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The Ashburton Guardian, COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & SPORTING RECORDER SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1880.

The Borough Council, since its birth, has been now and then discussing various schemes hy which a reliable supply of water could be obtained for the township, both for domestic and street flushing purposes. Many ideas have been promulgated—sonic remarkable for their simplicity, others for their extravagance, and others for their absurdity. But up to the present, the genius of none of them have been of any use to the burgesses. The scheme adopted by the Council, the cost of which is estimated to be covered by a loan of L 15,000, is not to be thought of just now, as the ratepayers would have to pay a rate equal to a very decent rental on their properties ; and judging from the objections raised hy the ratepayers against their valuations, when their responsibilities for taxes only amount to one shilling in the £ for ordinary rates, we are justified in assuming that a considerable difficulty would be experienced in extracting an extra eighteenpence in the £ from the pockets of the burgesses. That sum would certainly be required to meet the annual charges on the loan for the proposed works. It is evident, then, that for some time to come this scheme must be laid 011 the shelf, and we must necessarily put up with a less expensive, if not so perfect a water supply. That such can bo obtained at a cost within the means of the Borough is well known ; but the reason it has not been carried out before now is not quits so clear. The probability is that the Council were so wedded to their

adopted scheme that they did not care to descend from the altitude of a high pressure water supply which cost so much to initiate, to a practical but easily understood idea, which asserts its reliability and simplicity to anj tyro in engineering. It- is only too well known to most of our residents that when the river takes a notion to overflow its banks, a supply of considerable magnitude comes down at unwelcome times to flood grain stores, dwellings, Ac. At the last meeting of the Council some slight discussion took place as to the practicability of utilising this occasional overflow as a temporary supply for the town, with this difference that it should he constant as long as required, and not periodical and destructive. Mr. E. Saunders, one of the members of the Council, gave a brief outline of a method by which a stream could be brought into the side channels at a very small expense, and as ho possesses no insignificant practical knowledge in matters of this sort, and has given a considerable amount of his time towards obtaining information for and calculating the cost of the furtherance and dclopment of his scheme, his opinion on the m.vttcr will he a valuable one. His worship the Mayor has not been behindhand, and ho intends—so wc gather from his remarks at the last meeting of the Borough Council—to pin his faith to windmills as a source of supply. As wc know nothing of the details as yet, wc must wait until he lays his plans before the special meeting to be held on Monday next.

It is, at any rate, a matter of congratulation to know tliat this subject is being taken np in such a manner by the Municipal body, and it is to be regretted that the funds at their disposal are not as extensive as their wishes to make improvements. We must hope for some genius to propound a scheme at the special meeting, providing the necessary funds to carry out works by which the various water channels may be converted into something more wholesome than they are now.

The Dunedin Cup. —The time of Mata, the winner of the Dunedin cup, 3mm. 5G.| see., is the fastest on record.

Rakaia R. M. Court. Henceforth the R. M. Court at Rakaia will open at two o’clock, instead of the earlier hour.

Harvest Thanksgiving. Harvest thanksgiving services will take place in most of the Christchurch places of worship on Sunday.

The Grain Market. —Messrs. Fiiedlander Bros, announce to the farmers of the district that they are prepared to either purchase or make advances on grain, and as this firm have local conveniences, both for loading into trucks a ad storage in the township if necessary, they ought to pass a large quantity through their hands this season. Court Houses. —The various votes for Court Houses throughout the colony during the present financial jmar exceed L 50,000. Of this sum, buildings at Wellington absorbL2o,ooo ; Auckland, L 5000; Christchurch, LSOOO ; Oamaru, L3OOO ; Waimate, L4OOO ; Invercargill, L 4500 ; and Ashburton LSOO. The Upper Ashburton Assessment Court. —The valuation roll for the Upper Ashburton Road Board was adjudicated upon by Mr. F. Guinness yesterday, and about half-a-dozen objections were lodged. These were duly heard, and the roll, after being corrected in accordance with the result of the objections, was duly passed and signed.

Opening of the Methven Railway. The first train from Methven arrived at Rakaia ct 6.50 a. m. on Thursday, returning to Methven at 10.10, after the arrival of the express from Christchurch. A good many people availed themselves of the opportunity of a free trip to Methven and back on the opening of the line.

Wheat Stack Burnt. —On the return of the train from Methven on Thursday, word was brought that Mr. James Dent, of Winchmore, had just had one of his stacks of wheat, which the men had only just completed, entirely destroyed by fire. No further particulars were obtainable.

Timaru Gas Company. —At the annual general meeting of the shareholders of this company, held on Wednesday night, a very satisfactory report and balancesheet were read, and it was decided to declare a dividend at the rate of 15 per cent, on the past year’s business.

The Westland and Waimate. —Both these vessels are still in quarantine, as well as their passengers, who were landed at the quarantine stations, but cases of illness are rapidly decreasing, and no new cases have occurred. Big Trout. —Mr. Seahright, a Christchurch angler, took a 151 b trout from the Avon 011 Thursday, with a minnow bait. North Canterbury Races. —lt is proposed to postpone these races till Friday, April 2, to avoid their clashing with the Easter Monday Volunteer Review.

The Temperance Movement. The Rev. Matthew Burnett, tho temperance reformer, who is likely to visit New Zealand, in a letter giving an account of his recent farewell tour through Victoria, states that during the seven weeks over which it extended, ho administered the pledge to more than 1,000 persons.

Repartee. — Ti e oilier clay a friend remarked in a humorous way at the dinner table that his next neighbor but one had a very large mouth. The latter gentleman suffered his defeat with equanimity. After a short time speaker number one began to cough violently, saying that a fly had made his escape from his cup of tea, but had unfortunately gone down his throat. Speaker number two saw his opportunity and improved it by saying that the fly had made a sad mistake, for he was sure the poor creature thought it was going into the open air ! Number one stopped coughing. Sabbath Observance. —At a meeting of the Christchurch Sunday School Teachers’ Union on Thursday, th e following resolution was passed : —‘ ‘ That this meeting, feeling very anxious for the preservation of the sacredness of the Sabbath Day, do heartily agree with Mr. Councillor Lambert in his resolution before the Council to suppress Sunday trading, and hereby pledges itself to use all legitimate moans in its power to assist him or the City Council to obtain any enactment or law which will enable them more efficiently to secure the sacred observance of the Lord’s Da}'.” Apiarian Society. —A meeting of ladies and gentlemen interested in the formation of a Bee-keeping Institution, took place at the Congregational School, Manchester street, Christchurch, on Thursday. There was a good attendance, there being a number of ladies present. Dr. Irving was elected to the chair. The business of the meeting having been stated in a few words by the chairman, the meeting proceeded to the consideration of the rules, a set of which had been prepared for that purpose. The chairman said that he had received from persons resident in Ashburton andKaiapoi, communications indicative of the warm interest taken in the movement in the country districts, and suggesting that branch societies might be formed at the places named ; a letter to the same effect had been received from Dunedin. After some discussion it was resolved to alter the name of the Society, so that its operations might be extended, and call it the Canterbury Bee-keeping Association. The rules were then considered seriatim and at considerable length. A set of regulations suitable to the circumstances of the association having been passed, the election of officers and a committee was proceeded with. Dr. Irving was e’ectcd president, Canon Cotlerill vice president, Mr. F. Adams secretary, and Mr. J. P. Jameson consented to act”as treasurer pro tom. The following were appointed a general committee : —Mosdames C. W. Adams, F. Adams, Espinett, Manifold, and Miss Brown ; Messrs C. Hull, Bray, C. W. Adams, H. Purdie, Wheeler, G. Harris, W. Smith, Edwards, Dr. Campbell, and the Rev. G. Wilks. It was also resolved that the general committee should elect a sub-committee from their number to act as the executive. A vote of thanks was passed to the church authorities for the use of the building, and a vote of thanks to the chairman terminated the proceedings. Seeing a Man Home. —l picked Simmons up pretty near dead drunk, and took him home. When I got to his house, as I thought, I shook him a bit, and said, “ Hei-e you are.” “ Right,” said he, and gave a big bang at the knocker. Up went a window. ‘ Who’s there V’ screamed a woman. “I have brought the old man homo,” said I. “All right,” she cried, .and came to the door. She immediately seized hold of Simmons, and gave him such a shaking that his teeth seemed to rattle in his head. “ Who are you shaking of ]” says lie. “ Goodness gracious,” cried the woman, “ That is not my husband’s voice. ” I struck a match, and she found she had been shaking the wrong man. “ There,” said the woman furiously, “I’ve been sitting up here expecting my husband home drunk, and now I’ve wasted my strength on a stranger. ” “Don’t he live here?” said I. “No,” said the woman, “He don’t.” “ What made you knock ?” said I to Simmons. “ Knock,” said he,” “ You told mo to.” “ I thought you lived here,” said I. “Glad I don’t,” said he. I suppose he was thinking of the shaking he’d had. At last I found where he did live, and got him home. Mrs. Simmons was sitting up for him. As soon as ever we knocked, out she came. “Oh !” says she, “ you’re the wretch as makes my poor husband drunk, are you V’ and she caught me a slap across the face. I’ve never seen a drunken man heme since. — “Cope’s aTobacco Plant.”

Accountant in Bankruptcy. —Mr. J. E. Buchanan has been appointed by Judge Ward a certificated accountant in bankruptcy.

Prolific Yield. — A field of oats on Mrs. Janies Birnie’s farm, Kaiapoi Island, threshed out this week, returned the enormous yield of 93 bushels per acre nett.

SanFranciso Mail. —Tho Homo mail, via San Francisco will close this morning at 10.20 at the Ashburton Post Office. The mail will he due in London April 13. Important to Farmers. —Mr. Joseph Clark is prepared to purchase grain fir cash, or to make advances to farmers wishing to ship their produce, and with that object in view will attend to his constituents in Ashburton on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

The Rakaia Valuation List.—Thursday, the 11th March, has been fixed as the day for completion and inspection of the new valuation list of the district, and objections will require to bo sent in by the 29th of the same month. The Court to hear these objections will sit at two o’clock in the afternoon of the sth April.

The Remote Future of Westland.— The “Hokitika Evening Star” thuses : —“The selfishness, as displayed by the Christchurch Chamber of Commerce, and almost all the deputations, in Canterbury and Otago, who interviewed the Minister, is commendable. They have no hesitation in asking for the impossible. They know no one but themselves, until the tax gatherer comes round. Then they recollect that there are neighbors, and at once endeavor to saddle them with the heavier burdens, whether having received any benefits or not. Westland ! your prospects in the face of sleeping cars, tiger rugs, foot-warmers, and perhaps sleeping car maids, arc ve r y remote indeed. You may pay, which is a privilege you are allowed to enjoy, but you are doomed to tramp, and manuka scrub placed on mother earth is your sleeping car.

Digby’s Bridge. —The contractor fertile construction of the bridge near Digby’s made good progress until tho advent of harvest, when the carters struck for a substantial advance in the price of conveying the material from the railway station to the site of the bridge. In consequence of this rise in the value of haulage the contractor has for the present suspended operations, although the timber is now encumbering the railway station yard. All the piles are driven, about half the superstructure is completed, and in a very short time it is expected that the bridge will be open for tho limited amount of traffic expected to utilise the structure. A New Firm. —Messrs. Everett Bros., drapers, outfitters, &c., of Nelson and Christchurch, are about to open a branch of their establishment in the stores lately occupied by Hooper, Aitken, and Co., and at present used as an auction mart by Messrs. J. E. Buchanan and Co. The new firm intend opening for business on Saturday next, 6th March.

Civil Service Reductions. —Wo are informed on good authority that a Royal Commission will, at an early date, commence their investigations into the inner secrets of the multifarious departments and offices considered to be necessary for carrying on the affairs of the colony. Hie necessity for the enormous army of officials employed has been severely commented on, and has at last led to the appointment of a Coinmissicn of gentlemen who are to make a rigid scrutiny into the working of every department, with a view to weeding out the ornamental and retaining the useful portion of the great army of officialdom. The work before the Commission is a Herculean one, and will, if thoroughly and successfully carried out, deserve to he put on a parallel with the cleansing of the Augean stables.

Masonic. —At the regular meeting of the Thistle Lodge, S.C., on Thursday night Bro. T. Quill was elected W.M. in consequence of the removal of Bro. K. Hurst to Christchurch, At the meeting of tho Somerset Lodge last night it was proposed to celebrate the opening of the now Masonic Hall in Tancred street next month by a ball, and a committee was appointed to make the necessary arrangements.

Taken in. —ln Tasmania the other day, a merchant, in anticipating that the Colonial Treasurer’s statement would cause the duty on salt to he doubled, bought 200 tons to land. Imagine his disgust when he found the duty was reduced from 30s. to 20s. per ton. Several merchants made like mistakes regarding other articles of merchandise. Anti-Fat. —At a certain railway station the other day a contractor, who is trying to reduce his proportions by partaking of “anti-fat mixture,” complained that it cost him Bs. a week to keep his corpulency within bounds. “Hear that,” ejaculated a son of Erin. “In this country men are doing their best to keep down their fat; in mine they can’t get rid of their lean. Surely this must he a feme country for the working man ! ” Adventures of a Piano. —This story (which we clip from the “ South Canterbury Times”) ought to skin the eyes of a certain Town Hall Company wc know of. Some time ago an accomplished musician, whom we shall call Herr Thumper, finding business dull, raffled his instrument—a half grand—which, having undergone severe wear, was in a rather tuneless condition. As luck would have it, the lucky thrower was a prominent Philharmonist, ami this gentleman, believing thirty banknotes would be preferable to the musical notes of his acquisition, sold it for that sum to a firm of auctioneers and dealers. From the latter it found its way to an importing firm in New Zealand, whose name and stylo, to avoid unpleasantness, we will not mention. This occurred several months ago. Now for the sequel. Herr Thumper was travelling the other day with a musical company, when lie happened to call at a ■wayside township where the only place for entertainments is a Town Hall belonging to a public company. Besides the hall, a grand piano was hired, and Herr Thumper proceeded to examine it. “ Why,” said he, critically surveying his instrument, “ I’m bio wed if that isn’t my old half grand that I raffled at a few months ago.” “ Can’t be,” replied the hall-keeper, “that piano belongs to the Town Hall Company, and is a newly-imported instrument which they recently paid LISO to Messrs for.” “ that may he a newly-imported instrument of the company, but it can’t deny its identity. It’s the old half grand which I’ve hired and raffled, and played on till 1 was sick and tired of my life.’’--Herr Thumper is now on his travels, and the story of his piano is operating like an eye-opener on many a musical circle, where tlie tricks of trade have hitherto been unsuspected. A Difference. —Did you (says a writer iu a Home paper) ever notice the broad, comfortable, shady looking Leghorn hats in the milliners’ windows ! Jnst buy a woman one, and the first thing she will do will be to double up her dainty fist and punch a three-cornered dent on the right side; then she will pinch the front rim down and the hack rim up, and then stave in three or four more big dents at odd corners ; and, when it resembles in shape an old tin pap that has been a target for a stone-throwing match, she will remark upon tho “ elegance and grace ” of the affair. But just let a man jam in one side of his hat, and he will be proclaimed a wine-bibbing vagabond.

Use Plump Seed Wheat. —Wo have known • practical farmers to save their shrunken wheat for seed, after selling their plumper and more perfectly developed

and matured grain, because of the better price it would bring ; holding, also, that one hundred pounds of shrunken grain would seed more ground than one hundred pounds of plump grain. Possibly there may be no noticeallo deterioration in the product of a single season from inferior seed ; but that is to be doubted, and the practice is certainly contrary to the rules of good husbandry and the laws of nature, and should be discouraged by practice and sentiment of every fanning community.— “ Exchange. ” Besterday’s Court. —There was no Court yesterday.

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The Ashburton Guardian, COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & SPORTING RECORDER SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1880. Ashburton Guardian, Volume 1, Issue 67, 28 February 1880

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