Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

COMMERCIAL.

Ashburton Guardian Office, Monday evening. Messrs Saunders Bros, report sales of wheat in London as follows ;—Ex Maraval, 47s 6d, 48s 9d, and 49s 6d per 4901b5; and ex City of Quebec, 47s 6d and 48s per 4961b5. Messrs Eriedlander Bros, have received advices by the San Francisco mail of the sale of their consignments of wheat per Piako, City of Quebec, and Maraval, at 43s and 49s per quarter. ASHBURTON RETAIL LIST.

The New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Co. (Limited) under date 11th September, 1879, report as follows on Epglish trade : ' Jn the Home industries the feature of the month is the demand which has sprung up in'the iron trade. Large orders have been received from America, Russia, and in spite of the new protective tariff, from GfeSajiy. Prices have not yet been much affected, the limits being doubtless low, and the requirements restricted chiefly to bars, pig and railway iron. There are no indications of improvement in the cotton trade, and efforts are still being made to reduce the rates of wages. The wool trade i 3 dull, but the recent fine weather has imparted an improved tone to the Bradford market, which, for the lack of business, can only be regarded as temporary. fiThe, Customs’ returns for August were published on the Bth instant, and annexed wid be found our usual extracts therefrom. The total imports for the month amounted to £28,335,009, as £29 106 823 last year, showing a tailing on of about 2i per cent. The exports aggregated £17,327,308, as compared with £17,303,538 for August 1878, the figures being practically identical. The most noteworthy feature of the imports is the large increase in the receipts of breadstuffs. The quantity of wheat is 116 per

cent higher and the value 105 i per cent ; and wheat Hour is 123 per cent greater in quantity, and nearly 105 per cent in value. This is to be accounted for by the recent enormous arrivals from the United States, which have, however, reduced the visible supply in that quarter from seventeen to sixteen millions of bushels. On the other hand the importation of barley has declined about 40 per cent in quantity and 34 per cent in value. Indian corn has also fallen off to the extent of 3G per cent in quantity and 35 per cent in value. Of other articles for food consumption, coffee, bacon, currants, and tea have been imported in larger quantities, but prices are lower. Potatoes, raisins, rice, and wine, show a decline in quantities more or less, values in most instances still having a downward tendency. Dutiable goods mark a decline and goods in bond are beginning to accumulate ; it is evident that the purchasing power of the community for articles of luxury has received a check as a consequence of the continued depression in trade. Of raw produce for manufacturing purposes cotton shows an increase of 15 per cent in quantity, but a decrease of 14 per cent in value. Flax, hemp, and jute have been received in larger quantities, but prices are still drooping. Wool has declined 33J per cent in quantity, and 35 per cent in value ; while woollen yarn shows a falling off of 29 per cent in quantity and 25 per cent in value. Turning to the exports, iron and steel have increased 21 per cent in quantity, but the relative advance is only a trifle above 7 per cent in value. The demand which has led to this increased export has been almost entirely from America and Russia. Whether the enquiry be only of a temporary character has yet to be determined. The quantity of copper shipped during the month is greater by 15 per cent, but the relative advance in price is barely 1 per cent. Cotton yarn and twist show a diminution of 9 per cent in quantity, and Hi per cent in value, while cotton piece goods show an advance of 7 per cent, but in value the increase is not appreciable. Jute yam is 1 per cent less in quantity, but the value has increased as much as 134 per cent. Jute piece goods appear to be in demand, the quantity showing an increase of 18 per cent, the relative value being 10 per cent higher. Linen yarn and piece goods show comparatively little alteration in prices. Spirits have been taken off 40 per cent more in quantity, and 22J per cent in value, while refined sugar has”advanced 12J per cent in quantity, with a diminished value to the extent of 4£ per cent. The other articles call for no comment.

s. d. s. d. Butter, inferior to best b? lb I 2 to I 0 Effers. $ dozen 1 2 to 0 0 Cheese, prime quality, p 16 o 8 to 0 10 Bacon, prime smoked, b> lb 0 9 to 0 10 Hams in cloth, $ lb 1 0 to 0 0 Flour in bags, $ loolb 14 6 to 0 0 Oatmeal, # 251b 6 0 to 3'A Lard, lb - 0 9 to 0 0

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
843

COMMERCIAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 14, 28 October 1879

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working