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Borough Council. —A special meeting of the Borough Council is to be held today at two o’clock, to consider the annual balance sheet and auditors’ report. The Borough By-Laws —A draft of the Borough by-laws, which have so long hung fire, was published last night as a supplement to the evening paper, the Ashburton Herald. Agricultural and Pastoral Association. — A meeting of the Committee of this Society is called for next Friday at Shearman’s Hotel, to receive the report of the Yard Committee, and to transact other business. Road Closed. —The Mount Somers Road Board give notice of a proposal to stop a road from the south-east corner of rural section 23518 to the south-east corner of rural section 19975, and to take in exchange a road from the first-men-tioned section to the south-east corner of rural section 21989, joining the Government road at the south-west corner of rural section 25611.

Drunk. —His Worship, theß. M., yesterday dismissed a first offender against the laws of sobriety, giving him a lecture against the evil of too much drink.

The San Francisco Mail. —The Taiaroa, with the San Francisco mail, arrived at Lyttelton on Saturday morning, and the Ashburton portion was forwarded by the 10.35 express. Erratum. •— ln an advertisement announcing the insolvency of Henry Redfern, Tinwald, the debtor was described by a printer’s error as “ farmer,” instead of “tenner.”

Stacey’s Panorama. Stacey’s panorama of Australia and New Zealand was shown in the Town Hall last night to a fair house. The pictures are fair, and fairly described, and the ventriloquism of Mr. Corbett is creditable. Good Templar Anniversary.— The anniversary of the Star of the East Lodge of Good Templars is to be celebrated on the 24th inst. by a tea meeting and entertainment. For the latter we believe some excellent music is in preparation, by amateurs who have not yet appeared in Ashburton. A Nor’-Wester.— On Sunday we were treated to a pretty stiff nor’-wester, one quite strong enough to remind us of old times. The past summer has been exceptionally free from strong nor’ west winds, and w r e had began to think that a permanent change had taken place upon our climate. Sunday, however, changed that opinion, for a stiff, hot, dusty blow continued all day and far into the night. Not a great deal of damage has been done, only some outhouses upset. The Cab Movement.— The moving of the cabs from the stand they have occupied for some some time by the kerb in front of the Somerset Hotel, to the opposite side of the road, has had a very saintary effect, and the footpath has been kept tolerably clear of loafers since the new regime advented. We hope the police, to complete the work, will now clear from the corner of the street the clusters of idlers who are not cabmen, but in the evening are just as great a nuisance as the fellows who hung about tie hotel door.

A Handicappbr for New Zealand.— At the Canterbury Jockey Club meeting, in Christchurch, on Saturday, a notice of motion was given for discussion at the next general meeting, favoring the appointment of a handicapper, with the cooperation of the leading New Zealand Clubs, who would be willing to engage his services. The gentleman is to receive a substantial salary, and attend the various race meetings held in the colony, but to neither own, back, or be in any way interested in the running of horses.

New Grand Stand for Christchurch Racecourse. —At the meeting in Christchurch on Saturday of the Canterbury Jockey Club, it was stated that instructions had been sent to Sydney for plans of a new grand stand to seat 1000 persons, having a sloping lawn in front to accommodate about a similar number. The new building will comprise luncheon room, weighing house, the Judge’s box, steward’s stand, &c. A resolution was carried, instructing the newly elected Committee to take immediate steps for the erection of the 'stand, if the requisite financial arrangements can be made.

Travelling Without a Ticket.— John Boyce, who was slightly elevated on Saturday, started from Christchurch for Chertsey. He had a ticket covering the journey to the latter place, but for some reason or other ho would’nt “ demit ” at Chertsey, and came on to Ashburton. Here he was asked for the difference of fare, but refused to pay. No amount of persuasion would induce him to part, and ultimately Constable Daly got charge of him. Sergeant Felton explained to the refractory one that the day was Saturday, and before he could be tried he would have to honor the cells with his presence during the sacred hours of Sunday and on to Monday morning. This was a view of things John Boyce had not taken, and he was quite ready to pay the two shillings wanted then. But the repentance came too late, and ho was shunted off to the lockup. Yesterdny his Worship lectured John, and cautioned him against such obstinacy in the future, fining him LI and the 2s. excess fare. Sporting. —The running match for L 5 a-side, between Messrs. John Groves and George Montgomery, took place on Saturday afternoon in Mr. Hay T. Smith’s paddock. The weather was all that could be desired, and the attendance was very fair, fully one hundred persons having been on the ground. Both competitors stripped well, Groves looking particularly fit. The distance, as before mentioned, was one mile, which was five times round a course that had been pegged out. A capital start was affected, Groves (who had the inside running) taking the lead, which lie maintained throughout. Twice did Montgovery essay to pass his opponent, but without avail ; and finding his chance of first breasting the tape a poor one, he judiciously withdrew when about half-way round the cuurse the fifth time, thus allowing Groves to win as he liked. It is generally stated that the distance was accomplished in smin. 14secs., but we have heard doubts thrown on the accuracy of the record. Montgomery does not seem in any way disheartened by his defeat, which may be attributed to want of condition. Yery little money changed hands on the event. We should not be at all surprised to hear of another match at no distant date between Groves and Montgomery.

Drunk and Disorderly. —His Worship the Mayor disposed of three police cases on Saturday. A first offender escaped with a fine of os. Peter Kennedy, against whom nine previous convictions were recorded, was charged with the triple offence of being drunk and disorderly, resisting the arresting constable, and using obscene language. The prisoner admitted being drunk ; but declared he had not been in such a state for two years or more, and if his Worship would let him off, he “ would not taste drink again—no, not for five years.” Peter forfeited ten shillings for his too free indulgence in ardent spirits, and for resisting the constable and using intemperate language, resigned his liberty for fourteen days. Edward Jones, according to Constable

Beaumont, was parading the streets at half-past three this morning, in a very unhappy state of mind, consequent upon his being under the delusion that the had been robbed of what money he possessed. Jones evidently not being very able to take care of himself, Constable Beaumont escorted him to the lock-up, and gave him lodging till this morning. His Worship fined the delinquent 10s. or the usual alternative of forty-eight hours’ imprisonment.

A Good Servant.— A steel rail is on exhibition in France that has been in use 18 years, and over which 256,000 trains have passed. Pleuro. —The settlers at Waikato are greatly incensed at the slaughter of cattle suspected of pleuro-pneumonia, but which on examination in several cases, < have proved healthy. A Big Order. —Messrs. .Stephen and Sons, one of the principal shipbuilding firms on the Clyde, have received an order from an Italian house for ton steamships, each of 3,000 tons burden. Jewel Robbert —The Crown Princess of Denmark was robbed during her recent journey to England of ornaments worth 60,000 or 70,000 crowns. A sailor named Weiss on board the Skoldmon had been detected as the culprit. He stole the articles from the saloon in which the Princess, like the other passengers, had left her property.

Sly Grog Selling. - A man named Charles Boyce was fined L2O and L 5 costs at the Waimate R. M. Court on Thursday, for selling spirituous liquors in an unlicensed house.

Volunteering at Home. —The official return of the British Volunteer force for the past year show the total number of men enrolled has risen from 203,201 in 1868 to 206,250, while the “ efficients” have increased from 194,191 to 197,485. A Costly Funeral. —Thirty thousand pounds is no mean sum to spend on a funeral, yet this is said to have been actually expended on the obsequies of the Maharrjah Bardwan. The greater portion of the three lakhs was given away in charity.

A Funeral Sensation. —A sensation occurred at the funeral of Bliss Ada Bruin, daughter of Councillor Bruin, at Leceister. Just as the procession left the chapel in the cemetery, Mr. Joseph Blockley one of the bearers, dropped down dead. Miss Bruin was drowned while skating on the ice.

“Out of the Fryingpan,” Ac. —Two years ago the farmers in Hancock County, Kentucky, -I posted ” their lands so as to prevent sportsmen shooting upon them. In the interval, squirrels have so multiplied, that a large part of tl« co n crops in the country have been destroyed.

John Bright on Religious Education. —John Bright, speaking at Birmingham, contrasted the eight generations educated in accordance with Puritan traditions in America with the same generations in England, where they had been scaudously neglected, and allowed to grow up without State help towards knowledge.

The Civil Service Commission.—A telegram from Auckland of May 8 says : —The Civil Service Commission have examined the heads of all important departments, and leave for Nelson on Tuesday by the Hanea. They will remain at Nelson until the following Monday, then they go to Blenheim, where they remain three days, and then proceed to Wellington.

A Rich Man. —Mr. J. B. Watson, the Sandhurst millowner, made his fortune out of the Kent claim, Garden Gully. For several years he kept twelve batteries going on his own quartz, and got so much gold that the small difference between the mint and bank prices enabled him to net thousands by selling direct to Government. He has L 500,000 invested in Melbourne property, and has large interests in Sydney, where he has a brother. He has seven unmarried daughters. A Queer Result. — One of the most remarkable cases of restoration to speech on record is from Huntsvilla, Georgia. A Mrs. Martin had been partially paralysed for nearly a year, and had lost the power of speech. One day she accidentally struck a loaded revolver lying upon the table in such a way that the ball was discharged into the knee of her paralysed leg. A severe wound was produced ; but, strange to say, the woman began to talk, and has been able to do so ever since.

Let Off. —The tendency of colonial juries is to let offenders 6ff, but here is a sample of an English j ury which appears to have erred quite as much the other way. Justice Maule once addressed a prisoner thus ;—“ Prisoner at the bar, your counsel thinks you innocent ; the counsel for the prosecution thinks you innocent; I think you innocent; but a jury of your country, in the exercise of such common sense as they possess, which does not seem to be much, have found you ‘guilty,’ and it remains that I should pass upon you the sentence of the law. That sentence is that you be kept in imprisonment for one day ; and as that day was yesterday, you may now go about your business.”

Bare Hoof v. Shoe. —Some time since the London Christian Union called attention to the fact that an experienced farrier of England reported that horses did better without than with shoes. A writer in the London Times has been trying the experiment, and thus reports : —“ When my pony’s shoes were worn out, I had them removed, and gave him a month’s rest at grass, with an occasional drive of a mile or two on the high-road, while his hoofs were hardening. The result at first seemed doubtful. The hoof was a thin shell, and kept chipping away until it had worked down beyond the holes of the nails by which the shoes had been fastened After this the hoof grew thick and hard, quite unlike what it had been before. I now put the pony to full work, and he stands it well. He is more sure-footed ; his tread is almost noiseless ; his hoofs are in no danger from the rough hands of the farrier ; and the change altogether has been a clear gain without anything to set-off against it. My pony, I may add, was between four and five years old—rising four, I fancy, is the correct phrase. He had been regularly shod up to the present year.”

Leap-year in San Francisco.— “ Silverpen,” writing to the Herald, says: ■ —This being leap-year the ladies of Sun Francisco have the blessed privilege of doing exactly as they think fit with the other sex. Should a lady propose this year, as is the regulation, and the gentleman declines the honor, he sends her a scarlet petticoat as a sop for her disappointment. Just think of it, a red petticoat in lieu of a live husband. Then, the ladies give parties to which they invite gentlemen only, calling for their respective beaux in a carriage, filling their programmes, and attending to them just as they are used to be waited on. The rules of the leap-year ball are that “ each lady shall consider herself a gentleman for that night, attend to their partners, protecting them from draughts, fanning them, taking them across the floor,” etc., and these rules are punted on the programmes. No gentleman dare to cross the floor without an escort. I have seen some funny scenes at these gatherings. For instance, some poor man, who had been invited by a girl who only gave him one dance, has been chained to his seat for the rest of the night, no one taking the least notice of him, until the poor wretch has begged some passing fairy to take him to the cloak room, when he has thankfully escaped, with a suppressed blessing (?) levied on all leap-year balls. Which World ?—The following story comes from Auckland -On Thursday two Chinamen honored a British magistrate so far as to request him to arbitrate on a matter in dispute. Thomas Quoy, an intelligent young Mongolian, who speaks very good English, consented to act as interpreter, and was sworn upon the Bible. One of the learned counsel engaged in the case took exception to this proceeding, on the ground that there was no proof that Quoy was a believer in Christianity. His Worship put the quietus on that objection by pointing out that the interpreter rejoiced in the Christian name of Thomas. The man of law, however, proclaimed himself still as great a doubter as Thomas Didymus. Quoy was then interrogated as to his belief. He said that if he did what was wrong, all sorts of evil would befall him. “ But in this world or the next 1" inquired the magistrate. “In this world : I know of no other,” answered the Chinaman. The countenance of the irrepressible objecting lawyer brightened up ; it was evident that he was sure he had scored a point. But again he was doomed to disappointment. Mr. Laishley carried the day by remarking he was convinced that if the same question were put to half the educated men in England, no satisfactory answer would be obtained “ that they would not admit their belief in a huge furnace of fire and brimstone awaiting the arrival of every human being when he shuffled off this mortal coil.” Finally, the services of Mr. Thomas Quoy were thankfully accepted by all parties concerned,

Body Found.— The body of a man belonging to H.M.S. Cormorant has been found floating in Auckland harbor. Ho has been missing some time, and was supposed to have deserted. Totara.— Some totara telegraph poles that had been in the ground in the .North Island for over ten years, when lifted last week showed not a sign of decay, but were as fresh and sound as when put in.

The Auckland Smuggling Case. —Mrs. Sarah Bostock, who was fined LIOO for breach of the Customs’ Regulations, was unable to pay the fine, and was removed to Mount Eden Gaol to undergo the alternative of six weeks’ imprisonment.

Government Aid. The length to which some people go in depending upon the Government of the day to do e', erything is well illustrated by the following story, which comes from Victoria: —A lecturer on surgery at the Melbourne University, whilst lately summing up the results of the season’s lectures, is said to have deplored the scarcity of dead bodies. “But now,” he added, “as there has been a change of Ministry, we may hope for better things !” A poor compliment, indeed, to Mr. Service. An Audience. —The correspondent at Inglewood of the Taranaki Herald goes into figures over the audience that listened recently to Colonel Trimble, M.H.R. His statistics are as follows :—There were present about 150 men, 10 bull-dogs, 5 cattle dogs, and 200 fleas, the latter getting admitted in a surreptitious kind of way, concealed in the coats of the dogs, and, as soon as admitted, quitting thoss animals and distributing themselves amongst the assembly.

Polite Literature. The Wanganui Herald, the Hon. John Ballance’s paper, says of Major Willis, whose seat for Rangitikei is now under contest, that his course of labor in the House would not have taxed the strength of a “diabetic” patient. The Chronicle, published in Wanganui, gives the credit of the very refined expression to the Hon. John, and adds that it is the custom of the said Hon. John to unmistakeably point out the opponent he assails in his columns, and then bespatter him with the filth of a spiteful and illiterate Yahoo.

Native Affairs. —People are accustomed to the alarmist telegrams of the Lyttelton Times penny-a-line at “ the front,” and won’t feel very much shaken when they read his last telegram : —There is noting new on the Plains. The Constabulary having abandoned the road that ended in the swamp, and advanced by the beach track, are now engaged pushing forward with a dray track. As they advance the natives continue to occupy the land the rear and build whares. The local Government organs say that the nest few days will test the issue of peace or war. Mr. Bryce has said that any rebellion can be stamped out in three weeks.

Who’d Have Thought It.— Our big brother at the Cathedral city appears to transgress the rules of newspaper etiquette with the same impunity as other journals of the colony who do not claim to occupy such an exalted position as the journal in question. The Wellington Evening Post devotes the following local for the benefit of the Lyttelton Times : —“ There has been rather a paucity of nows in the South lately, and the Lyttelton Times has been driven to quoting largely from the Wellington journals principally the Evening Post. No one can of course object to this, but our contemporary might have the honesty to acknowledge the source from which it gets its information. In one issue recently, no fewer than three extracts were thus taken from us without acknowledgment, and on the Monday the Times cooly appropriated a sub-leader on the loss of the Yingorla. We certainly expected better things from a paper of the standing of the Lyttelton Times.”

A Female Fight in San Francisco. —Miss Wise and Miss Downing are two young women who unhappily loved one man, by name Mr. Young. The rivalry led to frequent ebulitions of anger and jealousy between the two, who even came to blows in the presence of the favoured swain. He, it appears, did not fully realise which he was the most partial to, but temporising, ho convinced each that she alone enslaved his heart. One evening in a ball room, while dancing with Miss Wise, Miss Downing walked up to the couple and insisted upon her rival giving up her partner ; this Miss Wise refused to do, whereupon Miss Downing shrieked and fell in a lit on the floor. The next day Miss Downing wrote and asked Miss Wise to visit her, which the latter did, and upon entering the house Miss Downing took up a club and flew upon her rival, who, retreating to the yard, picked up a pitchfork, and returned the salute. Mows on the head and shoulders from the club, and gashes on the hands and breast from the pitchfork, followed with terrible rapidity, until the two belligerents fell insensible. So they were found and picked up, but it is feared that neither will recover. Each calls for the delinquent Young, who has wisely made himself scarce in the vicinity, and left for parts unknown. The whole neighbourhood is excited over the affair. How Charity is Dispensed. —There is reason to fear, from what appears in the Wellington press, that the benevolent institution of, that city is, by its indiscreet system of relief, creating as well as relieving pauperism. One member of the committee has got so disgusted at last at the misuse of public money on unworthy objects of charity that he ceased to attend its sittings, and sent a note explaining his reasons. In the first case he mentions a Mrs. H , who was living in adultery, yet was continuing to receive rations, rent, and meanwhile living an immoral life. Another case was that of a woman in whose apartments, on being visited, were found odours of spirits, which were satisfactorily accounted for owing to the doctor having -ordered her a diet of biscuits steeped in brandy !” A third case was that of a notorious loafer getting rations for self and family. The rations were at last stopped when the woman tried to got jams, etc., in lieu of bread and beef. In a fourth case, a woman was receiving help while her daughter was receiving music lessons. Another instance adduced was that of a professional prostitute being helped until the police interfered. He concludes his letter thus :—“ I am constanlty told that unworthy persons are being helped, and in the face of the growing demands on the City Treasurer made by the benevolent committee, I fear nothing but the criticism of the press will check the growing evil.” If the instances given above are a fair sample of the distribution of charity at Wellington, it is not to be wondered at that LIOO a-week is needed to relieve the “distressed. ”

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Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 98, 11 May 1880

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