. The Hori. Major Atkinspn said, that the Government was in communication with the other colonies with a view .pf concerting joint action, on . the subject. He hoped that would be. sufficient,, to> justify the withdrawal of the 8i11.'.: t .lt.iwas a measure which ought, to' be taken in hand by the Government'' ' Mr. Hutchison said.he. would be content to take the fate of the Bill .pn. the voices. The Bill was ultimately witHdf awiri \ Mr. Reeves moved the second steading of the Mining Companies’ Act;-'-T872, Amendment Bill.: . ’ The motion was agreed to, and the Bill ordered to go before the Qoldfields Coramittee. - lj ■ '• ’li- t A : . Mr. Moorhouse briefly moved the second reading; of ; the Deceased Wife’s Sister Marriage Bill. Mr. Macandrew said that every member . had no doubt made up his mindi oiDthe question, so ho would without remark move that the Billbe read a ; seconditime that day six months. j u On a division the second reading was carried by 27 to 9. ; > The following'is the division list : • . Ayes, 29—Messrs. .Atkinson, Barron, DeLautour, Dick, Ji T. ;Fisher,. Fulton, .Gisborne, Hamlin, Hirst, H. Hurst, W. J. Hursthouse,. Jones; Kelly, Masters, Montgomery, Modrhouse, Olivea, Reeves, Rolleston, Seymour, Shanks, Shephard, Shrimski, Swanson, Trimble, -Whitaker, Wright. Noes, 9—Messrs. Bowen, Harris, Hutchison, Lundon. Macandrew, Tainui, Tawhai, Tomoana, Walhs. Mr. Moorhouse, wished to havethe.Bill committed forthwith, but Dr. Wallis obecting, this could not be done. On the motion that it becommitted next Thursday, f ; ; Mr. Swanson moved the additional words “at 7.30.” _ /r This led to some discussion, and the motion as amended was carried. The House then rose.- •- ; Friday, July 30. The House met at 11 pclock., . : r Mr. Hall moved the second reading of the Counties Act Amendment Bill. Referring to the clause providing that in case, of counties where the Act, is not in operation the Governor is empowered to exercise the functions of the Council,, there might be a difference of opinion, arid if he found that a majority was against tlat proposal he would be prepared to-forego' it. ' , : :,r The motion was carried, - and. the Bill, ordered to be committed presently.; i \,’<r Major Atkinson moved the second read-, ing of the Transfer Act Amendment! Bilk The object of the Act was to obviate, issue’ of Crown grants, thereby expediting . the completing of titles, and save .a. considerable amount of money to the country. , Sir G. Grey said that the presentrsystem was a modification’of the one in operation at the Cape of Good Hope. There two Crown grants were drawn —one in the Land Grants Office, and the other held by the grantee. When a transfer, took place, the parties went to the Crown Grants Office arid had the transaction, en-. dorsed on both, grants, thereby . obviating the expensive and Cumbersome system, rof transfer still in vogue.. ; Vi . Major Atkinson said, that the present proposal was not to deal with the registration of titles, but he would keep the suggestion in view, considering it a valuable one. Sir George Grey said he .would jmakeiau; effort to have the proposal introducpdantp the Bill. Its effect would be that" parties transferring property would go to the office, and for the sum of 10s. 6d. get the

• London, July 29. Consols have further declined, and are to-day quoted at 97^. New Zealand securities are unchanged. The market for Adelaide and New Zealand breadstuffs continues quiet, and without change in price. Australian tallow is without quotable change. The Orient Company’s steamship, Goto paxi, homeward bound, arrived at Sue yesterday. The Australians have comraencsd a match against eighteen of the Alexandra Club, at Crewe, in Cheshire. The Australians went in firsthand scored ninetyfour : rhns. The Home team then went in and were disposed of for thirty-seven. At the close of the day’s play, the Australians in their second innings had lost one wicket for sixteen runs. London July 28.. Trickett, who arrived in England on Monday last, hy the s.s. Orient, is going shortly' to Scotland, where he will commence his training. 1 Constantinople, July 29. The Porte, replying to the ultimatum -of the Powers, promises to take steps to enforce the strict execution of the decision of,the Berlin Conference, as regards Montenegro, within three weeks. St. Petersburg, July 28. The last Russian war vessel ordered to the Pacific, in view of possible hostilities with China, left Cronstdat to-day. Mauritius, July 16. Sailed—Kate Tatham, with 350 tons of , : sugar, for Melbourne. Calcutta, July 28. News, has-been received from Afghanistan that Abdul Rahman has left Charikar for the purpose of having an interview with the British general at Zunina, when the question of the Ameership will be again discussed.

; ' ■ : AUSTRALIAN. [(Per Reuter's Agency.) , . Brisbane, July 29. In the Legislative Assembly the members sat all night and still continue, and v?ill probably not rise till noon .to-mor-rbw, owing ‘to the Opposition “ stonewalling” on the mail contract for a direct Service between England and Queensland via Torres Straits, which had been arranged for by the Premier whilst in England. Melbourne, July 28. Arrived—Rotomahana, from the Bluff. Sailed—Albion, for New Zealand,, yesterday. ■" His Excellency the Marquis of Normanby on receiving the address in reply expressed his regret that reference had been made to the , want l of confidence motion, which was moved on Friday last, as being unconstitutional. Mr. Service has tendered his resignation to the Governor, and Mr. Berry has been summoned for the purpose of forming a new Ministry. In the Legislative Assembly, supply has been passsed and the House has adjourned till Tuesday. . n Melbourne, July 29. . The Age to-day criticises adversely the Governor’s remarks regarding the reference in the address in reply to the motion passed on Friday re vote of no confidence. . . Melbourne, July 30. _ Mr. Berry is still negotiating with Sir John O'Shannasy and Mr. Wrixon, with a view to the formation of a new Ministry. It is stated to be unlikely that Sir John ‘O’Shannasy will accept office, as the education; question hinders an understanding with Mr. Berry. .By a fire at Bendigo, which burned down ■ Cameron’s billiard room, the National Company lose L3OO. Sydney, July 28. Wakatipu, from Wellington. The rush which has taken place to Temara still continues. There is no water, and all are mostly stacking. INTERPROYIN Cl AL. ■ (Per Press Association.) Auckland, July 28. A child two years old, the son of a man named Connell, was found dead this morning under somewhat strange circumstances. It was in perfect heath last night', but this morning, when the mother lifted it from the cradle it was quite cold. * . • _ , • Auckland, July 30. At the half-yearly meeting of the Working Men’s Club, the report shewed receipts, L 936 J balance over expenditure, Lll3. , , , The Auckland Gas Company declared a 15 per cent, dividend. A further reduction in the price of gas will be made shortly. .r,,:. > : Alexander Martin was charged with acting as a conveyancer, he not being a barrister or solicitor of the Supreme Court. Prisoner, who was concerned in the forgery of the said deed of conveyance, but had turned Queen’s evidence, ■ pleaded guilty, and was fined LSO, or in default, one months’ imprisonment, without hard labor. ■ Gisborne, July 28. The Court was occupied all the afternoon in hearing the perjury case against Mr; Rees; Mr.- Cooper applied for a re mand, as he was unable to obtain counsel to prosecute in Gisborne. After an hour’s deliberation the Justices decided to go on with the case, so Mr. Cooper prosecuted the case himself. While going on with the case, Mr. Rees sent several Natives to .Mr, Cooper’s farm, and they broke open the gates and drove all Cooper’s stock to the pound. It is expected that this r action will cause a charge of forcible entry to be laid. The Court adjourned till tomorrow. New Plymouth, July 28. A slight shock of earthquake was felt here about 5 o’clock. New Plymouth, July 30. The Gas Company held a meeting yesterday, when the chairman stated that the Company had been in operation four months. There were eighty-four consumers, and the gas sold during the four months realised L 263. The price charged was 15s. per 1,000 ft., cash, which was a lower price than any Company in New Zealand hadjstarted with. > Wellington, July 29.

A deputation, consisting of the members of the City Council, Hutt County Council, Makara Highway Board, and the Chamber of Commerce, also, a large number of. influential citizens, waited on the Minister for Public Works and strongly urged Government to prosecute the Wel-lington-Foxtqn Railway. Mr. Oliver replied that the report of the l Railway Commission would bear certain weight, but the question would receive earnest consideration, and a reply would be made known through the Public Works Statement, which would be given in a few days. : Wellington, July 30. The Education Board passed a resolution to the effect that the salaries of teachers would be reduced, in consequence of the capitation allowance being reduced. Wanganui, July 28. A heavy shock of earthquake occurred about 5.15 to-night. It was the heaviest felt for many years. Several chimneys suffered. • The Court House was burglariously, entered last night by thieves, who got through the window of the bailiffs room, and burst open the door leading into the clerk’s room. The attempt made to open the safe was unsuccessful, and the drawers were rummaged, but nothing taken. It is thought that the thieves were after documents, and not cash, - Oamaku, July 30. • ' Captain Stevens, ot the schooner Lizzie sGrey; 1 states' that -his mai^' T wa,B ’.trashed overboard and drowned off Hokitika, on the 22nd inst., during a gale.

grant endorsed and the transfer completed. It was of great importance that property should be transferred with the same facilities as bank notes.

The motion was carried, and the committal ordered for Monday. Mr. Hall moved the second reading of the Rabbit Nuisance Bill. The nuisance was becoming a formidable one : not less than 500,000 acres of land having been abandoned in consequence thereof. The Bill was similar to the one now in existence, with the addition of a few clauses. Subsequent experience had shown it desirable.

Mr. Seymour asked that as the Bill involved the question of taxation it should be postponed. It was a consolidation of a variety of measures for dealing with the nuisance in different parts in New Zealand, and as such it should be considered by a full House. Mr. Bain endorsed the remarks of the previous sneaker, stating he expected a representation on the subject from (Southland.

Sir George Grey concurred, and moved that the second reading bo postponed.

Mr. Hall consented to the posponement, and the motion for adjournment was carried.

Mr. Dick moved the second reading of the Census Act Amendment Bill, introduced at the request of the Imperial Governmentthatall the Australasian Colonies, as well as the United Kingdom, should take the census on the 3rd of April next year. The motion was agreed to. Mr. Rolleston moved the second reading of the Arms Bill, which was carried. The following'Bills were read a second time ;—Banks and Bankers ; Bills of Exchange Procedure; Mercantile Law; Chattels Securities; Building Societies; Animals Protection; Married Womens’ Property Protection; Aliens; Marriage; Juries; Cruelty to Animals ; Deaths by Accident Compensation ; Adulteration Prevention ; Thames Water Supply Transfer ; Fisheries Bill. The above Bills, with the exception of the two last mentioned, were considered in Committee, read a third time and passed, as also the Census Bill. Mr. Stewart presented a petition from 350 railway employees, praying for reconsideration of the resolution to reduce their wages. Mr. Bryce introduced the Maori Prisoners Bill. He said the prisoners were part of an organisation setting itself up in opposition to the authority of the Queen. That was the reason the arrests had been made. He hoped, as a question of policy, the House would pass the measure through all its stages without discussion. He moved its second reading. Replying to Sir George Grey, Mr. Bryce said that no notice had been given to the natives of the penalties to which they would bo subjected to under this Bill. The motion was carried.

In Committee, Mr. J. R. Fisher pointed out that, as the Bill was worded, natives charged with all manner of offences murder, felony, etc., would come under the operation of the Act. Mr. Bryce admitted the objection, but did not see how it was to be obviated.

Sir George Grey suggested that a provision should be inserted that the Act should apply to all arrests made by the police, subject to the approval of the Native Minister. The clause was amended to make it read —“ arrests made by authority of Government. ”

Sir George Grey protested against the amendment made, and denounced it as unconstitution and illegal. The Bill, as amended, was reported. On the motion for its third reading, Mr. Montgomery protested against the Bill, stating that had Government done its duty, and proclaimed the West Coast a disturbed district, this irregularity would have been avoided.

Sir George Grey also protested. With a few minutes’ delay, the Bill could have been made more acceptable than it was. He reprobated the undue haste in passing the measure.

Mr. Reader Wood said the House had taken up a false position in passing the measure and throwing the responsibility of its passing on the Government. Without desiring to impede Government, he denounced the measure as a most untenable one.

Mr. Bryce replied that Government had given evidence it was quite prepared to accept the fullest measure of responsibility for the passage of the Act. Referring to the remarks of Mr. Wood, he said that member was a free lance, and gloried in the vagaries of irresponsibility. He ventured, however, to say if the passage of the Bill rested with the hon. member individually, he dare not take upon himself the responsibility of preventing the measure passing. The House divided—Ayes, 41; noes, 24.

On the motion that the Bill do now pass, Mr. Speight recorded his protest that the Bill was a tacit admission that they were unable to govern the natives by the same laws they governed themselves. Mr. Pyke also denounced the Bill as cruel and unconstitutional.

Mr. Pitt defended the Bill, and Messrs. Moss, Te Wheoro, and Sir George Grey spoke in strong terms against it. Mr. Bryce replied, and the motion was agreed to. The House adjourned at 5'30.

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PARLIAMENTARY Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 133, 31 July 1880

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