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The Ashburton Guardian. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & SPORTING RECORDER. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1879.

A correspondent of a Wellington paper is sanguine than an Exhibition in New Zealand, held in 1880 or 1881, similar to that in either Sydney or Melbourne, would be a great success, and a substantial benefit to the colony. We are afraid our Exhibition would tread to closely on the heels of those of our neighbours, though we have no doubt, if such a display of our resources and products were held, our colony would be advertised as it n ;ver has been hitherto. It is astonishing notwithstanding all our outcry, how little practically is known about New Zealand in the Old Country, and in too many cases the whole Australasian colonies are summed up as one, or at least as lying within a stone’s throw of each other. For all practical purposes Australia is as far away from New Zealand as England is from the United States, and communication has to be kept up in exactly the same way ; but to a very great extent at Home the error is made that we lie so closely to each other as to be almost identical in interests. Just as a war is the best teacher of geography to the masses, but to none more effectually than to the soldiers who take part in it, so would any attraction that would turn the special attention to ourselves of those whose attention we wish to court, be the best exponent of our colony’s value ; and more especialy would anything bringing in an influx of foreign visitors be a means of disabusing the English and American mind of errors regarding our position and worth. We are afraid there are too many difficulties in the way of an exhibition being held in New Zealand at so early a

date as tliat pointed to by the writer to whom we refer, but we feel that sometime in the next decade a show of what the colony can do as one of the world’s producers, and what she might be made do, were the proper hands put to the work backed with the needful capital and enterprise, will be absolutely necessary, if we are not to lag behind the sister colonies. Meanwhile, however, we are afraid we must be content for a time with the reflected advantages we may derive from the industrial fairs held on the other side.

Archery Club. Several ladies and gentlemen in Ashburton have formed an archery and lawn tennis club, and this afternoon they will hold their first field day on the grounds of Dr. Trevor, Trevorton.

Snow Storm. —As the rain-fall that drenched Timaru travelled Northwards, it seems to have become snow, hail, and all sorts of disagreeable solidifications of water, since one of our reporters on his way from Mount Somers yesterday morning found himself floundering through a belt of snow about 3 miles wide and 0 inches deep. We are glad to say that no damage lias been done to the crops.

Ashburton at the Show.— Prominent among the exhibits at the Show yesterday, in Christchurch, were the first and second prizes gained by our local brewery for porter. Messrs Wood and Co. have shown that when they have a mind to brew a good article they know how to do it. Our reporter mentions with some regret that although the tickets wore on the kegs, no glass was provided by which the opinion of the judges could be verified. Mr S. Hardley, of Past street, also showed one of his enamelled gas sunlights, with 14 burners ; and it attracted a considerable amount of attention. Being an extra exhibit, it was not awarded any prize, although certainly deserving of one. Juvenile Templars. —At the meeting of the Sunbeam Lodge of Juvenile Templars, on Monday night, there was a fair attendance. Bros Galloway, Scott, and Poyntz, were appointed judges on the essays on “ Temperance ” prepared by several of the lads and lasses. Those submitted to the judges were considered to be of equal merit, and the amount offered in prizes was therefore equally divided amongst the competitors, viz., Sister Constance Andrews, and Bros. Ross and Corrigan.

Fire Brigade.—The erection of the bell tower for the new bell is now being proceeded with by the contractor, Mr George Compton. The legs are already up, and as the bell is due this week, we may expect to see the warning signal ready in a few days for its dreaded alarm. The height of the bell will be 35 feet above the level of the street, and the situation is on Section 503, near the Post Office.

Important Sale.—Messrs H. Matson and Co. held a sale at Messrs Frisby Bro.-. farm on Longbeach road on Monday. Although the day was gazetted a public holiday, a large number of visitors attended. The freehold land was first brought under the hammer, and, after some spirited bidding, it was knocked down at £l2 12s per acre. A dispute took place as to the bidder, and the lot was again put up, eventually finding a buyer in Mr Robert Frisby, at £ls per acre. A bl«ck of land adjoining—consisting of 200 acres—was purchased by Mr Arthur Frisby at 35s per acre for the goodwill, there being a covenant in the lease to purchase at £8 per acre. The horses, which, we may say, are as good as can be found on any farm on the district, more especially the young stock, went at prices far below their value. The price realised for the land is, however, a guide to the estimation in which farmers hold farms of this class sold on Monday, and we should not be surprised to hear of double that amount being paid for farms nearer the beach before the end of the year. I. O. G. T. —The usual meeting of the Dawn of Peace Lodge was held on Monday night. Two new members were initiated, and the other business done was the appointment of committees, as follow : Sick Committee—Bros. Ashwood, Poyntz, and A. Andrews : the Lodge Sisters. Boom Committee—Bros. Tutty, Mayo, and M'Donald. Finance—Bros. Bowling, Ferriman, and Ashwood. Visiting—Bros. Poyntz and Ferriman.

A Match. —A match took place yesterday afternoon between Mr W. R. Boyle's piebald and Mr W. Price’s “ Round ’em up.” As the majority of the inhabitants of the comity had cleared out for the show, the cabmen, express drivers, stable boys, and other horsey men went for sport on their own account, and the piebald and the pound-keeper’s old cr >ck had a halfmile spin. Cotton, on the circus horse, got the best of it by a length. The result appeared to be very satisfactory to the assemblage of cabbies and expressmen, who were present to witness the result. If any of their horses are out on the loose to-night, perhaps the result wont be so pleasant.

The Agricultural Prospects. — The happy smile on every farmer’s face just now does one good to look at. Not for many seasons has the weather played so steadily into the hands of the husbandman as this year it has done from seed time, and, let us hope, up to harvest inclusively. A stretch of fine sunshine, then a judicious and timely shower. This has been the sort of prolusion made for us by Providence, and as a result every green thing is greener than ever we have seen it, and the whole croppage of the district is as luxuriant as the most sanguine could well hope. Feed is as abundant and as wholesome as it ever has been seen “ here or hereabout,” .and one cannot help wondering at the great change in the appearance this year on the face of creation as compared with that of last year. Last November, fierce scorching nor’-westers had dried up everything on the land, and blasted the hopes of the husbandman. This November the country looks as if the cornucopia had been specially emptied for the benefit of the district. The change from the dry barrenness of last year to the laughing abundance of the present is indeed extraordinary, and one that cannot fail to tell in the farmer’s favor when accounts come to be squared after harvest home. It is never safe to hallo till we are out of the wood, but wo cannot help thinking that this season will see our “thistly curse repealed ’’and a grand return gathered. Everywhere the promises are rich, and farmers are hopeful. Let us trust that those hopes will not be blasted and that an ample equivalent will bo given this season for the shortcomings and losses of those that have been experiencedjin the past, 1

Sir George's Election Telegrams.— The interesting telegram regarding the Cheviot election, of which we heard so much some time ago, does not appear to have been the only one of its kind, and now we find the hon. member for Collingwood wanting to know, you know, as follows ; —“ That a copy of a telegram, addressed individually to numerous electors of the Collingwood electorate, and signed ‘G. Grey,’ and received on the day of the election, be laid before this House.” The Cattle Show at Tinwald.— The Show promises to be a very good thing. Already 3GO entries have been received for the various classes, against a , total of 283 last year, and all are not yet in. The horses will this year be an excellent show, both as regards numbers and excellence. 98 entries are already on the list for the several classes in which exhibits can be shown. Wo may add, relative to horses, that a class for three-year-old draught geldings was omitted, but entries for it will now be received up to Saturday night. A prize has also been offered for the best single-harness buggy horse, and already three entries are in for it. Beware of Impostors.—Wo have been

requested to caution our readers against a

class of men who are constantly endeavoring to impose mi the charitably-disposed in our midst. These men are in the habit in pouring out a most pitiable tale—pleading in s-mic cases absolute starvation. A gentleman vie called on us yesterday morning ga>- 1 an instance of a loafer wbo craved monetary assistance from him, and hearing the woeful story, our informant's heart was touched, and handing over live ahilh'”g-i, told the individual to go and satisfy' h's hungry appetite. \n b.;v afterwards, having business at rue

lucid hotels, lie found his rooem. c.-iin.-d.ui - mice in a state of beastly bd without doubt the result of tie-.. and tondev-heartodness of our informant. Such pests to society close the hearts of the benevolent against cases of real distress. We would recommend the use of the “cat” as a deterrent to such despicable conduct.

Railway Arrangements for Show and Races. —We learn with pleasure that the Railway authorites have arranged to run the trains between Timaru and Christchurch during our Show and Race Days at reduced fares—that is, the double journey can be done for the ordinary single fare. In addition a special train will leave Ashburton at a quarter-past one for Tinwald, on Show Day, and will return at a quarter to four. The last

arrangement will allow everybody an opportunity of seeing the Show at its best without any undue sacrifice of time. The other railway arrangements will doubtless bring a large number of farmers and farmseryants from the stations up and down the line, and admit of many old Ashburtonians coming from Timaru, Christchurch, and elsewhere for the holidays. Chertsey Sports. —A public meeting was held on Saturday evening, Bth Nov., at Mr Wallace’s Hotel, Chertsey, for the purpose of making the necessary arrangements for holding the usual athletic sports in Chertsey on New Year’s Day. Mr W. A. Brown was chairman, and a large num-

ber of residents of the district were present. The chairman at some length explained the object of the meeting. The following resolutions were carried—“ That a general committee be formed from the gentlemen present, with power to add to to their number; and that they elect a working committee to canvass for subscriptions ; ” also ‘ ‘ that the following be appointed a working committee : Messrs J. Wallace, W. A. Brown, E. Bowley, P. Murphy, J. Wilkinson, and W. Payton.” “ That a meeting he held on Saturday,

22:id Nov., vvhou the general committee will be expected to attend and hear the report.” “That the thanks of this meeting be accorded to Mr Francis, treasurer for last year.” Mr Francis replied in suitable terms. At the request of Mr Francis, air Payton was asked to take over the cash on hand. A subscription

list was then handed round, when these

present came forward very liberally. A vote of thanks to the chairman terminated tho proceedings. Thunderstorm— On Tuesday and yesterday wo were blessed with hearty showers of rain that have come most ov.portunely, bid we have not had a rainfall ao heavy as that experienced by e;:r neighbors. True, a peal or two of distant thunder was heard, hero on T-u-.-'day, but at Timaru the thunder ■was of extra-

ordinary violence, and tho rainfall was a perfect torrent for two solid hours. The agent of tho Press Association there supplies tho following account of the state of matters “ This morning a thunderstorm of extraordinary violence burst over Timaru, causing great damage and loss of property. Its effects seem to have been concentrated within a radius of three miles of the centre of the town. It broke about half past nine o’clock, and for an hour tho water came down in volumes. By halfpast ton many of the lower parts of the town were flooded to a depth of two feet and a turbid current rushed through some of the principal offices, sweeping out papers and. other valuables. At the back of the railway station, on the newly excavated land, a large sheet of water several feet in depth was formed. In the National Mortgage and Agency Company’s store the water rose fully three feet, ruining a large amount of valuable goods. This Company alone estimate their loss at over a thousand pounds. A strong current from the hill behind it swept through the National Bank, and Messrs Tate and Hall’s offices. The water was so deep in parts of the main South road at one time, that it was impossible to cross without wading knee deep. The Gas Works were almost completely under water, the pipes being flooded, and it was only by extraordinary efforts that the mains could be pumped clear to enable gas to be supplied to-night. The lower part of the

“ Timaru Herald” office was also under water, while the pressure on the roof of the Grosvenor Hotel was so great that part of the parapet had to be knocked away to allow the water to escape. As it was, many of the upper rooms were flooded. More or less damage was also caused in many private houses. The sewers overflowed,.and for some time it was feared they would burst. By 11.30 a. in. the storm was over, and the sun shining bright and warm. Such an extraordinary fall of water in an hour and a half can hardly be imagined. The total damage done in town must exceed £'2ooo at least. If it had not been for the hilly nature of the place, which permitted a rapid fall to the water, -lie result must | have been most disastrous.”

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The Ashburton Guardian. COUNTY AGRICULTURAL & SPORTING RECORDER. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1879. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 21, 13 November 1879

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