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PILLOW, THE CHRISTCHURCH HIGHWAYMAN.

On Monday, the young man Pillow, accused of assault with intent, was committed for trial. The evidence of Mr. H. E. May deacibos the adventure on the road as follows :

When about a quarter of a mile from the Riccarton Hotel on the Christchurch side a man rushed from the side walk on the near side to the centre of the road, and held up both hand?, shouting to us to stop. He then seized the horse’s bridle, and the horse was pulled up to a walking pace. The lamps in the buggy weielit, and I observed the man had a mask on. He presented a, lev, Ivor m me, and demanded me in ihdiver up un money, or he would tire. I told him I had no money. He still had hold of the bridle and stood about (3ft. off, and then ho said, “If you have no money, you have a watch. Deliver up your watch.” The coachman Harris then said, “ I have 4s. 6d., if he would take that. ” Harris was off by that time, and behind the buggy. Harris handed the money to Mrs May, who was still seated in the buggy. She said, “ I’ll hand it him ; he’ll surely not shoot a woman.” By this time he had come nearer, and was standing about 2ft. from the front wheel of the buggy. Seeing Mrs May’s hand extended, I was rising to pidl it back, and the man said, “If you move, I will fire. I immediately jumped at him and he fired. This brought me within about two feet of him, and I caught him. The flash of the pistol shone in my face. I experienced a sensation on the neck and shoulders as if the bullet had hit me. Another shot was then fired, Harris rushing to my assistance, while I had hold of him. We immediately had him on the ground. I requested my wife to drive hack to the hotel for assistance, Avliich she did. In a few minutes the trap returned, with Mr. Lewis, of the Riccarton Hotel, and another man. I requested one to go to the Police Depot, and the other to take my place to secure the man, while I returned to the hotel to see if the shot had really touched mo, and to look after my wife Harris and the other man were left in charge of the prisoner. I got the revolver from the prisoner, and afterwards gave it to Detective Benjamin. It was-in the same state as when I took it from the man. The revolver produced is the same. I fancy I heard the pistol click, hut am not quite sure. I did not know who the man was. It was very dark. The overcoat I wore that night I gave to Detective Benjamin. The mark on the shoulder was from the first shot. The undercoat I wore was also marked. I had a small bruise on my shoulder, hut the bullet did not penetrate my clothes. Before giving the coat to Detective Benjamin I noticed a scorched mark, which must have been done by the second shot. It was not there previously. I examined the revolver before giving it to Detective Benjamin, and found two chambers discharged and four loaded with cartridge and ball. I saw at the hotel that the man had on a leather belt. The man was a short man, shorter than myself. The mask was of some black material, with two holes cut for the eyes. It was very similar to the one produced. The man had on a pair of dark blue trousers, made of some cotton material. They appeared to be of navy blue. I saw the prisoner that night at the Riccarton Hotel, and afterwards at the Police Depot in charge of Detective Benjamin, at about eleven o’clock.

Detective Benjamin, who searched the prisoner, found this mask (produced) hanging by the strings round his neck. He had this dagger and belt (produced) round his body under his coat. I also found thirteen or fourteen revolver cartridges in his pockets. He had two pair of trousers on, an overcoat and an undercoat, and a cap on his head. He had the hat produced in his pocket. At the same sitting of the Court prisoner was committed for trial on another charge of robbing the museum, whence he had stolen sundry daggers, poignards, and spear heads, from the Antiquity room.

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PILLOW, THE CHRISTCHURCH HIGHWAYMAN. Ashburton Guardian, Volume I, 16 October 1879

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