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The County Engineer invites tenders for drainage works at Tinwald and Wheeler’s Creek.

Longbeach Road District.—As will be seen in our advertising columns, the Longbeach Road District is about to be divided into wards.

Farmers’ Supplement. —A quantity of information, useful and interesting, will be found in the columns of the Supplement published with this morning s issue.

Ashburton Steeplechases. The members of the Steeplechase Committee have arranged to meet at Mr. Hunt’s farm at 3 o’clock on this afternoon, for the purpose of selecting a course. Drunk. —An old offender, named Marten Moran, alias Wearn, against whom ten previous convictions were recorded, was lined ss. on Tuesday, at the 11. M. Court.

The Borough’s Auditors. Three gentlemen were nominated on Tuesday to fill the position of auditors to the Borough Council. As only two are required, a poll is announced to be taken on Tuesday next.

The Gas Company.— The meeting of the Gas Company called for yesterday fell through for want of a quorum, and was adjourned till Monday, 7th inst., at three o’clock.

Alleged Theft of a Watch and Chain. —A man named Lane was charged yesterday before Mr. C. P. Cox with the theft of a watch and chain from John Symons at the Royal Hotel on Tuesday. Ho was remanded till Friday. To Heads of Families. —Mr. Thomas Taylor informs us that, in consequence of the supply of good things at the Good Templar soiree on Monday being in excess of the demand, he has on hand a large quantity of cakes, tarts, and other edibles which he is desirous of disposing of at exceedingly low pi-ices. We recommend heads of families to pay Mr. Taylor a visit at once.

Pugilistic. —Three men, named respectively William Stothers, Robert Falkner, and Charles Smith, were charged, before Mr. Guinness, on Tuesday, with committing a breach of the peace. Constable Warring gave evidence that the accused were fighting in the public streets and creating a disturbance. His Worship fined Stothers L 5 and tfc e two other offenders were let off with a fine of 10s. each, or in default, 48 hours’ imprisonment.

Civil Cases. —There were but few cases called on at the Court on Tuesday, and all but one were adjourned. In the case of Passmore v. Johnson, Mr. Branson obtained an adjournment till Friday, 11th June,. A number of cases brought by the Borough Council against defaulting ratepayers, were, on the application of Mr. Crisp, adjourned until Friday next. Mr. Crisp appeared for the plaintiff in M‘Rae v. Bates, and obtained judgment by default for the amount claimed, L3O, and L 4 9s, fid. costs, and immediate execution granted. The Froliques. —Last night this company gave its promised entertainment m the Town Hall. The advertisements announced their appearance as by request, but we saw nothing in the entertainment to warrant any one going into ecstacies over it. The singing is good, hut not superlatively so. The nigger business is commonplace, and the fun not of the most furious kind. “Zittella” is very effective in a flag song, and makes some very smart changes of costume, her appearance generally being very pleasing. Miss Lottie Elliot is a clever dancer ; she is called an “ endurance” dancer, and she deserves the term, for she shows good “ staying power ” in her long spell at the skipping rope ; but another foot of length to Jior skirts would not have detracted from her appearance. There was a very fair house.

Land Sale.— At Tinwald on Tuesday Messrs. Acland, Campbell, and Co. put up to auction 180 half and quarter-acre building sections in the township of Chelmsford. The day was wet, and the attendance was less than certainly would have been the case in bettor weather, but as it was, a fair business was done. We give below the sales that took place, with number of section, price, and purchaser. The numbers marked with an asterisk are corner sections : Section, Price per Sec. Purchaser. 4-acres £. s. d. 167 * 0 5 0 R. Nealan 168-170 4 0 0 R. Nealan 171* 9 10 0 R. Nealan 172 G 15 0 R. Nealan 173* 10 15 0 J. Cole 174* 8 0 0 Ford 195 8 0 0 Ford 176-180 5 0 0 Ford -£-acres. 181-3 8 5 0 Patterson 183-4 4 5 0 „ 185 4 15 0 Cole 180* XI 10 0 Housten

Ashburton A. and P. Association.— It will bo remembered'that at the last meeting of members of the Agricultural and Pastoral Association, it was decided to hold monthly meetings for reading papers and discussing matters of fanning interest. The first of these meetings is announced to be held on Tuesday evening next, in the new upstairs room of the Town Hall, on which occasion Mr. F. Guinness will deliver an introductory address. All Hot. —Under this .attractive heading our worthy townsman, Mr. Thomas Taylor, East street, announces that in future hot tea and coffee, accompanied with a hot pie, can be had at his shop at all hours. Mr. Taylor has had an ingenious contrivance fitted up, by which the tea, coffee, and pies are kept in a steaming hot state, and we have no doubt but that our country friends especially will give the shop frequent calls during the coming winter months, at which period of the year such refreshments arc in especial demand. Good Shooting. —On Monday last a pigeon shooting tournament was hold near the Spread Eagle, and sportsmen, dogs, and game of various descriptions, breeds, and calibres, were in attendance. We are unable to give a detailed score of the events, but are informed that the quantity of powder and lead fired away was something tremendous. As a criterion of the amount of slaughter, we can state that one resident here sold the pigeon club 54 birds, of which 37 returned home within a day or so of the shooting match. Others are arriving hourly, and he expects the whole of them back by the end of the week. As he sold them at Is. Cd. per pair, he is anxious to know when another similar event is likely to come off. He reckons it beats growing oats into fits.

Horticultural Society. —The usual monthly meeting of the Horticultural Society was heldon Tuesdayin Mr. Anstee’s Private Hotel. After the usual routine business, Mr. Egbert Mayo read a short but interesting paper on “ Window Gardening,” in the course of which he gave some practical hints as to the making of a neat and ornamental box for outside a cottage window. Discussion followed, in the course of which some valuable information on the potting of plants, watering, &c., was elicited. It often occurs that amateur gardeners are in doubt as to when certain plants require water. In addition to the limp appearance that thirsty plants present, Mr. George Smith said a good way to find out whether plants wanted water was to ascertain whether the earthenware pot was sound. If it were sound, a sharp blow administered to it would make it ring if the plant wanted water, because then the soil would be dry and bard, whereas if the soil were moist the sound produced would be dull and heavy. It was ruinous to a plant to place its pot in a saucer, and fill up the saucer with water, as that only made the soil sodden and liter.illy drowned the plant. It was right to use a saucer for cleanliness, but the drainage of the pot should be attended to. It was also far better to give a plant a thorough soaking at once, than to give it only a very little at a time. A discussion on the best sort of plants to use for the windows inside also took place. After the discussion on Mr. Mayo’s paper had concluded, a vote of thanks was passed to that gentleman, and then the draft schedule of prizes for next show, prepared by a sub-committee was discussed, and several alterations made. Mr. Jacobson will read a paper at the next meeting, but the subject was not announced.

Burnham Escapees. —Two lads, one named Eli Jones and another named Best, were charged before Mr. C. P. Cox, J.P., yesterday, with the theft of a cheque from a tent at Rakaia. The theft had been committed some time ago—in fact, when the lad Joneson a former occasion had escaped from Burnham, and been recaptured. On that occasion, though he was suspected and searched, no trace of the cheque could be found upon his person. On Monday, however, he again made his appearance in Rakaia, having once more taken French leave from Burnham Industrial School, this time in company with a fellow-inmate of that institution. On that day the two nude an attempt to cash the cheque at at Messrs. Mulligan and Co. ’s store, but the history of the document was too well known, and the trick was not successful. In answer to inquiries as to how they came by the cheque one of them, away from his companion, said it had been paid to him and his brother as wages for 13 weeks’ work, and said brother was outside waiting. On the “ brother ” being questioned, he showed that Master Jones’ explanation as to how the cheque was come by was quite an extempore speech, for he denied any blood affinity with him. The shopman kept the boys until a constable w;-s brought, and they were then taken into custody. On being searched an “olio of oddities ” sufficient to stock a broker’s shop was gathered from their pockets—knives, candle ends, pieces of tobacco, and all sorts of little unconsidered trifles, including a catechism that has evidently had little moral effect upon the young rascals. It turns out that when first searched Master Jones had the cheque hid between the leather and the lining of his boots, and so evaded the constable’s scrutiny. Yesterday Mr. Cox remanded the lads till Friday. How Ted Oughten Was Had. —We have in Ashburton one or two peds that take a lot of licking. Two of those are J. Groves and Ted Oughten. Groves goes in for long spells, and Ted for short flashes. Both went to Timaru to the sports of the Athletic Club of that town, on the Queen’s Birthday. It appears that the Athletic Club has a rule that all competitors must pay a qualification fee of 10s. 6d. before they can enter—in fact, become members of the Club.. This is quite fair and above-board, so long as “’tis so nominated in the bond.” But Groves and Ted aver that no such proviso appeared in the published programme of the sports, and therefore they consider themselves ill-used. Groves entered for the mile, and got a handicap of 75 yards. He was allowed to strip for the contest, and had toed the line with the others before he heard anything of the half-sov., and then he wag told it was time to “anty-up.” He remonstrated and paid under protest, but even with this trial to his temper, lie ran second, and landed some Timaru money. Ted is a little more fiery, and speaks his mind freely of the Timaruvians. He entered on the ground, but Groves entered on the 14th. Not a ■whisper did either of them hear of the 10s. fid. till they were ready to start. Ted’s essay was in the Maiden, and he, too, had stripped and toed the line, when he was asked for his 10s. fid. Ted isn’t a lamb, and we can easily fancy that he would not look very sweet as he stood in his tights, shivering in the cold air, chattering with the Secretary for this money. He paid it, however, under protest, and ran. It is quite fair, to bo sure, for a club to lay down a rule that all who compete for its prizes shall bo members ; but there is a certain amount of civility necessary in enforcing that rule. When no hint of the rule is given in the published programme, and the entries of strangers from a distance are accepted, the least that could be done would to let them know that such a fee will be charged, and surely not defer till the men have stripped and toed the line, Evjdeptjy the Timaru Athletic Club want a Secretary who knows Jiis business.

Te Wbiti at Home. —Te Whiii is having a considerable amount of clear ng done at Parihaka, and the land prepared for putting in a larger area of crops next season than he has ever done in any previous year.

The Racecourse Accidents. Hankins and Keith, who were hurt in the races on Monday, are progressing favor® ably. Sunday (Trading. —The case against the man Marks—“ Wicked Marks”—the fruiterer, in Christchurch, is to be heard before Mr. Hellish to-day. Death of Swindler. —The steeplechaser Swindler, which fell at the Grand National on Monday, died that night, while entering the box. Girls’ High School eor Christchurch. —The Board of Governors of the Canterbury College have accepted the tender of Messrs. Greig and Hunter for the erection of the new Girls’ High School, at a cost of L4,5G9 Bs. 9d.

The Colliers’ Strike. —Much trouble has been caused throughout Australia by the strikes of the Newcastle colliers, and many factories had to suspend work for a time owing to want of fuel. 2,000 miners are on strike in Newcastle.

A Stray Raet. — A Wellington telegram says ; —Captain Flowerday, of the steamer St. Kilda, reports to the Marine Department that he saw a raft of timber 15ft by 15ft, 2ft deep at Separation Point, bearing W.S.W., ten miles distant, which might be dangerous to shipping.

The Auckland Smuggler. —Mrs. Boslock, the woman who was recently sentenced to to six months imprisonment for smuggling ashore from an English ship a large quantity of jewellery, and evading the customs duties thereon, has been pardoned by the Governor, and released from prison. The Manawatu Steamer Affair. —At the Wellington Police Court, on Tuesday, the charges against the captain and officers of the Manawatu were heard. Captain Doile, for proceeding to sea without the full complement of men, was fined 205., and D. White, the purser, for falsifying the articles, was fined L 5. The charge against the agent, for fraudulently shipping men, was dismissed. Gun Accident at Timaru. —Scarcely a holiday passes when game is in season without some gun accident happening, attended with more or less severe results. In addition to the other accidents we have reported, a gentleman named Peryman, a Timaru resident, on the Queen’s Birthday received a charge of gunshot in his side from a companion’s gun, but was not dangerously injured.

A Prolific Grain of Wheat. —The Secretary to the Agricultural and Pastoral Association has in his possession, at the Society’s offices, a crown containing 70 stalks grown from one grain of Hunter’s white wheat, by Mr J. Snowden, on bis farm, at Dunsandel. Each head yielded the average of 56 plump grains of excellent wheat, or a total of 3,920. grains from a single seed. In the same paddock there were several crowns containing over 50 stalks. — Times.

Christchurch Soup Kitchen.— The Mayor of Christchurch has obtained the use of the old'Christchurch Post office for the establishment of a soup kitchen, and will appeal to butchers, bakers, Ac., to send thither such surplus provisions as they may have. At the meeting of the City Council on Tuesday evening, he stated that the soup kitchen movement had been warmly supported by leading gentlemen in the city, and the Charitable Aid Board knew only too well how much the relief aimed at being given would be wanted during the winter. During a discussion on the subject Councillor Hulbert said there was as much food wasted in the city as might keep all the people requiring aid. Gaol Education.— lt cannot be said (remarks the New Zealand Times) that the authorities at the Wellington Gaol neglect the prisoners so far as education is concerned. The space between tea and bedtime is turned to good account by keejiing school. Those prisoners who can be improved in this way are taught by masters, themselves prisoners, whose ability and good conduct Lave warranted their appointment to such a responsible ;position, and some of the pupils show not a little aptitude, the copybooks of the majority being most creditable. If education tends to prevent crime, then Mr. Read ought certainly to be congratulated upon the fact that he is adopting the best means at his disposal for reforming those whose conduct has caused them to be placed under his care.

A Freak of Nature. —An extraordinary freak of nature is recorded by the Manawatu Times. A butcher was dressing a sheep, when he was astonished to feel a hard substance embedded in layers of fat upon the left side of the animal. Bringing his knife into operation the adipose matter was quickly cut away, when a young lamb in a perfect state of ossification was taken from its resting place. The object, which was thoroughly formed —the eyes alone being wanting—was about twelve inches long by seven inches broad, and was in a sitting position, with its legs doubled underneath it, after the manner of such animals when taking rest. The mass was as hard as a stone, and when weighed turned the scale at six pounds. The opinion of the medical men who have seen this lusns natural is, that it has been embedded in the side of the sheep—which was a six-tooth one—for the past two years, and the most singular part of the affair is that the mother has since been lambing. Ball at the Spread Eagle. —On the Queen’s Birthday a pigeon shooting match took place at the Spread Eagle Hotel, and a good many competitors entered, but the scores made were not extraordinary. In the evening a grand dinner was given in the hotel, and laid out in the handsome style which is characteristic of Host Tisch. After the cloth had been removed and the royal and loyal toasts heartily pledged, the healths of Mr. Tisch and his family were given with all honors. A ball took place afterwards in the large room of the hotel, which was gorgeously decorated for the occasion by the Misses Tisch. The dancing commenced at nine o’clock, and continued till four in the morning, between 30 and 40 couples taking part, amongst whom were many visitors from Ashburton. In the course of the evening the Misses Tisch played • several duets on the piano, and contributed much by their amiability to the success of the evening. The daneg music was supplied by local violinists, and 01 the coarse of tho night several sopgg were sung by gentlemen.

Telephonic Communications, -~ln one thing Melbourne appears to be behind the age, (remarks a Melbourne contemporary). The telephone exchange is in ordinary use in other places as a medium of business communication, and is found to be convenient and an economiser of time, of which the equivalent is money. A man of business in Liverpool thus writes of it to his brother in Melbourne : —“ Writing of new discoveries, &c., we have now been using the telephone at our office for some little time, and as most of the members of the trade have them, the saving in trouble and time is often very great. We talk to one another, pass offers, and make contracts, &c., without ever going out of the office. The company we have to do with supplies the Edison loud-talking machine, and I think it is the best. We pay Ll2 a year, and the company supples everything. We intend shortly to have a wire in communication with our warehouse, which will be very useful, and for this we shall have to pay L 6 per annum extra.” It is stated that Mr. E-ussell, the manager of the new Melbourne Exchange, intends shortly organising a general telephone system in connection with that establishment, which, for the first time, will afford adequate commercial advantages tp th,e mercantile community,

Railway Extension. The PictonBlenheim Railway has been extended into the Blenheim township, and on Tuesday a Imicheon was given by- the Mayor of Blenheim in celebration of the event. Mr. Seymour, M.H.R. for the district, took advantage of the occasion to make a political speech, in which he defended the Government and the party supporting it. He said that Sir George Grey must either be leader of a Government or of an Opposition. As soon as his party deserted him it had fallen to pieces.

The Waimakariri. —The South Waimakar'ri Board of Conservators held a meeting yesterday. When the following resolution was adopted ; —“ That, considering the danger of the river washing a breach at the end of No. 1 bank, it is advisable to construct a new embankment about 15 chains in length about 25 chains higher up the stream, during the present winter, the total cost of which is estimated at LI,OOO. ” The Chairman was authorised to call for tenders for that portion of the work which is usually done by tender.

Religion and Politics. London Truth tells a very characteristic story of Mr. Spurgeon’s political sympathies and his notion of the electoral duties of Liberals. During the recent contest in Lambeth the Conservative candidate called on Mr. Spurgeon and asked his vote on the ground of religious affinity. The answer he received was, “If the Liberal candidate were the Devil in person I should vote for him against you, for the functions to which you and he aspire are political, and not religious, and on political matters I think with him. ” Mr. Henry Labouchere, who, by the way, has been elected, professes to be a warm admirer of the Tabernacle ; and he asked -all Liberals and Radicals to remember these words when the moment f r, r action came. They contain, he thinks, the whole duty of an elector. Of himself, he says in his address to the Lambeth electors :—“ I am a Radical to the Radicals. I have many social fads, and yet I should vote for the most retrograde of Whigs, the bitterest opponent of one and all my social foes, provided lie were sound upon the one point of hostility to the pernicious Imperialism of Lord Beaconsfield.”

A Melbourne Yiew of a New Zealand Unemployed Scheme. —This is the view the Australasian takes of the recent proposal made in Wellington by the unemployed for the construction of the West Coast railway : —“A singular scheme of railway construction was broached at a public meeting held at Wellington, New Zealand, the other day—a scheme which seems to possess the novelty of embodying every possible objection which can lio against any railway proposal of any kind. The scheme is to include railway construction, relief to the unemployed, and land settlement. The railway is to be constructed by men to be paid at ' the rate of 65., 75., and Bs. per day. But out of this they arc to have rations provided by the Government at Is. 3d. per day, and to draw 10s. per week, and the balance to remain to be applied to the purchase-money of land, which the workmen are to be allowed to take up at L2 per acre. At first sight it would seem as though New Zealand must be the real paradise"of the working man, if laborers at a railway can live and pay for a farm out of the wages they earn during its construction. We have said that the scheme is open to every possible objection. In the first place nothing was brought forward in the way of statistics to show whether the line would pay even that modicum of return with which we have to be content in the colonies. Then it is obvious that, whatever else might be wanting, the Government would have undertaken to provide maintenance and pocket money for a whole army of workmen, who, under these happy conditions, w o uld possibly not be in a hurry to complete their work. Then the increase in the value of the land effected by the railway would be pocketed by those to whom the State had given land at LI per acre, which one speaker (whom the meeting wanted to ‘ put out’ at once) declared was worth L 8 to LlO per acre. And finally, if the scheme had any effect of the kind aimed at, it would settle on the land an immense number of men destitute of the means of livelihood, of appliances, and all farming experience. We observe that when it was pointed out that the Government could not sacrifice the public estate, one advanced thinker cried out, ‘ We are the Government, for we are the people,’ ? sentiment which met with much applause. Of course this admirable sentiment makes many difficult matters very easy. You have only to declare yourself the Government, and take what you want. In the meantime, it is worth the consideration of these land reformers whether the best way is not, after all, for men to work for wages, and buy what they want with their money, rather than reduce everything to a general muddle, in which everybody would be living,.not on his own means, but on those of everybody else. ”

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Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 105, 27 May 1880

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