Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE ALLEGED LARCENY CASE.

To the Editor. Sir, —Haying been summoned on Thursday in the Ashburton Police Court under the charge of “feloniously stealing” goods belonging to Joseph Barieva, perhaps a s few words of explanation may not be out ; of place in vindication of my character, * and pro bonojmhlico. When I was first employed as washer- ! woman by the person who calls herself Emily Evans, I was not aware that it was , a house of “ ill-fame,” and some time t afterwards I learned that the said Emily ; Evans had a legal husband in Wellington. 3 I sometimes spoke to her respecting the 3 immoral life she was living, and she fret quently wept in my presence, and exc pressed an earnest desire to reform her ways and return to her own home. She I ultimately requested me to write and ask i her husband to send for her, and I did so. t He replied, saying that if her repentance t was genuine, ho"would forget the past, t and arrange for their re-union. The day r previous to my getting this letter, Barieva f was arrested for having no visible means of support. At this time he was L 7 in my debt, and the said Emily Evans at once ordered me to take the furniture to I my house until my debt was discharged. * And out of pure kindness I sheltered this woman in my home, telegraphed her hus- [ band for advice, and hoped to save her from a life of shame. In the meantime, 7 I have been most unjustly dragged into ’ Court, charged as a “ common felon,” and J have been subjected to great inconvenience and expense; and, in addition to this, there is an impression abroad that I have been encouraging characters of “ill-fame.” I wish the public to know that I should never have opened my door to this woman had it not been for the distinct purpose of assisting her return to her husband. He has communicated with me both by letter and telegram, and has been making ’ preparations for the speedy return of his wife, and I fondly believed that I was doing a Christianly action. But, behold the result! » There are several points decidedly untrue in the evidence given, especially by ' Bariera, who though sworn a rogue and a vagabond, was treated with all the grace g and courtesy of an honest citizen ; and the conduct of the judge, while Mr. Q O’Reilly was cross-examining him, might “ be severely criticised. One of the con- ' stables, also, was very particular to say what he found when searching my house, evidently making it appear that I had concealed a portion of the goods, but he t never took the trouble to say that it was I B who pointed out the various articles to him, or he would never have discovered . them by his own acuteness, t But as the case was dismissed, I will 3 not further occupy your space, and will " thank you for the insertion of this letter . in your next issue,—l am, &c. r Ann James, i i To the Editor. 1 Sir —Not a little excitement was proi duced in the town on Thura’ay by the 1 charge alleged against Mrs. James of 3 feloniously stealing, ard any one who was * present at the Court must have been sur--1 prised at the case lasting so long. It was , very palpable to any impartial hearer that 3 Mrs. James was perfectly innocent, 3 although every effort appeared to be made i to bring her in guilty. The Judge was 3 exceedingly deferential to Bariera while r pleading his own case, and occasionally rendered him good service on the plea of * his being a foreigner, and Mr. O’Reilly was impertinently corrected, simply because * his Worship had not sagacity enough to ! see the drift of Bariera’s cross-examina-tion. Mr. O’Reilly repeatedly took ex--1 ception to some of the witnesses on the ' other side being allowed to be present in 1 the ante-room, but by some of the officers ' great reluctance to remove them was manifested. What staggered me most was ! the fact that Bariera, who admitted himself to be a rogue and vagabond, and is even now a prisoner for having no visible means of support, appeared yesterday as a respected householder, owning some L3O worth of goods, and the Police were present to defend his rights. Can any of yoi.r readers give a little light on the subject, and oblige New Chum.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
751

THE ALLEGED LARCENY CASE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 115, 19 June 1880

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working