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Horticultural Society. —The annual meeting of the Horticultural Society will he held at Mr. Ansteo’s, Tancred street, on Tuesday evening next.

The Raphael Company. —We are informed that Signor Raphael and his talented family intend giving an entertainment in the Town Hall at an early date.

‘ ‘ Walking Extraordinary. ” —Young Glceson, a ped. of some note, is to essay the task ot walking 13 miles in two hours in the Town Hall, Ashburton, this evening. He commences his “journey ” at eight sharp. O.Y.G.—The following appointments in the O.Y.C. arc gazetted James Wilkin, to be lieutenant; and E. W Millet, and J. Stanley Bruce to be sub-lieutenants.' A contingent at Mount Somers and Alford Forest is spoken of.

A New Headpiece.— The C.Y.O. members are no longer to put up with the simple forage cap they wear as a part of their uniform. At a meeting in Christchurch on Thursday it was decided to obtain helmets, of a design to be obtained

by a Committee. Fire. —The weatherboard building used by Mr. Lancaster, for smoking meat, was burned down to-day, destroying .about 3001 b. weight of pork, the property of Air. T. Quill, which had been sent there for curing purposes. It is supposed that the heat was too intense, and that through this cause the woodwork had become ignited.

Reduction of Coursing Licenses. — After a discussion on a letter received from the Hon. Secretary to the Canterbury Coursing Club, asking that the license fee for coursing should lie reduced this season to 55., the Acclimatisation Council at Thursday’s meeting decided to charge a fee of 10s. for the first dog, and ss. for every other dog the bona fide property of one owner.

The Library. —From the number of rer.ders who take advantage of the read-ing-room in connection with the Public Library, we should say the institution is a remarkably popular one, and it is a pity that it should be neglected. Wo note that the library is no longer to be left under the reproach of causing no interest amongst the members, but that a meeting subscribers is to be held on the 13th of May next. Doubtless those who have been agitating reform will attend, and aid in the taking of forward steps, so that any little grievances now existing may be put square. Serious Accident. —Yesterday afternoon, about three o’clock, the young son of Mr. Clark, storekeeper, East Street, while running across the road opposite his father’s shop, and while looking over his shoulder at something behind, ran right under the feet of a passing horse that was drawing a dog-cart. The poor little fellow was knocked down and trod on by the horse, receiving a deep cut on the back of the head. Sir. T. Quill picked up the child, and had him driven to Dr. Ross’s, where his wounds were dressed. The wounds are severe, the skull being slightly fractured, but the doctor thinks the child will recover.

Powerful Lungs. —During the case of Edmiston, Gundry and Co. v. G. Ireland, at the Court yesterday, all the witnesses were ordered out of Court at the request of Mr. Branson, counsel for the defence. During the cross-examination of Mr. Bullock, the talk of both witnesses and counsel grew somewhat animated, the voice of Mr. Branson rising above the tumult with its usual clearness, upon which Mr. O’Reilly quietly drew the attention of the Bench to the fact that it was useless to order the witnesses out of hearing, when it was an impossibilty for them to do so ; a graceful compliment to the strength of Mr. Branson’s lungs, and one which ho, with equal grace, acknowledged.

Charge of Assault. —An old man named Cooper was brought before Mr. Guinness on Thursday afternoon, charged with assaulting his wife and threatening to take her life. The complainant stated she was in bodily fear of her husband, who was frequently intoxicated, and while in that state his conduct to her was very violent. Two witnesses gave evidence to the unsteady habits of the accused, and his Worship fined Cooper 10s. for the assault, or twenty-four hours’ imprisonment, and also bound him over to keep the peace towards his wife for six months, himself in a bond of L3O, and two sureties of Ll 5 each, or failing to find sureties, to be sentenced to six month's imprisonment ; the accused to be released if during that term the necessary bonds were entered into. Ashburton County Steeplechases.— A meeting of the committee of the Ashburton Steeplechases was held yesterday afternoon, at Quill’s Hotel. Present — Messrs. C. C. Fooks (Chairman), E. G. Crisp, E. F. Wright, Lawson, Grant, and Wilkie. It was resolved that the rule respecting district horses and owners should bo altered, so as to read as follows: —“ A district horse shall mean a horse commonly resident in the County since March Ist, 1880, and the buna fide property of the owner ; and ‘ owner ’ shall mean a person or persons commonly resident in the County of Ashburton not less than six months previous to this meeting. ” A committee was then appointed to inspect a suitable course on which to hold the races. The question of making a permanent steeplechase course on the present racecourse was discussed, and the matter referred to the ground committee to report on Tuesday next.

The “Lean-to” Case Appeal. —At the sitting of the Supremo Court in Christchurch on Thursday the appeal case —Patterson v. Pratt—against the decision of Mr. Guinness in the recent “ lean-to ” affair was heard. It will he remembered that Mr. Guinness sentenced Patterson to three months’ imprisonment on a charge of being illegally on the premisses of Mr. W. H. Barrett. The statement of the counsel for the appellant showed that the latter had gone to Barrett’s house, thinking it to bo another house, and, upon finding his mistake, had gone hack to his cart in the road, where he was arrested. He had not been further than Barrett’s verandah. Mr. Harper, instructed by Messrs. Branson and Purnell, appeared for Patterson, and Mr. Joynt appeared for the respondent. Mr. Joynt argued that it would be sufficient to show that a trespasser had no reasonable excuse ; it was not necessary to show that he was there for an illegal purpose. The appellant had not at once gone away, hut persisted for some minutes in remaining. He confessed that he did not think there was sufficient to warrant imprisonment for three months. His Honor, Judge Johnston, said the conviction was, as far as he knew the facts, monstrous, and quashed it.

The State op Life. —Mr. T. Taylor, baker, announces that hia bread is now sold at Cd. per quartern loaf.

The Licensing Court. —The announcement of the Licensing Court’s sittings for the Ashburton, Rakaia, and Mount Somers district on the Ist of June has been made. Jameson v. Field. —ln the case of Jameson v. Field, (an action to recover the price of some barley supplied by plaintiff to defendant, and which was decided in plaintiff’s favor), heard at the R. M. Court here some time ago, action has been taken in the Supremo Court, and on Thursday, Mr. Harper moved for a rule nisi, calling upon Frank Guinness, Resident Magistrate for Ashburton, to show cause why a mandamus should not issue directing him to issue a warrant of distress in the case of Jameson v. Field. Rule granted as prayed. Foreign Missions —On Thursday ovon* ing the annual missionary meeting of the Wesleyan Church was hold. There were about 50 members present, and Mr. J. 10. Buchanan was chairman, and introduced the subject of Foreign Missions. The Rev. Mr. Koall give an interesting sketch of the mission work of the Wesleyan Church. He said the Methodist Church had from its origin been characterised by amissionary spirit, its missions’ exhibited its true life, and it was very interesting to glance at that part of Methodist history. Ho gave a rapid sketch of the introduction of Methodism in various parts of the world, and of the formation of its missions, including Ireland, America, the Channel Islands, as the first step on the continent of Europe ; the West Indies, Africa, India, ahd Australasia. JpA Coke (appropriately slyled the father ( of Methodist Missions), accomplished a wonderful work. Then the British Conference in the year 1799, began to foster the mission cause, appointing a committee, ordering an annual collection for mission purposes, forming mission districts and recommending the inauguration of societies, until all preceding means culminated in the formation of the General Wesleyan Mission Society in London in the year 1818. Mr. Keall then gave some statistics of mission work in the South Sea Islands. The Rev. Mr. Richardson, chairman of the district traced the history of missionary enterprise in the South Sea . The Rev. S. Lee, ho said, was the first missionary sent to these parts, but the- main portion of the work had been done by lay agency. .. It bad been carried on with spirit until the recent depression crippled the means of the Homo Mission Committee, who now sought aid from Methodists in the South. At the close of the meeting a collection was taken up, which, added to.a collection made a few Sundays ago, made a total of £5. :

A Find. —A beautiful stone tomahawk has been found near Oeo by the roadmaking party. Good Yield. —Mr. John Findlay, of the North Taieri, has threshed out a small paddock of oats, which yielded at the rate of 100 bushels to the acre, and another twenty acre paddock of Tuscan wheat yielded 08 bushels to the acre.

A Provident Landlord. —An hotelkeeper has the following placard in a conspicuous part of his house, up North : “I may entertain angels unawares, but they must have baggage, or pay in advance, to meet the rules of the house.” Sea Coast Light. —The Government have recently imported from Messrs. Chance, Bros, and Co., lighthouse engineers, Birmingham, a number of lamps intended for sea coast lights in positions which do not warrantsthe erection of lighthouses. Torpedoes for New Zealand. —The European Mail understands that the Agent-General of New Zealand has been directed to make arrangements for the despatch of torpedo boats to the colony, for the service of a torpedo corps which is being added to the colonial defence forces. A Civilised Maori.— Yet another instance of the advancing civilisation of the Maori! From the Marunvatn Herald we learn that Hakaraia te Whenua (Bevan) has filed his schedule. Pie estimates his debts at LSOO, and his assets at L 0 Os. Od. Hakaraia has been working as a contractor for the County Council on the Otaki-Fox-ton road.

Serve The:,i Right. —The Brace Herald hears that notice has been received from head quarters to the effect that an amount of ss. sd. will be deducted from the capitation allowance of all volunteer companies who last year went to take part in the Invercargill review, for damage done to railway carriage windows during the trip. Peculiar Accident.— A young lady residing in Arthur street, Wellington, was working a sewing machine, when the needle snapped and the point penetrated the lower eyelid, rendering her for a time insensible. A 'doctor was sent for, but was unable at the time to discover the steel, which had been deeply buried in the flesh.

Mr. Joseph Maliks, the j English Templar. —At the annual session of the Grand Lodge of South Australia, I. O.G.T. (English order), held at Adelaide on the 9th March last, a sum of LBO was voted towards paying the expenses of Mr. Joseph Matins, the celebrated secessionist, to enable him to visit the colonies. Mr. Matins is an able lecturer, and was one of the many enlightened representatives, who left the American order in consequence of their declining to recognise the equal rights of the negro as members of the order.

A Curositv. —The Wellington Post say’s :—We were y r estcrday shown a curiosity in the way of penmanship, the work of William Richard Holmes, son of Mr. Holmes, of the Terrace School. What we refer to is the Lord’s Prayer written in ten languages within as many circles, each the size of a threepenny piece. The writing is very clear, and can be read without difficulty by tho naked eye. The languages are English, Latin, Portuguese, Belgian, Swedish, Italian, Maltese, Spanish, and Maori.

A New Bishopric for North China.— An anonymous donor has offered the sum of LIO,OOO as the nucleus of an endowment fund for a new bishopric in North China. The Archbishop of Canterbury has accepted the offer and approved the proposed new see, which is to be regarded as a missionary, and not a territorial one. In consequence of the expense of the necessaries of life and travelling, it has been decided that the minimum capital for endowment shall be L 13,000, and to the offer of LIO,OOO the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge and the Colonial Bishoprics Fund will each probably add LIOOO. The Primate will have the selection of the first Bishop, and it is anticipated that an appointment will soon be made. A Maori Present.— A considerable number of natives and a few Europeans were present on Monday at Putiki at the opening out of the parcels containing the two hundred Maori mats which the Wanga’nui tribe are about to give to the East Coast Chief Renata, as an acknowledgment of his liberality in sending them a flock of two thousand sheep. Near the Runanga house a long row of light rails had been erected, and at about two o’clock in the afternoon the Maoris commenced the work of unpacking, each mat as it was taken out being opened and thrown across the rail. It took some time before the whole -were displayed. The mats are of all sorts and sizes, of excellent workmanship, and many of them very beautiful. The material employed is flax, except some of the fringes and other ornamentations, in which wool is rather extensively used,

Hawks’ and Shags’ Heads.— ln consequence of the increasing number of hawks in the district, the Council of the Acclimatisation Society have determined again to offer Gd. each for hawks’ heads and Is. per head for black shags, delivered at the gardens.

Aniseed Valley Copper Mine. —The Nelson Colonist says :—Notwithstanding the fact that operations at this mine during the past week have not been progressing so rapidly as the shareholders could have desired, the work done shows the lode to be widening and the prospects continue of the brightest. At a meeting of tie directors held last evening tenders were accepted for sinking a further distance of 20ft., and when this work is done the mine will be thoroughly proved. Cetewayo on his Knees. — Cetewayo, in a message to the Queen, dated Oct. 28, wrote :—“ Cetewayo bogs permission to be allowed to send his humble respects to the Queen. He is staying here awaiting the Queen’s pleasure, and will willingly and cheerfully live wherever the Quern decides. At the same time he is living in hopes that at some future time he may bo pardoned. Ho feels greatly honore’d that his portrait is going to the Queen, whom he has always looked upon as a mother, and still regards in that light.” Stack Fire.— On Thursday morning early six stacks of wheat, belonging to the Bank of New South Wales, were totally destroyed by fire. The wheat was grown in one of the paddocks lately occupied by Mr. J. J. Loe, at Lecston, but now held by the Bank of New South Wales, and was the product of 42 acres, estimated to yield 40 bushels to the acre. The fire was diseovei’ed shortly after 4a. in. The whole six stacks were then in flames, and there is no doubt must have been the act of an incendiary. The stacks were insured in the Norwich Union for L 250, but this will not cover the loss.

Rowdy Maoris. — A new and very expeditions way of solving a native difficulty is reported from Manawatu. It appears that some strangers came to the Groua River, over which they wished to cross, but found their passages barred by the Maoris, who prevented them from doing so. Some altercation ensued, but as the natives would not give way, the travellers determined to force their passage, and for that purpose freely used their stockwhips, the result being that they accomplished their end. The Mauaicatu Times highly approves the remedy, and adds that if the habit of dealing satisfaction out to the natives, when such occurrences take place, were more common, there would be a considerable fall-ing-off of that obstructivencss now so rampant with the Maoris.

Pb.bsbsc.l3 oe Mind. ■ —■ Presence of mind had its reward on Saturday in saving a woman from being severely, if not fatally, burned. The News says : “ The wife of a resident in Invercargill was pursuing the ordinary avocations in the way of cooking, when her outer dress caught fire, and from the nature of the material, she was rapidly enveloped in flames. Quick as 1 bought another woman who was fortunately present threw tier arms ’round the burning female, while her sister, with equal rapidity, snatched up a blanket and enveloped her in it. This quickly extinguished the flames, and, on the covering being removed, it was found that, though the dress was completely destroyed, no injury whatever had been sustained. To this the habit of wearing flannel underclothing no doubt also contributed.” The Biter Bit. —The biter is sometimes bit, as the following true story will prove : A lady with more beauty than morals was allowed by a notorious Westend dressmaker to run up a bill to the tune of LllOO. One fine day the beauty was offered a present of LSOO by one of the numerous greenhorns who have existed from time immemorial. A mode of settling her long standing account at once suggested itself to the fert'le mind of the lady. Hurrying off to the module, she informed her that a gentleman was coming that day to pay LSOO on account, but that she must write on the receipt ‘ ‘ Paid in full,” as the gentleman thought ho was paying the whole bill, and might otherwise refuse to pay anything. The bait took, and a receipt was duly given as requested. The following day the dressmaker received a polite message from the lady to say she intended to transfer her patronage to another shop.

Bad Maori. —The Waimata Times remarks ; —ln the interests of philology we protest against the wholesale corruption of Maori nomenclature which is perpetrated add perpetuated in the naming of railway stations by the use of pseudo-Maori words, which are as offensive to the eye and car of all lovers of the native race as is pigeon-English or modern slang to a cultured Englishman. The latest instance is a section of the Otautau-Nightcaps railway, which is dubbed the “ Waicola. ” Now, as there is neither “c ” nor “I” in the Maori alphabet, the word is manifestly an outrage. Curiously enough, in the similarity of the error, the railway station of Waihola, as also the lake, is incorrectly named ; so also is “ Kartigi ” (there is no “g” as an undivided letter in Maori), and we could give hosts of other instances of incorrect orthography. It is surely a pity that some one in authority docs not see to it that this vandalism is put a stop to.

A Mixed Marriage. —The following paragraph may interest some of our lady readers. An English paper says that Lady Granard and Lady Adelaide Forbes went over from Dublin to England to purchase Lady Adelaide’s trousseau, preparatory to her marriage to Lord Maurice Fitzgerald, second son of the Duke of LoinsteiC The wedding was fixed to take place on April sth, but in consequence of Puncliestown Races, which came off that week, lias been postponed till the 13th. Lady Adelaide Forbes inherits a large fortune in right of -her mother, who died some years ago. This is one of the mixed marriages which cause so much discussion and difference of opinion in families, Lady Adelaide Forbes being a Roman Catholic, and Lord Maurice Fitzgerald belonging to a strict Protestant family. The Duke and Duchess of Leinster have expressed their resolution not to attend the marriage ceremony, as the priests have refused to allow any Protestant prayers to be introduced into the service. All the children who may be born of this marriage will be brought up Roman Catholics—this beingnow the strict rule of that Church. New Zealand Emigration to the Transvaal.— On the subject of the inclination of many New Zealand residents at the present moment to look towards the Transvaal as a field for their enterprise, the North■ Otago Times say s :—A few days ago it was telegraphed that about UO able bodied men had applied for passages in a vessel leaving Timaru for Cape Town. This is only a slight indication of -the attention which the Transvaal has been absorbing since the British Government annexed it. We believe that a gentleman in Oamaru has written for full information concerning the Transvaal as a suitable field for persons of small means, and this information has been asked at the request of several who desire to change their abode to a portion of the earth where there is a greater scope for enterprise than exists in New Zealand at the present time. Of course a new country is sure to offer this, at least for a while ; but it remains to be seen whether the Transvaal is such a country. The accounts from it are certainly glowing —that is, in regard to its climate and resources, but the Boer population is not yet inclined to accept peacefully the conditions imposed on them by the annexation. It is said that the Transvaal is as large as France, and at the present time the white population is extremely sparse—in fact, it comprises only a handful of people.

Volcanic. —The “eruption” at the Sugar Loaves has not in any way abated. Steam is still emitted from the fissure and other places, and the smell of sulphur is perceived. Sin Henry Havelock. —Sir Henry Havelock has been left half a million by his father’s cousin, on condition of changing his name to Allen. Sir Henry, having accepted the bequest, is obtaining a royal licence to assume the name of BavelockAllcn. Sir Henry Havelock served for sometime in New Zealand under General Sir Duncan Cameron, who commanded tiro Imperial and Colonial forces in one of the Maori wars.

The Berlin of To-Day. —A recentlywritten description of Berlin presents an appalling picture of the state of •; morality in that city*. The population is 1,000,000, and there is church accommodation for 7000 only. It often happens that preacher and organist depart because there is not a soul in the church to preach or play to. The Sunday is paid less attention to than in Paris. As to the morals of the people, they arc something incredibly lax, and in one chapter on the subject the author proves that the German capital is fast becoming a most depraved city. Drink is also a very prevalent vice, and almost every fourth house in the more populous districts either dispenses’ spirits or beer : and on Sundays the number of beergardens and places of resort in which drink can he obtained is prodigious. If the churches are empty these places are not. On the contrary, they are thronged to suffocation with men, women, and children.

■Queen Victoria. —Very remarkable changes have taken place during the forty-two years’ reign of Queen Victoria. She has outlived by several years every bishop and judge whom she found seated on the benches in England, Scotland, and Ireland when she ascended the throne. She has witnessed the' funeral of every Premier under her, except Lord Bcaconsfield and Mr. Gladstone. Not a single Cabinet member of her uncle and predecessor’s day now survives. Of the members of the Privy Council who sat in June, 1837, to administer to her the oath, only four survive. She has received the homage of four Archbishops of Canterbury, four Archbishops of York, and five Bishops—Chichester, Litchfield, and Durham successively. She has filled each of the Chief Justiceships twice at least; she has received the addresses of four Speakers of the House of Commons. She has entrusted tire Groat Seal of the Kingdom to no less than nine Lord Chancellors. Religious Denominations in the British Army. —The following statistics, showing the religious persuasions of noncommissioned officers and men in the British army, will doubtless be of interest to many at the present time. Allowing for defects in returns, there are, as nearly as can be ascertained, 100,000 men in the army who have declared themselves as belonging to one or other of the groat religious denominations. Of these 02,809 are returned as belonging to the Church of England, 7195 are Presbyterians, 3985 Wesleyans and other Protestants, and 20,872 arc returned as Roman Catholics. Thus, out of a total of 94,812 more than two-thirds claim to be adherents of the Established Church of the country. It will be seen that, taking the entire army, the Church of England element strongly preponderates. The Law of Murder. —A late number of the Solicitors’ Journal states that a quaint piece of criminal law was disinterred at the recent Maidstone Assizes. A man and his wife, after drinking heavily for eight days, throw themselves into a river, no doubt intending, as far as they wore capable of forming an intention, to commit suicide together. The husband, was drowned, but the wife escaped, and she was thereupon charged with the murder of her husband. Following authorities in the recent case, the Lord Chief Justice, in summing up, told the jury that they must take the law to be that if two persons agreed to commit self-murder and one of them survived, the survivor was guilty of murder. Happily, however, it was not necessary to put this doctrine into practical application, as the jury seem to have thought that the parties were not in a condition to form a definite intention to commit suicide, and consequently found tho woman not guilty. How Prizes are Given.— Writing of tho awards at the Sydney Exhibition, tho “ Vagabond,” in a letter to the Orens and Murray Advertiser , says : —ln real truth, this system of awards at the International Shows is a great farce. Take, for instance, an article we will call a toothpick. Tills is a necessary of civilisation, and the display of toothpicks .at the Exhibition has been a grand one. Hundreds of bundles by different manufacturers of different countries were sent in to that department of applied science to which toothpicks are said to belong. What would they do ? Try each pick I Select at random ? —to go through which would take a year. Besides, what suits one man’s teeth will not another’s. So, to solve the difficulty (the judges in this instance being honorable men, unamenable to palm-oil, an application of which has in many instances decided equally knotty points) each toothpick exhibitor received a “first prize.” This is a perfectly true tale.

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Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 94, 1 May 1880

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