Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Beer-Drinking In America.

There is, we are informed, a man in Cincinatti who has repeatedly drunk (and stands ready to drink any day) 12 glasses of beer while the tire-bells are striking 12 o’clock at noon. When allowed to save the time wasted in conveying so many glasses to and from his lips by pouring the beer into a large bowl and drinking from it, he has taken the contents of 17 glasses while the hour was being struck. The beer glasses hold one-tenth of a gallon each. Seventeen glasses would, therefore, make a full gallon and a half of beer, after making due allowance for foam. The time required to strike the noon hour on the fire-bells does not exceed half a minute. It remains for physiologists to explain where the gallon and a half of beer which Farbaugh is able to pour down his throat in the time named goes to. It does not make him drunk, and he claims to feel no bad effects after thus gorging himself. The discovery of this case led the reporter of the “ Cincinatti Commercial ” to go the rounds of the breweries with a view to ascertain the possibilities of beer drinking ; and he found two instances in waich a keg of beer (eight gallons) had been drunk by a man in two hours for a wager, and without causing intoxication. At Kauft'mann’s brewery he met with a man who drinks more than ;50 glasses of beer every day ; and has done this for so many years that if the firm had charged him 5 cents a glass for his beer instead of letting him have it for nothing, he would have had by this time to pay the enormous amount of 25,000 cents for it. The reporter says :•“ The men employed in the business begin work at 3 o’clock in the morning, and do not go home uniil 0 in the evening. Their work is much of it heavy, and many of them have been thus employed for a score of years. They are stout and hearty in spite of their weakness for beer. Some of them are fleshy, but in many instances their parents were fleshy before them. They sleep less than most men. They are not as quick, either mentally or in their bodily movements, a> those in many of the other walks of life."

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
396

Beer-Drinking In America. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 14, 28 October 1879

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working