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The Chinese.—We deeply regret to hear as the intelligence is a forerunner of what will inevitably be attempted in Wellington, that the Chinamen of Auckland in conjunction with other Chinese firms in New Zealand, and backed by a powerful combination of their countrymen in Hong Kong, are about to try the experiment of importing into that city, as well as into other parts of the colony, a completely organised party of Chinamen, representing the various trades and callings, in order to compete with local workmen, and that they are to be followed by other similar shipments should the first experiment succeed. It seems therefore that the ‘ ‘ yellow agony ” is to afflict the North Island of New Zealand on a scale attempted hitherto in no other part of the colony. Now is the time for all persons, mechanics and the working classes especially, to be up and doing. The time for mere preliminary discussions has gone by, and such associations as that of the New Zealand Hitel Employees have a distinct work to to, and a distinct enemy to face. We shall continue to watch-this question carefully, for Mongolian invasion means the most serious interference with the labor market of New Zealand which it is possible to imagine.—“ Chronicle.” £25 For a Leo.—A settler up Wairarapa way broke his leg. The local “ sawbones ” thought amputation might be necessary, but thought it well to have a well-known Wellington surgeon up to perform the operation, so a telegram was sent asking him to come, and guaranteeing £25 for the job. The ‘’Medico,” took his case of instruments, and started for the country. Arrived there, he examined the patient’s leg, and said he thought he could avoid amputation. So the leg was duly dressed and put in splinters. Then the Ipatient handed the doctor a cheque for £l2 10s. “Hum,” says the doctor, “it was to be £25.” “Ah, but you haven’t cut off A® leg,” retorted the patient. “ Well,” rejoined the doctor, “ I’m not comfortable in my mind about that leg. After all,_ it might be safest to have it off! ” So suiting the action to the word, the “ Medico” off with his coat, got the leg into position, took knife in hand, and was about_ to operate on the unhappy patient forthwith. But lie didn’t operate. Without a murmur the patient handed over the £26 cheque, and the “ Medico ” deferred the operation. And it is a remarkable fact that the leg is now getting all right.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18791021.2.35.2

Bibliographic details

Page 4 Advertisements Column 2, Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 11, 21 October 1879

Word Count
414

Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, Issue 11, 21 October 1879

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