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Dbunks. —William Lambert, who has two or three times recently been before the Court for drunkenness, was yesterday fined £2, Avith tho alternative of 48 hours’ imprisonment. He chose to Avork out his treedoin, instead of buying it for £2. William Commie, another man who has before this made his bow to the Bench, was similarly sentenced, and chose the same thrifty course as did Lambert. Commie had been drunk and kicked up a great toav in tho Somerset Hotel, disturbing the house so much that the Avashhouse of the hotel had to be temporarily converted into a lock-up until tire arrival of the police, Avhen Mr Shearman and his men were relieved from their Avarder duties.

The Borough Officers. —In Committee of the Avhole Council on Monday evening, the question of reducing the permanent staff of the Corporation Avas discussed, when the folloAving procedure was entertained To retain the Town Clerk at his present salary, with the duties of rate collector added to those of the clerkship ; to dismiss the Engineer and present Foreman of Works, and to invite applications for a foreman who will also be inspector of nuisances ; to dispense with borough solicitor after his term has expired. These arrangements, of course, may be influenced by circumstances. A Neglected Quarter. —We haA r e heard complaints frequently from that portion of the district situated in the North East Town Belt, known to fame as Gas Town, to the effect that a certain highway or byeway is not what it should be. This thoroughfare is in an unfortunate predicament. It is represented on the plans of sections sold to purchasers as being Prince’s street, and as such looks very pretty on the map ; but a visit to it, or Avhat is worse, a residence in the locality of it, discloses the fact that Prince’s street on the map and Prince’s street in fact don’t fit in. The owners of sections fronting on this delightful road do not seem to have much prospect of relief. As it is not a public road the Road Board cannot deal with it, and will not accept a dedication of it until it is formed, and nobody is inclined to go to the expense of performing the necessary Avork. Meantime Day and Martin’s blacking is a superfluity in Gas Town. Dentistry. —Mr Cattlin, the well-knoAvn dentist, may be consulted at Quill s Hotel until this afternoon.

Volunteer Inspection. —Last, night the Ashburton Rifles, to the number of fifty two men, were inspected by Colonel Packe, the officer commanding the district. The company has been in close and steady training ever since its formation, and the men have displayed a very commendable enthusiasm, as evinced by their regular attendance at parade, and the readiness with which they have mastered the exercises and movements in which up to this date they have been drilled by Color Sergeant Dolman. In view of the Colonel’s visit a special effort had been made to make a presentable appearance, and the three drill nights a week had been fully taken advantage of, so that when Colonel Packe arrived last night ho found a full muster awaiting him. Rifles—the old muzzle loading Enfield—had been served out to the men some time ago, so that already some nights have been occupied with tl e manual exercise. The impecuniosity of the Government, or at least their unpreparedness for any possible skirmish with a foe, found them with only a very few Sniders in their possession, and these had all been served to out the old established volunteer corps throughout the colony. When the Maori scare occurred twenty per cent of the new rifles were called in from the South to arm the volunteers in the North ; and of course, new companies in the South Island, where war did not threaten, had to be content with such arms as were at the command of the Government. We believe, however, that a large numberof Sniders are on the way to New Zealand, and as soon as possible the old arms will be replaced by the new. On Tuesday the company was drilled by Ser-geant-Major Instructor Morgan, and last night he had the corps under arms an hour previous to the Colonel’s arrival. At eight o’clock the company took open order for inspection by the commanding officer, and after he had made the customary examination of arms, &c., the men were put through the various exercises in which they have been drilled. This lasted for an hour, and then the Colonel addressed the men. He said he was more than pleased at the appearance they presented. They had gone through their work with remarkable steadiness, and their discipline was very good. He could scarcely address them all as men, for he observed some very young soldiers among them. This, however, did not offend him, for the Cape war had been fought and won by striplings. But the heart of an Englishman was in the British soldier whether he was sixteen or sixty years old. The fault of youth, if it was one, cured itself, and if the young men attended to their drill all through as they had evidently done already, he had no doubt they would present at the Easter Review at Christchurch the best appearance of any corps under his command. They were lucky in the possession of a very superior band, whose music had entertained them that night, and they were also fortunate in having the use of a drill shed, the like of which he did not see in the occupation of any other corps. He hoped, however, that it would, for the kind owner’s sake, be well filled after harvest with grain at 4s a bushel and 40 bushels to the acre. Ho would take the first opportunity of thanking the Mayor for lending the hall. After making some remarks about the uniform, the Colonel concluded with a few words of farther compliment and advice, and the corps was dismissed. The band, under Bandmaster Savage, with the large majority of the members of the corps then marched through the town,

Suez Mail.— Supplementary mails for United Kingdom Ac., via Brindisi and Southamptoji (for specially addressed correspondence) will be despatched per express train on Friday, to connect with the Arawata at the Bluff.

Stray Dogs.— The licensed nuisances have been at it again, and complaints are rife of mischief done among the sheep flocks by canine marauders. On some farms poison is being laid down, and we have no doubt this mixing of the war paint will have its usual effect upon the idle curs.

The Valuation of the Borough.— Tenders are invited, from persons competent for the duty, for the work of making the valuation of the Borough and completing the roll for the year 18S0. The whole work has to be finished by the 7th of January next. Road Rates. The Wakanui Road Board notifies its intention of striking a rate of ninepence in the £ on the rateable value of all property in the district, for the year ending 31st March, 1880. The meeting to strike the rate will be hold on the Gth November next, and the rate book lies for inspection at the Board’s offices, Moore street, Ashburton, The rate will be payable in one sum on and after Thursday, 13th November.

Eugene Joseph O’Connor. —Our telegrams announce the committal for trial, at the Roefton Court, on a chaege of perjury, of Eugene Joseph O’Connor. Mr O’Connor was at one time Provincial Secretary for Nelson, and contested the Superintendency of the Province with Mr Oswald Curtis, late M.H.R. for Nelson City. He also sat in the House of Representatives for the Buller district.

Loading a Stockwhip. —A man at Takaka, in the Nelson Province, wdiile trying to load the handle of a stockwhip with lead, poured the molten metal into the wrong place—for a wet whip handle must be the wrong place for molten lead with the result that his eyes were visited suddenly by a liquid scarcely so soft as eye-lotion. We learn, however, that after a prompt application of kerosene, cream, Ac., and a week’s blindness, he is recovering his eyesight.

Raising a Drink. —An apparently penitent drunk, on a recent Sunday, drew up with a very respectable member of an Ashburton church, and desired to be put in the way to do well. The good man was sceptical of the alleged reformation, but, remembering that Abraham had entertained angels unawares, he received the repentant one kindly, and took him to church with him. The repentant one evinced a strong desire to be liberal in the cause he had so recently espoused, and expressed his willingness to incur an indebtedness of one shilling to the aforesaid respectable member, so that when the collection plate should come round he would not require to look sheepishly at the offering gatherer. The good man tumbled up the required shilling as they entered the sanctuary together. The penitent’s heart was glad, but as the service proceeded, his stomach gave out, he said, and it was necessary for him to withdraw from the service, however much it was against his inclination to deprive himself of a new found joy in religion. But the respectable gentleman was not to be taken in. He followed the penitent and stomachically afflicted one out of the sanctuary, and mildly reminded him that the church must have its shilling. He would take it, and as attorney for the penitent, drop it into the plate. The quondam thirsty one, feeling himself fairly flabbergasted, paid over the bullion to a man whom he found he could not outwit, and went away to find some other means of wetting his whistle, but he did not bless the kind man who had helped him for a time to a chance of entertaining intentions of reform.

I. O. G. T—The weekly meeting of the Dawn of Peace Lodge was held on Monday evening. About 60 members were present, including visitors from the Tinwald and Waterton lodges. Bro. Moses, of the latter lodge, gave a very cheerful report of the progress of that lodge—intimating since the opening of the new public house at Waterton, the lodge, although losing three had gained thirteen new members. About an hour was spent in harmony, several brothers and sisters contributing. Bro. Sando read a circular from a member of one of the Timaru lodges regarding changes in the constitution and Grand Lodge bye-laws, and asking the lodge’s opinion, which appeared to be that while some of the changes might engage the attention of the Grand Lodge at its next sitting, others would not as they involved too radical changes in the constitution. The lodge closed in the usual form at 0.45.

Winslow Sports. —The annual sports at Winslow have always been popular, and we are glad to observe that this year their recurrence is to be provided for. On Friday next, the 24th inst,, a meeting is to be held to make the preliminary arrangements, and we have no doubt as successful a meeting as former ones have been will be held.

Last Year’s Customs Duties.—During 1878, duty was paid on 050,195 gallons of spirits imported into New Zealand, amounting to £390,117, while £3432 was also paid on 11,440 gallons of New Zealand spirits. Cigars and snulf, 87,39G1b., added £21,849 to the revenue, and tobacco (inclusive of sheep-wash tobacco) brought £133,0G5, the amount imported being 1,0G4,5201b. The duty paid on wine amounted to £39,G35, that on beer to £29,315, representing 488,252 gallons. The tea imported into the colony amounted to 2,896,7201 b., the duty on which came to £72,418. Coffee, cocoa, &c., was imported to the extent of G78,73G1b., and £80,877 was paid as duty. There was also £128,203 paid as duty on 30,764,7201 b. of sugar. Opium to the extent of 25801 b, was imported, the duty amounting to £2580.

Mr. Sankey was anounced to sail from England on the 17th July “to join Mr. Moody for the autumn and winter campaign in America.” Miss Thompson (Mrs. Butler) has been requested by Queen Victoria to paint for her two battle scenes—one of them being the field of Rorke’s Drift.

Negrete, commander of the Mexican army, lias pronounced against President Porfirio Diaz, and left the capital with 3000 adherents. President Diaz, at the head of the troops has started in pursuit of Negrete,

Criminal Offence. —Mr Cox yesterday remanded till Friday James Wells, a man from Rakaia, who was accused of assault with a criminal intent upon a girl aged five years, living at Rakaia. Wells was not admitted to bail.

Minister oe Marine. —Major Atkinson has been gazetted as Marine Minister and Administrator of the Naval Training Schools Act, 1874. A cargo of 1007 bags of rice meal from Genoa was recently destroyed at Liverpool, because it was proved to be adulterated with marble dust.

The Manchester correspondent of the Press Association says a movement is on foot in that city to organise a subscription to present Lord Beaconsfield with a coronet.

It is suggested that Mr. J. E. Cal dor, of Hobart Town, should be asked to write a “History of Tasmania,” he having in his possession many old and valuable records of that colony.

Chertsey Cemetery. — The following appointments of trustees for the maintenance of Chertsey Cemetery are gazetted : William Alexander Brown, Alfred Rollings Markham, William Bedor Baton, Thomas Walker Wilkinson, Ronald Campbell, Harry Childs, William Leslie.

Trout. —A very large number of young trout have this season been liberated in the Ashburton and Rakaia tributaries and creeks, and now a groat many thousands of them are in the rivers. In the “Gazette” of the 16th inst. the conditions are published under which licences are granted to anglers, from which it will be scon that the “ open ” time is between the 10th October, inst., and the 31st of March next year. Licenses are not transferable, and are to be produced and shown on demand to any person holding and showing a license, or to any police officer or constable ; failure to so produce a licenfce rendering the illegal angler liable to a penalty of £2O. Licenses only permit fishing with rod and line, and debar the use of any “ groundbait,” net, or any other “ engine or instrument,” under a penalty of £SO. All trout less than eight inches in length that may be caught by the holder of a license must he returned alive to the water, and an infringement of this regulation subjects the offender to forfeiture of his license, and also to a penalty of £2O. £IOO is the fine attached to the offence of introducing into any liver dynamite, or other explosive substance, or any matter or liquid deleterious to fish.

The Scotch evangelist, Dr. Somerville, is laboring among the English-speaking people in Paris, and has his son to assist him. He intends to hold meetings in other cities on the Continent.

A claimant has arisen for the whole of the land between Prince’s Bridge Melbourne and the bay at Sandridgc, a distance of about four miles. The land has been valued at five millions sterling.

A branch of the Farmers’ Union has been formed at Tongala. Another branch, to be called the Lake Manual, Terraffee, Buckrabanyule, and lower Avoca Farmers’ Union, has also been succesfully established.

Te Whiti Wanting a Convert.—A traveller who was on a journey from Hawera to New Plymouth (says the Taranaki “ Herald ”) was stopped on the road, being unable to ford the creeks near Parihaka on Friday last owing to the heavy rains. He was met by some of the Parihaka natives, who kindly conducted him to the settlement, and provided him with food and shelter. Te Whiti was anxious that he should remain altogether at the settlement, and said he would be provided with a wife if he would only become a convert and settle at Parihaka. The allurements offered by To Whiti, although very tempting, were not quite strong enough to entice the wanderer, and he thanked the prophet heartily, but said he had a pressing engagement at New Plymouth, and could not therefore stay at Parihaka. Te Whiti allowed the traveller to rest until the next day, when the floods in the river had subsided, and then sent some of his followers to conduct his guest safely over the worst jiortion of the road. A Volunteer Executioner. —lf the Queensland Legislative Assembly is made up of the human specimen belonging to it who wrote the following letter to the Brisbane “ Telegraph ” we are sorry for Queensland: —“With regard to my emotions towards the Chinese, I have to say that I -would cheerfully shoot every Chinaman in Queensland, and not feel a pang of remorse.” Now says an exchange, this is the right man to satisfactorily solve the Chinese question ; but he must start early. There arc about 15,000 Chinamen in our sister colony, and, counting 300 working days in each year, he must pop off five a day to get through the -work in ten years. Captain Bobadil himself was, even in words, but a weakling, when compared with this modern would-be wholesale slaughterer.

Dr. W. H. Russell, it is echoed, is to have a fee of two thousand guineas for the campaign, as special correspondent of the “ Daily Telegraph,” in Zululand -

Government-house, Simla, has been laid with gas made from mineral oil. The system has also been tried at the Lahore railway station with every success.

Wallace Ross expresses his intention of going to Australia to take part in the regatta in which Trickett, the champion oarsman of the world, will participate. A Mixed Indictment.—The peculiar manner in which criminal indictments ai-e framed, even in these enlightened days, was exemplified this morning. A man was indicted first for killing seven sheep ; next for killing the same sheep maliciously ; then for killing them with intent to steal the carcases ; still further with intent to steal the skins; and, finally, for stealing and driving away these unlucky sheep ! No person could surely be guilty of such fiendish atrocity as to steal, kill, cut up for butchers’ meat, and finally drive away seven innocent sheep. Chronicle.”

Chloroforming Pigs.—The “Leeds Mercury ” relates that a medical gentleman at Sudbury, near Derby, gives his pigs chloroform when he runs short of food for them, and the pigs remain unconscious for periods ranging from a week to 10 days ; and, strange to say, so far from losing flesh, exhibit a marked improvement when they recover from the effects of the amesthetio.

Telegraphic. —The Telegraph Department are just now crippled through the fault in the Cook’s Straits cable, the repairs to which has been somewhat x - e tarded by bad weather. As a consequence Press telegrams have been curtailed, and such as are forwarded are considerably delayed. A request lias been issued by the Department to evening newspaper correspondents to condense their dispatches as much as possible, to forward only items of real importance, and in no case to exceed 100 words. Last night the special wires were altogether suspended between 10 and 11, and at half-past one the Parliamentary report had reached that part which communicated the fact that the House resumed at 7'oo, and passed the second reading of the Oamaru Harbor Works Bill.

Valuation of the County. —Mr G. P. F. Loach, valuator for the County, is now busily engaged in assessing the properties in the County. The work is no light one, but as Mr Leach’s abilities as a horseman and a judge of the quality of land arc the qualifications required for such a contract, we expect to see a ratepayers’ roll properly compiled.

Hakes. —Hares have become a nuisance in Nelson province, and the Governor has withdrawn them from the provisions of the Protection of Wild Animals Act.

The Nihilists’ Policy.—A Russian Nihilist in the “North American Review,” boldly avows that assassination is a weapon the use of which lie and his friends deem lawful, and which they are determined to employ. He writes—- “ When not only the public speech is stifled, but the innermost thoughts of the citizen are searched and pried into by a barbarous inquisition, then the time has come for the dagger and the pistol to speak ”

The death of Captain Wyatt-Edgoll, of the 17th Lancers, is, says “ Truth,” a singularly melancholy one. There was not a more popular man in the regiment at .any time. He had just succeeded to a handsome property in Leicestershire, part in possession and part in reversion, since the date of his sailing for Zululand. It is doubtful whether the news of this had reached him before he met his fate.

The death is announced of the Rev. W. Leeke, who carried the colors of the 52nd Regiment at Waterloo.

Singular Occurence. —A prominent horse-dealer of Montreal tells a curious story about the fancy his rats (as he calls them) have for a change of diet. He keeps a horse, and noticed lately that he showed symptons of lameness in his forelegs. He he examined him carefully, but could not discover the cause. On going into the stable one day he, before entering, looked in through the window, when to his astonishment, he counted eleven rats stuck on the horse’s legs sucking his blood. He waited, expecting every moment that the horse would shake them off, but instead of doing this he remained motionless, and seemed to enjoy the strange visitors. A lap on the window sent the rats skurrying off. On examintion of the horse’s legs he found twenty-two little holes, from eleven of which blood was flowing. The horse was removed to another stable and soon recovered his sores ; but, strange to say, his appetite has almost failed him ; he refuses oats, and as a consequence lias fallen in flesh so much, that now he is almost useless.

A Flutter in Bachelors’ Hall.— Quite a flutter was created in a bachelors’ establishment at Foil ding the other day, if the local paper is to be credited. A respectably dressed woman with a cliild called at the house, and in a very polite! maimer asked the proprietor if he would kindly sec that the child was sent to a relation of hers, who was named at the I time. This gentleman, who is noted for his kindly manner, consented to do so, and the woman left, stating that she was going as far as Palmerston where she would meet a gentleman who was going to start her in business at Foxton. The proprietor of the bachelor establishment sent the child to the address named as pi omised, but the lady of the house denied all knowledge of the child, and would have nothing to do with her. The woman did not re- i turn, and it being past 10 o’clock at night and the discomfited bachelors finding thatthe child was on their hands, at any rate for the present, proceeded to make the little waif comfortable by putting her to bed. A gloomy council of war followed, and it is to he feared that the erstwhile gay young bachelors—saddened by the prospect (jf having this encumbrance attached to their festive haunts without any immediate prospect of being rid of it—got but little sleep that night. Early next morning they were out scouring the country, and at length, to their great delight, found the child’s grandmother, who was ultimately prevailed upon to relieve them of their burden. Thereupon joy again reigned ’upreme in that bachelor household. The heartless mother, it is said, has made her way to Wellington witli the other child. Bachelor establishments beware !

A Valuable Insect. —We learn from the ‘ ‘ Colonies and India” that an American explorer has recently discovered, in the little-known district of Youcatan, bordering on British Honduras, a valuable insect, possessing properties which ought to make it a rival of the cochineal and shellac-producing insects. This is the neen or niin, a species of coccus, which feeds on the mango tree and similar plants, and exists in enormous qualities in Central America. It is of considerable size, of a yellowish brown color, and emits a peculiar oily odour, containing, as it does, a large quantity of fatty oil. or rather grease. This grease is used by the natives for various purposes, being highly prized as a medicinal oil for ex ternal application, and it is also employed for mixing paints. It can be made to change its condition very considerably by different ju’ocesses. When exposed to great heat the lighter oils evaporate, leaving a tough, flexible mass, resembling half-softened wax, but unaffected by heat or cold, which may be used as a lacquer or varnish. When burnt this material produces a thick, semi-fluid mass, somewhat resembling a solution of imliarnbber, which after a few days becomes bard and solid. As a cement this substance will be invaluable, and it might also bo used for waterproofing purposes.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18791023.2.7

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 12, 23 October 1879

Word Count
4,159

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 12, 23 October 1879

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