Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

ASHBURTON AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SHOW.

The 1879 Show of the Agricultural and Pastoral Association—the second in the •piety’s histoiy—was held on Tuesday SiMer the most favorable circumstances that could be desired. The weather was delightful, and as a result a large number of visitors attended—as much as £IOO being taken at the gates. The usual hanwors-on were present in force, and added to the fair-like appearance presented by the yards. Among these caterers to the public amusement the 11 nian with the lion ” held a place, and his show was well patronised. The merry-go-round was there—not the merry-go-round we . used to know, but the velocipede substitute, which the proprietor calls a unicyle—(a wag on the ground said a wheel-barrow was a unicycle)—and in the near vicinity a couple of canaries told fortunes, shooting galleries kept a continual rattle, stalls for the sale of trinkets did business, and the loud-voiced modern successor of Shakespere’s Antolycus did his usual amount of trade, while the Brass Band supplied music at intervals. The Show itself was a good one, and an improvement on the last, as the following comparative statement of entries w r ill show : Entries for 1878. 1879. Sheep 58 75 Cattle ... ... 11 'Horses 82 80 Fi» 8 11 Poultry ... ; 11 17 Dogs ... ... ... 8 9 Dairy produce 13 26 Implements'. 50 48 N. Z. Manufactures ... 19 16 Extra Exhibits ... 28 ... ... 95 288 396 The arrangements were complete enough to begin with, but one or two little faults occurred that might have been prevented. They were trifling, however, and in view of the great success of the Show, competitors can afford to forgive any shortcomings. The Secretary, Mr Jameson, had his hands quite full, and had his temper well tried, but lie came out like a a hero, and deserves the Society’s best thanks for the huge labor he was equal to. The Stewards also worked hard, and succeeded in getting the work done in ample time for the afternoon rush of visitors. There is always a difficulty in obtaining judges for cattle shows, and this was no exception, but we are happy to say that when all was done, the exhibitors had little to complain of. The first division in a pastoral county is of course the SHEEP. There was an excellent show of sheep in all the classes, though the Show was not exceptionally large. The first division on the catalogue was merinos, in which some very fine animals were entered. The wool they displayed was of a verygrand character. In most cases the requirements of the catalogue were admirably fulfilled—fine, long, dense, clear, and the fleece equal. Mr. C. Reed’s ram above 18 months was a superior piece of wool, hanging on an excellent frame, but in point of wool we thought he was not any before the second prize, Mr. W. C. Walker’s ram. Gould and Cameron’s entry was highly commended. In the second class, rams under 18 mdnths old, the entries were not many, out six coming up, but they were a good shew, and Mr. Reed again came to the front, Mr. Walker coming second, while another Westerfield sheep came third. In ewes of the same breed above 18 months old the exhibitors were able to come well up to the character of good merinos, and in those shown though all were good it was not very difficult to agree with the judges in their award. It was in merinos that really the best show of sheep was made, and in which most competition took place. The judges had their hands quite full, and it was fully two o’clock before they left the merino pens. LINCOLNS. The turnout here was superb, and the entries showed that as a wool producing country we are not easily rubbed out. Mr Wilkin’s ram, in class seven, was abeauty, as were also the two in the pen adjoining, on one of which the second prize ticket was fastened, and belonged to Mr C. Reid, Mr H. T. Smith’s animal being the penfellow. Mr Wilkin’s ram under 18 months old was a large heavy sheep, with wool fine, long, and clean. We should think the ram was wooled ten inches deep, and otherwise he was a grand animal. His second was not so large a sheep, but he was not far behind. He was another of the Westerfield flock, gome splendid ewes were exhibited in the Lincolns, and in the first ewe class there had been some difficulty as regards penning. There was scope for the exercise of discrimination in awarding the prizes, bo the judges wisely held over their decision till the malarrangement had been put right. The ewes under 18 months were a very nice lot; as indeed were all the longwoolled sheep, though in this particular class, and in fact in most, there was not an overstocked catalogue, the specimens shown, if a fair sample of the flocks from which they were drawn, spoke well for the breeders of the animals and the pastures on which they were fed. tEICESTERS Were almost wholly shown by Messrs. Wilkin and Carter, and were very good indeed. ROMNEY MARSH Was also a “ foregone conclusion ” for the above exhibitors, as no other competitor entered, but what they put in were certainly no'disgrace to any flock. FAT LAMBS AND WETHERS. Some of these were shown, and they promise well, but there was nothing about them callling for special remark. CATTLE. There were only 16 entries of cattle all told, but though the herd was a small one, the animals, if representative of the district, were splendid sponsors. Mr. A. Dawson’s prize bull, of any age—a shorthorn —Em Lonsdale, 6 years, bred by Coutts, of Kaiapoi, was a splendid bull, and deservedly got first prize. Esau 11. was shown in the same class, as well as in two-year-olds.' He was highly spoken of as afine animal for his age. Mr. John Shearer’s ; \ ictorysioo'l inthenextpen to Esau. Heisa younger bull, but promises well. We could not Understand how the awards had been made amongst bulls. There were only four on the ground, and were aged from 6 years downwards, but upon Messrs.

Could and Cameron’s President, calved since July 1 last year, there was placed second ticket. He was the only entry in his class, and it is quite possible that the whole four bulls were judged together. In that case the place President secured was a high one. There were eleven cows shown, and of the lot for the best of any age, Mr. A. Dawson pulled off first with his Beauty, Messrs Gould and Cameron being second with Countess. The only heifer contest lay between Messrs Gould and Cameron, and Mr. John Small, and the animals of these gentlemen were placed in the order above named.

A neaf little Brittany cow and calf—the exhibits of Messis Wilkin and Carter —won the judges’ favor, as did the motherly-looking roan cow of Mr Magee. The latter got first prize as the best milch cow of any age. HORSES. BLOOD STOCK. Five figured in the catalogue in the blood stock. Prince Alfred, a Sorcerer colt, would have been better left at home, as he was completely put in the shade by the quality of the others ; Admiral again took the pride of place, and deservedly, for although many breeders cannot be pm suaded to have anything to do with a horse not having Traducer blood in his veins the old chestnut is one not to be passed by. Mr. L. E. Corsbie’s Tribune came very close to him, but had to accept second honors. Mr. Little’s two exhibits, Camden and Young Traducer were in the pink of condition, the latter having a great number of admirers. Two showed up in the two-year-olds, a very handsome little pony by Hadji Baba, exhibited by Mr George Parkin, being particularly well shown, but only got second, Mr Passmore’s Commodore, by Admiral, a leggy looking colt, looking as if he had had a bad winter, taking first. DRAUGHT STOCK. For the best entire horse of any age, six entries were made, Mr. M'Kellar’s Victor decidedly catching the judge’s eye, Billy Fairplay making a good fight for the premier position. Mr. Patton’s Young Ivaiihoe being highly commended. In tbo three year old class three entries were on the list, and all of first-class quality, and shewing evidence that our local breeders can exhibit stock equal to anything in the colony. Mr W. T. Smith’s Samson is one of the bulkiest three-year-olds we ever saw, but bis carcase appeared to be too heavy for the legs under. Mr. Grigg’s Beaconsfield, who took second at the Metropolitan show last week, is a model all "ver, he being greatly admired by the judges. Strathmore is a grand stamp, a rich dark chestnut, with white feet, first-class action, and although not particularly handsome had the appearance of being a thorough good stock getter. Mr. Grigg s horse was given first honors, Mr. Mathews’ second, and the black was highly commended. The two-year-olds brought out five colts, Mr Stoddart’s Invincible looking all over the making of a grand entire, being well feathered, having good bone, and showing quality all over. Mr E. Thomas’ Commander, though a trifle lighter, was perhaps superior in quality, and was, in our opinion, one of the best ever shown in Canterbury. Mr Grigg’s Waveriy was particularly handsome, as we should expect from so celebrated a breeding establishment. He is a rare mover. The first prize was awarded to Mr. Stoddart’s Invincible, Mr E. Thomas having to accept second honors. He not having been handled in time moved about in a rather slovenly manner. A highly commended ticket was awarded to Waveriy. For the best mare in foal or with foal at foot, fivejwere entered. Mr. R. Matthews took first with Violet, who was undoubtedly the best draught mare in any class on the ground, and the same owner had one nearly as good in Highland Mary, Messrs. Gould and Cameron’s Darling was very highly commended, and the same firm also had a commended ticket for Duchess. Mr. George Grice got a highly commended for a good sort of a chesnut mare with a grand foal at foot by Sir Julius Vogel. In three-year old biood mares, Mr. W. H. Smitli took first and S. Holland second, neither being particularly good. McDowell Bros, entered one in this class, and she was disqualified on account of an error in her entry, she being a four year old. This was to be regretted as the mare was a perfect beauty The two year-olds brought out seven, all good, Mr. R. Matthews again taking first, and his neighbor, Mr Stoddart, second. Mr. P. Maddon, of the Wakanui, being very highly commended, and Mr. John Bell was also commended. The best gelding of any age found the winner in Mr. John Frazer’s dark chestnut, and he is a specially good horse, having enormous bone and symmetry. Mr. James Scott, of Chatmoss, took second with old “Bob,” who has now reached the patriarchal age of 24 years, but looks as fresh as a colt. For the best team of three horsers there were three entries, Mr. John Grigg showing a trio of' mares, and another of geldings, and Mr. S. Miller had three very powerful looking horses, which however showed signs of hard work, and the quality of all the exhibits was so even that the judges had to call in the assistance of Mr. Calvert to decide. Eventually Mr. Grigg was awarded first and second, and Mr. Miller very highly commended. CARRIAGE HORSES. Carriage horses brought out four really grandhorses, Dexter being admired for the grand top and crest he has, but his hocks met with considerable criticism. Blue Light was looked upon as the beat-look-ing in the ring, some judges considering him rather out of his class. Tam-o’-Shanter has improved wonderfully during the past twelve months, and is as pretty as a picture. Harkaway, a rich, dark, chestnut, by Messenger, did not look in as good fettle as the others. The judges had considerable difficulty in making any award, and finally gave first to Mr. W. H. Smith for Tam-o’-Shanter, and second to Blue Light, Dexter being highly commended. In mares of this class Mr. James Ward, of Longbeach, exhibited his well known chestnut, and there was no hesitation about at once awarding her the premier place, and her foal, by Traitor, was a very symmetrical little gentleman. Mr. L. E. Corsbie’s Golconda, with foal by Tribune, second, and Messrs Wilkin and Carter’s Decimena commended.

Class 16 and 17 each had one entry, and in the former there was no award, but Bakaia Charlie, by Admiral, secured a first in the latter. He is a colt of immense substance, but at present is too loose, but if acquires compactness

and nice action will make a grand sire in a few years.

HACKNEYS. In hackney entries the two exhibits were young horses. Liberal was by far the better of the two, but owing to a slight lameness which impaired his movements, he had to succumb to Sir George, a very common bay. Brood maresfonndonlyonerepresentative in Mr Miller’s Phuebe, an honest looking bay. to whom first honors were warded. Eight roadsters appeared on the catalogue, and of these six came into the ring. They were as a lot the finest we have seen at any show in Canterbury, and the competition was very keen. Why Not, a perfect looking weight carrying hunter, was placed first, and would have been one of the 500 guinea sort in an English hunt ing county, hut as a hack we fancied Mr. M‘Loan’s Black Boy more. Black Boy is a truly grand horse, well up to twenty stone, and if long years of service had not made him a trifle stiff, he undoubtedly would have reached nearer the front than third. Glengary was second, and he was in very excellent style, although his bad temper gave Lawson some trouble in making the most of him. Serf is a magnificent four-year-old by Sorcerer, and such a horse passing the judges without notice is sufficient evidence of the merit of the whole class. Ladies hacks were also very superior, Orange Peel was put into first place, and is certainly a nice horse, beautifully handled by Mrs. Wilkie, but we thought Miss Guinness’ Colonial and Mrs. Campbell’s Miss French, ridden by Miss Miller, quite equal to the winner. Miss French was awarded second and Colonial third, the latter being ridden in Miss Jameson’s well known and excellent style. Ponies brought out four small ones, and Messrs Saunders Brothers’ exhibit, Topsy. got into first place, a position which she deserved, not alone from her appearance hut also her capital manners. Dixey was second, looking well although a little old. Cabs were only an ordinary lot, and Lilly won first, although we liked Mazoppa, a cream colored pony of nice size equally well. PIGS. With Waterton so near at hand, whore some farms have gained quite a name for Berkshires,'it would have been surprising had no pigs put in an appearance at the Show. We had expected a larger turn out, however, than what we saw, but the specimens exhibited were good evidence that pig rearing is not neglected. The boars were very presentable gnmtera, and the prize sow was a fine pig, as was also the second—both would have been creditable anywhere. Dir. John Shearer was the only exhibitor of a boar under twelve months, but the judges fancied that he was of too small a breed to be entitled to a prize. In the class of brood sows of any age or breed, Mr. Ede pulled off Ist. prize with, as wo have said, a very creditable animal, and the second was like unto it. Mr. Shearer’s entry was also a good pig, though a trifle less deserving than her rivals. Mr. Stalker’s best sow of any breed under 12 months was a trig little pig. In the fifth class best sow and litter of pigs—Mr. G. T. Smith was first, but his sow seemed to be rather too fine ; and the second, Mr. G. Gilmour’s, was out of condition, so that any judgment upon her would be injudicious. POULTRY. In bantams Master W. Parkin got a first with a very handsome cock and pair of hens, of the black breasted game variety, the other exhibit being passed over on account of the color not being even. A great mistake was made by having the various breeds of fowls all exhibited under the general heading of ‘ ‘ Best fowls of any breed,” and, we saw spangled Polands, Brahmas, and Spanish all competing in the same class, thus making the judging a most difficult matter. The first prize was awarded to Mr. John Connel for a veiy good trio of Spanish fowls—Mr. G. J. Smith’s Polands taking second, Mr. W. J. Silcock’s buff cochins being highly commended and we think deserved something better. Pigeons had six entries—Messrs. Saunders Bros, and Mr. A. Collins having three entries each, the former deservedly gaining two firsts—blue dragoon and red and blue turbets, and the latter a second with red and blue Antwerps. DOGS. The dog show was not a large one, but it was choice and good. Five sheep dogs were shown, out of which Mr. Donald M'Lean’s Joss walked to the front, followed in order of merit by Mr. Crawley’s Laddie. Joss is well known in the district as one of the best of Mr. M‘Lean’s lot, and deservedly got golden opinions from all sorts of people who admire a good collie. Laddie, too, was appreciated as he must when his breed and marking are considered. Cattle dogs to the number of four were shown, and their merits were well canvassed during the day. Mr. Jones’ Jack we fancied would have been better shown as a sheep dog, and as such we doubt not he would measure well with anything that can be shown against him. Pepper—Mr. Miller’s dog, we felt sure could be trained to almost any kind of shepherding, he looked so wise and sensible, while Mr. Smith’s Stumpy would be just the dog to bring to mind Barns’ “ Luath.” We had expected to see more sheep dogs, entered, knowing the number and quality of those in the district, but somehow shepherds don’t seem to care for tying up their dogs in a showyard. The other dogs shown were a quartette of Dindie Dimnonts by Mr. C. W. Ireland —beauties in their way, and Scotchmen were all about there. The little terriers were well patronised during the day, and the exhibitor was highly complimented on his entry. The pup among the four took our fancy most, as showing the Scotch terrier in every point. Mrs George Jameson’s Loo was there in all her St. Bernard glory and was much admired. Mr Hicks Bedlington was not neglected either by visitors, hut his tribe is not so well known in the colony nor so much appreciated as it ought to be, and will be when its merits are better known. Mr Campbell’s pretty spaniels were also shown; as were also Messrs Saunders beagles, and greyhounds. IMPLEMENTS. The exhibits of implements was exceptionally good, a large number of the articles which took prizes at the Metro politan Show being sent to Ashburton, and in addition several of our local firms, notably Messrs Friedlander Bros, and Orr and Co., were conspicuous, both for the number and quality of the articles shown. As at Christchurch the colonial made implements showed to great

advantage over the foreign made, the former being in most cases shown polished, by which the defects, if any, could be at once detected, whilst the English made articles being painted in gorgeous colours were not so likely to meet with favor where utility is of more importance than gaudiness. The stewards had made good arrangements for this department, there being plenty of room for all to see all visitors wished to see. The greatest difficulty experienced in this class as well as in others was the difficulty of finding judges, as it cannot be expected that gentlemen from other parts of the province can get on the ground before the arrival of the 11 o’clock express. However, although some of the awards were made late in the day, the Committee arc to be congratulated on the success achieved. There were 48 entries in the implement class. In the single furrow ploughs, Messrs P. and D. Duncan took first and second prize, there being no competitors. Both exhibits were of great merit, the second having asub-soiler attached. In double furrows Messrs. Reid and Gray as usual took first with a well finished article, P. and D. Duncan second, Edmiston Bros, and Gundry exhibiting a useful Reid and Gray, marked for sale at the low figure of £lB. A Ransome and Sims treble furrow, exhibited a by Messrs. Orr and Co., obtained a commended, the price being £24. There were 0 entries in heavy harrows, Mr. James Little, of Woodentl, being first and second, the workmanship being particularly good, Orr and Co s. £8 10s. set obtaining a highly commended. Light harrows also found a winner in Mr. James Little for first and third. Best corn and seed drill class had only two entries—Messrs. Jameson Bros taking first with a 9ft. Suffolk, and Mr. F. B. Passmore second with a Surrey. In rollers—Rei-' and Gray’s manufacture wrested the first from an English made article. Four reapers and binders wore shown, but not judged, and a couple of buck-eye reapers and mowers have an appearance of great strength, combined with lightness. Mr. Little entered three horse hoes, one, to which an expanding attachment was fixed, being a most ingenious and useful article, a three tined one taking second, in drays, Reid and Gray took first with a cart which showed first class workmanship, P. and D. Duncan second. A three horse draymade by Mr. P. Journeaux was a very good one.

Mr Begg, blacksmith, Tinwahl, showed a novelty in harrows. The peculiarity of his exhibit consisted in the manner in which the harrow teeth were connected by means of a light rod running through each row, which were kept at their proper distance by a small tube fitted to the framework. The advantage gained by this is that, should a defect be found in, or accident occur to, any single tooth, or number of teeth, the unscrewing of a nut and the withdrawal of the rod will enable the operator to affix new teeth with very little loss of time —a great advantage in cases where a smith is some miles distant. The contrivance, compensating for any loss of strength in the line, is very ingenious, and we hope that the harrows will stand the test of practical working. MISCELLANEOUS EXHIBITS. In these, local industry was represented by a well-made saddle by Tait and Co., and a set of cart harness complete. The Kaiapoi Woollen Factory spread out a most cosy-looking selection of woollen goods, and Mr T. Chambers, Ashburton, represented the immortal art of Crispin with a very creditable entry of boots. Montgomery and Co.’s exhibits of fireclay goods showed how well the kiln keeps to the front, and how the colonial potter knows his business. A sample of flax goods deserves mention, as the pioneer of an industry we shall yet hear of in New Zealand. It was Mr Leet’s entry. There were also entered a collection of plants by Mrs Mitchell; a hearthrug, made at the Old Men’s Home, Mr. E. Cookson being the exhibitor ; a collection of drapery by Messrs. Orr and Co ; quite a host of chaff cutters, horse gears, corn crushers, cooking ranges, &c. In the same line, Messrs. Friedlander made quite a show themselves of American skill, and spread out 15 entries of ingenuity stoves, store trucks, lawn mowers, windmills, force pumps, steel planes, nail pullers, saw clamps, hand force pumps, or hydropults, harvest tools of improved kinds, self-acting cheesepresses, counter scales, horse-power chaffcutters and corn crushers, were each represented, while Mr. Pavitt put in a horse hoe, scuffler, and moulding plough combined. Altogether the extra exhibits were an interesting exhibition. The following is the PRIZE LIST. SHEEP. MERINOS. Judges —Mr J. Chalmers, Mr. McLean, Mr. ■Stitt. Class I—Ram1 —Ram above eighteen months old. 1, W. C. Walker; 2, Gould and Cameron ; highly commended, Chas. Reid ; commended, Chas Reid. Class 2 —Ram under eighteeen months old. 1, Chas. Reid; 2, W. C. Walker; highly commended, W. C. Walker; commended, Chas. Reid. Class 3 —Ewe above eighteen months old. 1, Gould and Cameron ; highly commended, Charles Reid ; commended, Gould and Cameron. Class 4 —Ewe under eighteen months old. 1 and 2, Charles Reid ; highly commended, Gould and Cameron. Class 5 —Three ewes above eighteen mouths old. 1, Gould and Cameron ;2, Charles Reid ; highly commended, Gould and Cameron ; commended, Charles Reid. Class 6—Three ewes under eighteen months old. 1 and 2, Charles Reid; highly commended, Gould and Cameron. LINCOLNS. Judges —Messrs A. Turnbull, J. T. Ford, and R. Coup. Class 7 —Ram above eighteen months old, I, Wilkin and Carter ; 2, Charles Reid. Class B—Ram under eighteen months old. I, Wilkin and Carter ; 2, Charles Reid. Class 9 —Ewe above eighteen months old. I and 2, Wilkin and Carter. Class 10 —Ewe under eighteen months old. i, Wilkin and Carter; 2, and highly commended, Charles Reid. Class 11 Three ewes above eighteen months old. Wilkin and Carter. LEICESTER. Judges—Messrs. A. Turnbull, J. T. Ford, and R. Coup. Class 14 —Ram under eighteen months old. Wilkin and Carter; 2, James Scott; highly commended, Wilkin and Carter. Class 15 —Ewe above eighteen months old. Wilkin and Carter.

Class 16—Ewe under eighteen months old. I, and highly commended, Wilkin and Carter. Class 17 —Three ewes above eighteen months old. 2, Wilkin and Carter.

Class 18 Three ewes under eighteen months old. i, Wilkin and Carter. ROMNEY MARSH. Judges—Messrs. A. Turnbull. J. T. Ford, and A. Coup. Class 20 —Rani under eighteen months old. I and 2, Wilkin and Carter. Class 21 —Ewe above eighteen months old. Wilkin and Carter. Class 22 —Ewe under eighteen months old. I, Wilkin and Carter. Class 23 —Three ewes above eighteen months old. 1, Wilkin and Carter. Class 24 —Three ewes under eighteen months old. I, Wilkin and Carter. LAMBS. Class 23—-Ten fat lambs. 1, Wilkin and Caller. VAT WET hicks. Class 26—Five fat wethers of any age or breed. 1, R. Lancaster. CATTLE. (Imported or otherwise.) Judges —Messrs. Roht. Wilkin, P. C. Threlkeld, John Keiland, W. Lunn. SHORTHORNS. Class I—Full,1 —Full, of any age. I, A. Dawson's Earl Lonsdale. Class 3 —Bull calved since Jan. 1, 1877. 1, Thomas Magee’s Esau 11. Class 4 —Bull calved since July 1, 1877. I, Gould and Cameron’s President 11. Class s—Cow5 —Cow of any age. 1, A. Dawson’s Beauty ; 2, Gould and Cameron’s Countess. Class 6—Heifer calved since July 1, 1877. 1, Gould and Cameron’s Rose : 2, John Small’s Polly. Class 13 —Cow of any age. Highly commended, Wilkin and Carter’s Brittany. Class 15 —Heifer calved since July I, 1576. 1, 11. T. Smith ; 2, Gill, Class 17 —Milch Cow of any age or breed. 1, Thomas Magee ; 2, D. Cochrane. Class 18—Fat steer calved since July Ist, 1877. 1, H. T. Smith. HORSES. Imported or otherwise. BLOOD STOCK. Judges—Messrs J. Page, G. D. Lockhart, J. Hurst, and W. Marcroft. Class I—Thoroughbred stallion. I, Webb’s Admiral ; 2, L. E. Corsbie’s Tribune ; highly commended, K. Little’s Young Traducer. Class 3 —Colt foaled since July Ist., 1877i, Frank B. Passmore’s Commodore ; 2. G. Parkin’s Arab, DRAUOH r HORSES. Judges —Messrs M. Boag, W. B. Campbell, James Walls, and G. Edwards. Class 6—Entire horse of any age. 1, M'Keller’s Victor; 2, Wilkin and Carter’s Billy Fairplay ; highly commended, Patton’s Young Ivanhoe. Class 7 —Entire horse foaled since July Ist., 1876. John Grigg’s Lord Beaconsfield; 2, R. Matthew’s Strathmore. Class B—Entire hoise foaled since July rst., 1877. 1, W. Stoddart’s Invincible; 2, E. Thomas’ Commander ; highly commended. John Grigg’s Waverly; commended, F. B. Passmore’s Duke. Class 9 —Mare in foal, or with foal at foot. I, R. Matthews’ Violet; 2, R. Matthews’ Highland Mary ; highly commended, G. Grice. Class 10 —Filly foaled since July Ist, 1876. I, W. H. Smith, Young Darling; 2, S. Holland; highly commended, Maddon, Nellie. Class 13 —Team of three horses, either mares or geldings, of any age in regular work, the bona fide property of the exhibitor, to be shown in harness. 1 and 2 John Grigg; highly commended, Samuel Millar. CARRIAGE HORSES. Judges—Messrs Joshua Page, G. D. Lockhart, Jas. Hurse, W. Marcroft. Class 14 —Entire of any age. I, W. H. Smith’s Tam-o’-Shanter ; 2, R. Friedlander’s Blue Light. Class JS —Brood Mare. I, J. S. Ward’s Ohinenmri ; 2, Lewis Corsbie’s Golconda; commended, Wilkin and Carter’s Decimena. Class 17 —Filly or colt foaled since July Ist. 1877. 1, John Harrison’s Rakaia Charlie. HACKNEYS. Class 19 —Entire horse, of any age. I, J. Holmes, bay horse, Sir George. Class 10 —Broodmare, in foal or with foal at loot. 1, R Miller, Phcebe. Class 21 —Roadster or hack ,mare or gelding. I, Saunders Bros., Whynot; 2, John McLean’s Black Boy. Class 22 —Hack, mare or gelding, not exceeding 13 hands high. 1, J. M'Causland’s bay gelding, Orange Peel ; 2, Miss Guinness’ chestnut gelding, Colonel ; highly commended, Mrs Campbell, Black Bess. Class 23 —Pony, mare or gelding, not exceeding 13 hands high. I, Saunders Bros., brown mare, Topsy ; 2, Miss Campbell’s bay mare, aged. Class 24—Cob, mare or gelding, not exceeding 14 hands high. I, Jas. Clark, Lilly ;2, Alf Collins, Mazeppa. PIGS. Judges—Messrs T. 11. Green, C. Bearing, and J. Gilmour. Class I—Boar1 —Boar or any age or breed. 1, G. Gilmore, Berkshire; 2, A. Ede, Berkshire. Class 3 —Breeding sow, of any age or breed. 1, A. Ede, Berkshire sow ; 2, Hugh Rainey, Berkshire sow, bred by C. McClure. Class 4 —Best sow of any breed, under twelve months of age. I, W. Stalker. Class S —Sow and litter of pigs, not less than six, under two months old. I, G. T. Smith’s sow and 10 pigs; 2, G. Gilmore, Berkshire. IMPLEMENTS. Judges—Messrs. J. Johnston (Rangiora), W, A. Brown, and F. B. Passmore. Class I—Single furrow plough. I and 2, P. and D. Duncan. Class 2 Double-furrow plough, with handles. P. and D. Duncan. Class 3 —Double furrow lever plough. I, Reid and Gray ; 2, P. and I). Duncan. Class 4 —Three ' furrow plough. Highly commended, Orr and Co. Class s—Pair5 —Pair heavy harrows. I, James Little, five leaved diamond ; 2, James Little, three leaved diamond ; highly commended, Orr and Co. Class 6—Pair, of light harrows. 1, James Little, three leaved diamond ; 2, James Little, four leaved diamond. Class 7 —Pair chain harrows. Highly commended, James Little. Class B—Broadcast sowing machine. I and 2, P. and D. Duncan. Class 9 —Drill, either for corn or seed. 2, Frank B. Passmore, Surrey Drill. Class 11 —Roller or clod crusher. I, Reid and Gray ; 2, Jameson Bros. Class 13 —Reaping machine. 1, Montgomery and Co., Buckeye. Class 14 —Grass stripper, adapted for stripping rye grass. 1, P. and D. Duncan. Class 16—Hay loader. Highly commended, Edmiston Brothers and Gundry. Class 17 —Set of whippletrees for three horses. 1, Reid and Gray ;2. Tomlin. Class 19 —Horse hoe. 1, James Little, expanding hoe ; 2, James Little, tined with steel blades. Class 21 —Cart or dray, for farm purposes. I, Reid and Gray, three horse dray ; 2, P. and D. Duncan, tip-cart. POULTRY. Judges—Messrs. Jas, Wood and Hunt. Class 4 —Best bantams. I, W. Parkin, black breasted red game. Class s—Best5 —Best fowls, of any breed. I, Jas. Me Connell, pen of Spanish ; 2, G. T. Smith. PIGEONS. Class B—Pair pigeons, of any description, i, Saunders Bros. Class 9 —Pair carrier pigeons, of any breed. 1, Saunders Bros. ; 2, Alfred Collins. DOGS. Judges—Messrs P. C. Cameron, M. Stitt, N. McLean. Class I—Sheepdog. 1, D. McLean’s Joss ; 2, J, Lloyd Crawley’s Laddie.

Class s—Cattle5 —Cattle clog. I, Anthony Thompson’s Jim ; 2, H. T. Smith’s Stumpy. AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE. Exhibited by growers only, and exhibits to be from crop harvested in 1879. Class 2 —Fortlie best sample not less than one bushel, winter wheat. 1, Friedlander Pros. DAIRY PRODUCE. | udges—Messrs T. 11. Green, C. Dearing. Class I—3lbs.1 —3lbs. fresh butter, without prints. 1, MrsHoare; 2, Mrs Trevurza; highly commended, Mrs Thos. Willson ; commended, Mrs Wilson. Class 2 -Keg of salt butter, fit for exportation. 1, Mrs \V. Stalker. Class 3 —Colonial cheese of not less than colb. I, Mrs. Fleming. Class 4 —Side New Zealand cured bacon. 1, G. Gilmore. Class s—Two5 —Two hams. 1, G. Gilmore. N.Z. MANUFACTURES AND PRODUCE. Judges—Messrs E. S. Coster, Edwards, Struthers, and Bullock. Ale —5 gallons ale (imported hops allowed). 1, Quinton Bros.; 2, and highly commended, Wood and Co. Porter—s gallons, (coloring matter allowed). 1, Wood and Co.; 2, Quinton Bros.; highly commended, Wood and Co. Saddle —Canterbury made saddle, with furniture complete, price to be affixed. I, Tait and Co. Cart harness— 1, Tait and Co. Collection of New Zealand manufactured woollen goods. Kaiapoi Woollen Factory. Collection 0/ colonial made boots—T. Chambers. Collection of fire clay goods—Highly commended, Montgomery and Co., Limited. Extra Leaping Match—Mr. Scott cleared 4ft 3in. EXTRA EXHIBITS. Samples of flax goods—Highly commended James Seed. Collection of goods made from New Zealand wool—Kaiapoi Woollen Factory. Hearthrug made at Old Men’s Home, Ashburton. 1, E. Cookson. M‘Dowell and Co.’s fire kindlers—Mr. Tasker’s sample. Collection of tools, &c. (fifteen articles) — Highly commended, Frledlander Bros. PRIVATE PRIZES. Joseph Clark’s prize of £2 2s. for best collection of New Zealand manufactured woollen goods—l, Kaiapoi Woollen Factory. President’s prize of £2 for best two-year-old draught Gelding—2, and commended, John Grigg. A Late Friend's prize of £2 3s. for best > earling colt or filly— 1, W. Stoddart’s Gipsy. James Scott’s prize of £2 2s. for best weightcarrying roadster or hack (mare or gelding) —I, John M ‘Lean’s Black bey. Mr. Scott’s prize of £2 2s. for best milk cow in full profit—l, Thos. Magee’s Alice ; 2, D. Cochrane’s Nellie. Edrnistonand Gundry’s prize of £2 2S. foi best sample of hams and bacon, cured by farmers —I, G. Gilmour. Acland, Campbell, and Co.’s prize of £2 2s. for best pair draught mares, property of one owner, Jhat have been in regular work—1, Matthews. Mr. Matson’s prize of £3 3 s - for best single buggy horse, to be shown in harness—l, E. Cookson’s grey gelding Patch. Mr. Anderson’s prize of a lady’s bridle for best lady’s hack— 1, J. McCauslaud’s Orange Peel. Messrs. P. Cunningham and Co.’s prize of £3 3s. for best collection of farm seeds—l, Friedlander Bros.; highly commended, Jameson Bros. Mr. R. W. Shearman’s prize of £2 2S for best round of cured corn beef, and £l is. for second best if there are at least three exhibitors —l, R. Lancaster, 7d. per lb, ;2, Mai tin, 7d per lb. THE DINNER. The dinner was held in the evening in the sample room of the Somerset Hotel, when there was a very large attendance of guests. Mr Shearman provided a very excellent dinner which was done ample justice to. The chair was occupied by Mr. John Grigg, President of the Ashburton Agri cultural and Pastoral Association, and the vice chair by Mr. W. C. Walker, County Chairman. The Chairman proposed the usual loyal toasts, which were enthusiastically drunk. The Chairman then gave “The Governor,” stating it was probable that if the Parliament had not been sitting his Excellency would have been happy to have visited their show that day. The next toast given was “ The Army, Navy, and Volunteers,” the Chairman remarking that he felt sure this was a toast which would be drunk most enthusiastically, as they owed the peace and comfort which they now enjoyed to the army, navy, and volunteers. The truest way to preserve peace was to be prepared for war. He would couple the toast with the names of Mr Guinness, Mr Crawley, and Captain Bullock, of the Ashburton Volunteers. Mr Guinness, R. M., responded on behalf of the army. Captain Bullock responded on behalf of the Volunteers, and said that he hoped Ashburton and other inland towns would keep up their Volunteer corps though peace still reigned in the Middle Island. The Vice-Chairman rose to propose the next toast, “The General Assembly.” The members of that body had just returned from their constituents, SO that they must conclude that they had the confidence of the country. He regretted very much that no one was here to respond to the toast, but he trusted next year the members would be released from their duties when the Ashburton show came round, and so he able to be with them at dinner.

The toast was drunk with enthusiasm.

Mr. W. A. Brown (Chertsey), rose to propose the next toast, that of “The County Council.” He thought that the County Council did their work to the satisfaction of the County at large. They heard of no complaints, and they possessed the confidence of the people. While the County Council did their work so well, they would have no reason to complain of having had the County system introduced. The toast was drunk with enthusiam. Mr. Walker, Chairman of the Council, returned thanks. He trusted that so long as they continued in office they might merit the confidence of the ratepapers. During the time he had had the honor to preside over the Council the work had been done without any ill feeling or hard words, and he trusted expeditiously. Before sitting down he desired to propose the health of another Council, younger than the one he had the honor to represent, but one’which had done its best to embellish the town of Ashburton. He referred to the Borough Council of Ashburton. The works which had been executed by this Council had been well carried out, and he need only refer to what had happened on Saturday night with reference to the pipe wells. But for their provision by the Borough a great deal more damage would have occurred. (Cheers.) He coupled the toast with the name of Mr. Bullock, the first Mayor.

The toast was drunk with loud cheers,

Mr. Bullock responded. He claimed for the Council the desire to do the very best they could for Ashburton. Had it not been for the wells made by the Council a very large proportion of the town would have been burned down. He thought that considering the success of the pipe wells the Insurance Companies should concontribute towards the cost of sinking further wells. (Cheers.) Song—Mr. Thomas.

Mr. Carter proposed the next toast, that of the Judges, who, he thought, had done their duty well and truly that day. He coupled the toast with the name of Mr. Wm. Boag. (Cheers.) The toast was drunk with musical honours.

Mr. W. Boag responded to the toast. He had had the pleasure of being present at the first show of the Ashburton Agricultural and Pastoral Association, and ho must say that from the district which surrounded Ashburton the stock which should be raised would be a credit to any part of the Southern Hemisphere. He had been judging in draught horses that day, and his brother judges and himself had had before them some very fine animals indeed, which would do great credit to any show yard in the colony. The judges had done their duty that day fearlessly and honestly, and he trusted they had satisfied the competitors. (Cheers.) Song— Mr. Davis. Mr. C. P. Cox proposed, “ The Successful competitors,” coupling with the toast thenamesofMr. Matthews, ofLeeston, who had brought a large number of horses, andMr. Joseph Clark, the representative here of the Kaiapoi Woollen Factory. (Cheers). The toast was drunk with musical honors.

Mr. Matthews and Mr. Clark responded. The latter said that the specimens shown that day by the young factory he represented showed that they could produce manufactures equal to any that could be imported. Therefore, he thought that men could not better advance the interests of the colony than by promoting manufactures and encouraging local industries. He trusted to see these factories not alone in Kaiapoi and Mosgiel, but in every town in the colony, and he hoped at no distant day to see one in Ashburton. Song—Mr. Passmore. Mr. Clarke proposed the next toast—= “ The unsuccessful Competitors,” hoping that they would try again on a future occasion. He coupled the toast with the name of Mr Stitt. The toast was drunk with musical honors.

Mr Stitt responded briefly. Song—Mr Jacobson. Mr Guineas proposed the next toast—- “ The Christchurch Agricultural and Pastoral Association.” He thought that nothing had done so much good to the prosperity of the county as institutions of this character. They conduced more than anything else to the advancement ol the colony, and hand in hand with the went the manufacturer, vdiose efforts would in years to come raise up a country as great as that, from which they had sprung. (Cheers.) , Ha would couple the toast with the name of Mr. Thomas. The toast was drunk with musical honors.

Mr Thomas responded, claiming for the Christchurch Society the premier position in the colony as an Agricultural Society, He considered the Christchurch Show as one of the best south of the line. This, coming as it did from a Victorian, who had visited all the leading Shows of Victoria and New South Wales, must be taken as being sincere. (Cheers.) Mr Passmore rose to propose the next toast —“ The Commercial Interests,” coupled with the names of Mr Johnson (Rangiora), and Mr E. Saunders. In proposing the toast Mr Passmore spoke of the strides made by the province in the matter of commerce. The toast wais drunk heartily. Messrs. Johnson and Saunders responded to the toast. Mr Bullock rose to propose the toast of “The Ashburton Agricultural and Pastoral Association.” The show of so young an Association that day—only its second—was highly creditable. He desired to mention that four beasts bred in that district had been sold at the Christchurch sale on Saturday last at £IOO each. This was one of the results of the operations of associations such as the Ashburton one. He would couple with the toast the name of their President, Mr John Grigg. That gentleman had purchased the pick of the Christchurch beasts, which would come into that district, and thus improve the breed of their stock. (Cheers). The toast, was drunk with enthusiasm.

Mr Grigg responded, congratulating the district upon the success which had attended the Show of that day. To show the success that had attended their efforts, as compared with last year, he might say that the receipts for gate money last year had only been £22, whilst this year it had been £IOO. Last year also the entries had been 283 and this year 396, which showed a very large increase. He trusted that the success this year would stimulate the farmers to come in and join the Association. Mr. Grigg went on to advocate very strongly the formation of farmers’ clubs in the various districts to watch over the interests of the farmers. He also advocated the formation, in the district, of a cheese factory, as he thought that the natural advantages of the district would cause this to be a success.

Mr. Cameron proposed the next toast, that of “ The Working Committee,” coupled with the names of Messrs. Hunt, Carter, and C. P. Cox. These gentlemen responded. Mr. Cox proposed, “ The Officers of the Association, Mr. George Jameson and Mr. Shury. ” They all owed a very deep debt of gratitude to their Secretary for the way in which he had worked. He desired to couple with the toast the name of Mr. Shury because of the prompt and businesslike manner in which he took charge of the £IOO spoken of by Mr. Grigg as having been taken at the gates. The toast was drunk enthusiastically. Mr. Jameson and Mr. Shury briefly responded. Dr. Stewart rose to propose the toast of “ The Press,” coupled with the names of Mr Ivess and the proprietors of the “ Herald,” and the “ Guardian.” Mr. Donnelly, the representative of the “ Mail,” Mr. Zouch, the “Lyttelton Times,” and Mr. Jacobson, the “Press, ’’ respond el to the toast. Mr. Buchanan proposed, the toast of “ The Ladies.”

This brought the proceedings to a close,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18791120.2.14

Bibliographic details

ASHBURTON AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SHOW., Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 24, 20 November 1879

Word Count
7,424

ASHBURTON AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SHOW. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 24, 20 November 1879

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working