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Westerfield Mill. —We learn that the Westerfield estate changed hands y'esterday, C. S. Howdon, Esq., Christchurch, being tire purchaser. A notice appears in our advertising columns respecting the mill.

The Coleridge Electoral Roll.— The office of the Registrar of Electors, Ashburton, and the Post-office, Sheffield, have been gazetted as the places at which the electoral roll of the Coleridge district shall be open for inspection.

Officiating Ministers under tee Marriage Act. —The following Ministers are announced as being authorised to soleminise marriage under The Marriage Act, 1854 : —Roman Catholic Church ; Rev. J. P. Cassidy ; Church of England : Rev. A. W. Hands and Rev. L. C. Brady ; Baptist Church : Rev. A. W. Webb. Bar Framed Bee Hives. —We had thought that 15s. per hive and 2d. each for frames was about the minnhnum price at which bar-framed bee hives could be produced, but a Thames saw-milling Company offer to fupply the Christchurch Beekeeping Association at a cheaper rate still, believing they can undersell Christchurch in its own market. Canterbury Cattle Board and Inspectors. His Excellency' has been pleased to appoint Messrs. Robert Wilkin, F. J. Kimbell, Charles Newton, J. T. Peacock, and John Studholme members of the local Cattle Board for the district of Canterbury', Mr. Robert Wilkin to be Chairman. A Cattle Inspector, with three deputies have also been appointed as follows : —lnspector—Philip Baker Boulton ; Dcputy'-Inspector Reginald Poster, R. T. Holderness, James Macdonald. The Express. —We didn’t hear of the incident referred to in the following paragraph from the Sydney Town and Country: —A.inan fell off the platform of one of the carriages of an express train in New Zealand last week. It was thought he was killed, but lie wasn’t. He was not hurt at all, but pursued the cxpioss train, and wasn’t far behind it at the next station. Falling off railway trains, though doubtless as easy' as “ falling off a log,” is not therefore recommended as profitable or even desirable physical exercise. It is apt to prove trying to the nerves

Season for Shooting Game. A Gazette, just to hand, contains a proclamation declaring the period within which imported game may be hunted, shot, taken, or killed, within the several districts of the colony. The part more particularly referring to Ashburton, intimates that the Ist to the 30th June is the season during w'hich cock-pheasants are at the sportsman’s disposal, and hares may be bunted (coursed) from the Ist May to the 31st July. It is, however, added that it is illegal to attempt to take or kill such game at any other time than between the hours of sunrise and sunset. The Chertsey Land Sale. —On Tuesday last, the well-known property of W. A. Brown, Esq., Chertsey, was submitted to public auction. Mr. John Matson officiated, giving a glowing description of this splendid property, referring more particularly to its close contiguity to the railway station. The land, as a block of 1100 acres, was passed in at L 7 10s. per acre, and the homestead section was passed in at L 9 10s. The sale of implements, machines, etc., being proceeded with, realised oidy ordinary rates. The stock was sold at a low average rate, and the sale on the whole, must have been a loss to the owner.

“Ashore and Afloat.” —The final performance of the drama “ Ashore and Afloat” was given in the Town Hall last night by tho Amateur Dramatic Club. There was a very 7 fair attendance of the public, and tho play went on with far greater smoothness than it did on either of the two former representations, and the several players appeared to be a good deal nearerto perfection in the texts of their various part. The winding np was somewhat altered to got rid of a scene for which the stage appliances were not suited, and the change was a marked improvement. We understand that towards the close of the present month, “Black Eyed Susan ” will be placed upon die boards by 7 tho local company.

What a Teacher Should he. — Inspector Lee, reporting on the Wellington district schools has the following to say regarding teachers ; “ How much depends on the character, disposition, education, and example of the teacher ' Every school differs in some respects from all other schools—the difference being mainly attributable to the individual character of the teacher. The position of the teacher, both in relation to his scholars, and in his social relation to the people amongst whom he labors, is veiy much of his own making, and depends for the most part on his own personal worth. If teachers fail in producing good results, it is not from idleness, but from want of judgment, want of training, or from sheer incapacity. Teachers are, however, to be mot with who have loose notions of their own, and think that such matters as excesses in their habits, and living beyond their means, arc to be thought nothing of, if they do their duty in their school. Parents who entrust their children at an impressionable time of life to the school teacher, in loco parentis, will naturally look for good example of life and manners in those who have the care of their offspring. The teacher, then, if he wishes to win the respect of his pupils and their parents, will be a bright and honest example, and, in all his acts an honorable man, sensible of his responsibilities, and mindful of his influence.”

South Australia’s Wheat. —The South Australian Register estimates the average yield of wheat at 11 bushels per acre, making a total yield of 16,300,000 bushels, of which 13,375,000 bushels, or 361,500 tons will bs available fop sale or expert,

Town Hall Fees. —At the entertainment which was given on Monday in the Primitive Methodist Church, one of the speakers, in his remarks on the Waiinatc Town Hall, remarked that they had been able to obtain that building for the moderate sum of LI per night. Had the promoters of the entertainment been able to procure the Ashburton Town Hall for anything near that amount they would have done so ; but the amount asked was L2 25., with cost of gas, and so any thought of holding the meeting there had to be abandoned. Perhaps it might be as well for the directors of the Town Hall to revise their scale of charges, with a view to reducing them, and thus inducing more business.

A Joke. —Some joker at Masterton recently telegraphed to . a Wellington paper that the Maori King, Tawhiao, had abdicated in favor of Sir George Grey ! O amabu Harbor.— The LIOO,OOO loan of the Oamarn Harbor Board having been successfully floated, another wall to the northward of the present one will be run out, and the harbor will be dredged to a depth sufficient to admit of the largest Home vessels ly'ing alongside the breakwater.

The Work of Destruction. —The slaughtering of cattle infected with pleuro-pneumonia is still going on in Auckland. Mr. Fantham’s pure-bred shorthorn bull, Lord Darlington, was killed on suspicion. The post mortem examination showed that the animal was suffering from tuberculosis.

A Rude Wakening. —A man went to sleep with his head on the lines of the Port Pirie Railway, S.A. A vigorous kick turned the current of his thoughts, and his body off the line at the same time, just before a train sought an interview. He said the boot was more emphatic than the circumstance warranted.

ik Warning. —The following advertisement appears in a Sydney paper : “ John Turner, native of Glasgow, who married Martha Riley, 17 y'ears of age, at Richmond, I give you notice that having for seven years made every effort to discover y'ou, I intend to get married again. —Martha Turner, Montefiores. ”

Who are the Imbibers I —Which is the drunken department of the Civil Service ? The A Tew Zealand Times says that all the empty beer bottles brought to light during the late shifting of the Government buildings “ wore found in the rooms of a single department, the gentlemen engaged in all the others being apparently water drinkers.” Death from D.T. —On a wharf in one of the cities of the North Island, a short time ago, a larrikin mosquito, after doing a buzz in and out of a crowd there congregated,’alighted for a moment on the

highly-colored nose of a Government official. The ill-fated insect presently fell down dead at the feet of its victim. On being picked up an examination was held, the verdict returned being—“ Died from delirium tremens. ”

Steel Firkiross. —A simple and effective way of polishing steel lire irons, is by rubbing them with sweet oil, and then vigorously applying building lime. Rust spots may be erased, by allowing the lime to remain on the irons a day or so, then rubbing briskly with oil and lime, a brilliant polish will be effected. Bronze fenders should be well brushed, to clear off every particle of dust, then with an ordinary paint brush, sweet oil applied. A Hang?,ian’s Wealth. —According to the Neio York Herald, Oalcraffc, the English hangman, died worth L 20,000. He was, say's the Herald, very sensitive, and was looked upon with reverence in the neighborhood in which he lived, and respect by his relatives. This is not surprising when wo consider he was worth L 20,000. It is only a wonder there were not more persons who, for the sake of notoriety, did not want the exalted hom-r of being “ strung up” by a hangman worth L 20,000.

Faggot Voxel This is how the Liberals in the old country' work the oracle. As a sst-off to 100 faggot voters created by' the Duke of Buccleugh, Lord Roseberry has, as if by a sudden touch of enchantment, thrown up 100 cottages near Edinburgh, on the Tyne side, to house 160 working men and add 160 to Liberal constituency. The work was pushed on in a most picturesque and energetic manner, four contractors taking each forty tenements, and a force of 500 masons, bricklayers, laborers, and so forth, relieving each other in relay's night and day.

Forgiving and Forgetting. —Prince Bismarck was once asked by Count Enzenberg, formerly Hessian envoy' at Paris, to write something in his album. The page on which he had to write contained the autographs of Guizot and Thiers. The former had written: “I have learnt in my long life two rules of prudence. The first is to forgive much ; the second is never to forget. ” Under this Thiers had said : “ A little forgetting would not detract from the sincerity of the forgiveness.” Prince Bismarck added : “As for me, I have learnt to forget much, and ask to bo forgiven much.”

Sudden Death at Dunedin. A woman named Esther Teague died very suddenly on Tuesday at Dunedin. She had been residing with a Mrs Atkinson at the corner of Cargill and Scotland streets, and, after partaking of lunch, went to her room to dross. Mrs. Atkinson not hearing her moving looked into the room about a quarter of an hour later, and found her lying dead on the floor. Dr. Murphy -was immediately sent for, and lie attributed death to heart disease. The deceased, who was about 40 years of age, had frequently complained of coldness and a pain in her side, but was not considered sufficiently unwell to render it necessary to summon a doctor.

Bottled Lightning. —A shocking story comes from Birmingham, which shows how careful people ought to be in using the electric light. It appears that at the Holte Theatre several designs are lighted by a number of electric lamps. A M. Bruno, one of the orcliostia, although warned not to do so, took hold of the brass connections when the lamps were not in use, and thus received the full force of the current generated by a powerful battery, which supplies all the lights in the buildings and grounds. He was unable to disengage himself, and pulled the wire down. When released he was insensible, and though restoratives were

applied, lie died in about half an hour. London gas is certainly bad enough, but it is better than what an irreverent young man called bottled lightning.

A Eailkoad that Really Pays. —The idea of a railway paying the cost of government if a novelty that could only occur in America. It is not yet an accomplished fact, but it is put forth in an American paper with all the gravity of possible realisation. The paper says :—“The debt of Illinois has been reduced to 800,000 dollars, and will be extinguished, it is claimed, within a year by the payment to the State of the dues of the Illinois Central Railroad. This railroad has proved a perfect Bonanza to the State. When the Bill for the creation of this road was before the Illinois Legislature, Senator Douglas affixed a provision by which, instead of paying taxes, it should pay in lieu thereof seven percent of its gross receipts every year. The sum received by the State from the railroad has been yearly increasing, and has gradually wiped out the State debt. When this is gone, as it will be within a year, it is thought that the road will yield a sufficient revenue to carry on the ordinary expenses of the Government, thus doing away with the necessity of levying any State taxes.” When shall we have a New Zealand railway to put by the side of this 1

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Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 93, 29 April 1880

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