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THE WATERTON DOG CASE.

To the Editor.

Sir, —In your paper of April 1,1 notice a letter signed “ Robert Anderson,” in which he attempts to correct some errors in the report of your contemporary on the case of Anderson v. Fleming, at the R.M. Court on the 23rd, with the view of making clear to the public the justice of his claim. Has he done so 1 He states his first claim was to rescue his dog. This statement I flatly deny. Instead of coming for his dog, he sent me a bill for LlO, with a summons pinned on to.'it. . , . . With regard to the great insult I gave to Mr. Anderson, I had not spoken to him previous to the case being heard, nor since that night. The next point involves a mathematical question, which I will leave with Mr. Anderson, taking it for granted that he has measured the distance between his house and mine. According to his showing, I stated the distance to be a mile and a-half, whereas I stated it to be three-quarters of a mile or a mile. But evidently Mr. Anderson is, like Paddy with his minutes, not particular about a handful of chains. Then Mr. Anderson takes exception to my witness. That witness is my wife and his own sister. If he were manly he would be ashamed to even attempt to fix an untruth upon his own sister. What my wife did say was that the night of the 4th March was as light as moonlight. If Mr. Anderson loves the truth so much as to stand or fall by it, in the first place, he ought to state it.—l am, <&c., William Ft .bmvc.

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THE WATERTON DOG CASE. Ashburton Guardian, 8 April 1880

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