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RESIDENT MAGISTRA TE'S COURT.

Friday, Deue.mbeii 13. (Before Mr. F. Guinness, 11. M.) EMBEZZLEMENT. Henry Williams Ford was ch ,rged with embezzlement of a watch, value, Ll2 10s. Prisoner pleaded not guilty, and 3 •ryeant Pratt conducted the prosecution. John Pratt deponed—Am Sergeant of police in Ashburton. About half-past ten on the night of the 16th inst., Mr. Ringwood reported to me the loss of a watch from his bedroom at the Somerset Hotel. I went with him to the hotel, and told prisoner of the loss, and also that I wanted to search him in his room. I then searched him and found the chain produced in the Court, which he was wearing. He claimed it as his own property'. The watch dropped out of his drawers on the floor. Both articles were identified by' Mr. Ringwood as his property'. lam informed that their value is Ll2.

By Prisoner—l held up the chain produced before you. You did not say that it belonged to your sister. You did not find the watch yourself and give it to me. I picked it up on the Hour. Alfred Ringwood said—l am cook at the Somerset Hotel. The prisoner slept in the next room to me. He was in my room at 3.20 on the morning of the 16th. He would have to pass my room to reach hiS own. I left my room at six o’clock. 1 did not fasten the door. I sent prisoner out of my room into his own bed. I hang my clothes behind the door. My watch and chain were in my waistcoat. The watch was a lady’s gold Geneva one, and the chain of jet, with a gold swivel. The articles produced are the ones I had in my vest pocket. Prisoner had no right to take the articles. I value them at Ll2.

By the prisoner—A person named Edwards was in the room witli me at the time. He stood by the door, which was ajar. I did not leave the room while you were there.

By the Court—When 1 left my room in the morning I loft the watch and chain in the waistcoat. I did not again take the waistcoat till 9.30 that night, when I missed the watch and reported the loss to Mr. Shearman about 10.30, who advised me to go for the police at once. George Eagle, sworn—Am night porter at the Somerset Hotel. I was in prironer’s bedroom on the night of the IGtli inst. when SergeanTPratt searched him. The watch produced fell out of his drawers on the floor, and Sergeant Pratt picked it up. Prisoner said it was a mystery to him how it should come on his person. The Magistrate gave the usual caution, and prisoner said—When Sergeant Pratt came to me about 11 o’clock on Monday evening, he told me that a watch and chain had been stolen from the hotel, and asked me to let him search me, which I did. I had not the slightest idea at the time that the watch and chain were in my possession. The Magistrate committed prisoner to take his trial at the next sittings of the Supreme Court at Christchurch. LARCENY OF A WATCH. William Brennan was charged with stealing a watch, the property of William Quibble. Prisoner pleaded not guilty. Denis Moroney, constable, sworn, said —The loss of a watch was reported to me yesterday. I i rrested prisoner on the charge, and he admitted having had the watch. I afterwards received the watch produced from Mr. Quinn. Prisoner had nothing else on him, James Quinn, watchmaker, sworn, said —Prisoner came to my shop on Wednesday last, and offered the watch produced to me for sale for 10s. That is about its value. He gave his name as William Ellis. He said he wanted the watch back on Saturday, and would pay me the 10s back and the cost of repairs. Wm. Quibble, sworn—Am a ploughman. Was at the Somerset Hotel on Wednesday. Saw prisoner there. We were drinking together. I had the watch produced in my pocket whilst there. We left the Somerset together and went to M‘Kenzie’s, and I missed the watch next morning. Had not seen prisoner since till to-day. I did not give him leave to take tho watch. I valued it at L2. By the prisoner—Don’t recollect giving you the watch in Shearman’s to take care of. You did not take me to M'Kenzie’s. Prisoner in defence said that the watch had been given to him in presence of Mr. J. Shear mm:) i and he then took Quibble to M'Kenzie’s and laid him on the sofa. The complainant put the watcli in prisoner’s pocket. As they wore both tipsy lie didn’t know any more about it. Joseph Shearman, sworn —Am barman at Somerset Hotel To prisoner—l did not see prosecutor give you a watch. Prisoner asked me to take charge of it. I refused, and he then pot it in his own pocket. The prosecutor was in liquor. The Magistrate said he was quite satisfied as to the theft, and sentenced prisoner to three months, with hard labor. CIVIL CASES. Fergus v. Carlton.—Mr. Purnell for paintitf; no appearance of defendant. Judgment for Ll 4 7s. Saunders Bros. v. Logan.—Tho summons in this gase had been taken out two months ago, and house service had been ordered to be executed, but tho bailiff had not yet effected it. Warner v. Pender.—Claim LI 3s. Id. Plaintiff deponed to the goods having been supplied to the defendant, and that no offer of settleipeijf had been made. Thomas Radford, book-keeper to plaintiff—l gave the goods to the boy to deliver. Some were given to the defendant's wife. The defendant, Robert Pender, said that moie goods were charged for than received, meat is charged for during the time both his wife and himself were .absent. The defendant s wife said tho hill had five items charged which she had not receivedCase adjourned till Tuesday 30th for further evidence.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18791220.2.13

Bibliographic details

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE'S COURT., Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 37, 20 December 1879

Word Count
1,004

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE'S COURT. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 37, 20 December 1879

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