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TERMINATION OF THE BASUTO WAR.

[By Telegraph.] The Orient steamer brings news of the conclusion of the Basuto war by the rapture of Moirosio’s stronghold, and the death of the Basuto chief. After shelling the mountain three days and nights, on Nov. 19ih the British force, under Colonel Ilayb.y, assaulted it from five different positions. The enemy, not being taken by surprise, kept up a brisk fire, and rolled stones on the besiegers. The native allies of the British, carrying scaling ladders, dropped them at the sound of the first shot. The riflemen picked up the ladders, and one 23 feet in length being placed against the sloping rock the first man to mount was Lieutenant Springer, at whom thoßasutos fired point blank. Ho had a narrow escape, one bullet passing through Ids hat, and striking the rock close to him. Ho was quickly joined by other riflemen, and they held the position until others came up. Once' on the top the men fixed bayonets, and charged in lino right across the mountain, carrying all before them. For about ton minutes some severe bayonet work went on, both inside and on top: Moirusi was shot in the breast in the assault, and a bullet struck him in the neck. After the assault he was found dead in a cave, into which he had crawled. Doda, a son of Moirosio, sfdd-he was the only nan of importance in the mountain who was not killed. Oar casualties were six killed and wounded. For the gallant manner in which Lient. Springer mounted the scaling ladder, he was gazetted a c;q t tin.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18791223.2.10

Bibliographic details

TERMINATION OF THE BASUTO WAR., Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 38, 23 December 1879

Word Count
269

TERMINATION OF THE BASUTO WAR. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 38, 23 December 1879

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